Lack of Pelvic Movement

banzaiengr

Level 6 Valued Member
I've had a bit of pain of late. It started with tightness in the hamstrings. Over time this grew into hip pain and then pain across the lower back. Generally this pain whether all or just one area occurred after sitting or when getting out of bed in the morning and trying to stand.

First thought was that it was piriformis issues. I spoke with a local trainer who believed that also. Later when visiting the Physical Therapist I see for a heel injury I spoke to him about it. I had spoke to him earlier when it was just hamstring and hip pain. He checked my hinge and back squat and stated, "your pelvis doesn't move dude". He then investigated and found extreme tightness around my tail bone. He gave me a couple stretches to do. I see him again next Tues.

Anyone else have this problem? What did you do to correct it? How long did it take to see improvement? Thanks in advance.
 

Steve Freides

Staff
Senior Certified Instructor
Elite Certified Instructor
@banzaiengr, I have read that a properly performed deep squat, bodyweight only, can reset the sacrum's alignment. I can't say if this is true or not because, although I'm a doctor, I'm not that kind of doctor :) but if you can learn to use the goblet squat for this, your body will be much happier. It can be part of the prying of the prying goblet squat. It is a go-to movement for me daily. (I am fortunate enough to be able to perform it without needing a "goblet" as a counter-balance and thus able to do it anytime, anywhere.) In particular, when my back sometimes goes "out", doing these puts it back "in" much more rapidly than if I don't do them, often a matter of a few days rather than a few weeks.

-S-
 

banzaiengr

Level 6 Valued Member
@banzaiengr, I have read that a properly performed deep squat, bodyweight only, can reset the sacrum's alignment. I can't say if this is true or not because, although I'm a doctor, I'm not that kind of doctor :) but if you can learn to use the goblet squat for this, your body will be much happier. It can be part of the prying of the prying goblet squat. It is a go-to movement for me daily. (I am fortunate enough to be able to perform it without needing a "goblet" as a counter-balance and thus able to do it anytime, anywhere.) In particular, when my back sometimes goes "out", doing these puts it back "in" much more rapidly than if I don't do them, often a matter of a few days rather than a few weeks.

-S-
Thanks Steve, any type of front squat is what I've been doing for sometime. The goblet is a great squat. Will probably be my squat of choice for a time. Whatever the issue is, the PT has found it is something with my spine causing tightness in the glutes.
 

Steve Freides

Staff
Senior Certified Instructor
Elite Certified Instructor
Very good. The important point here is to focus not on any specific weight but the prying aspect, with a focus on prying the bottom of your spine. Just wanted to be sure that was clear.

In this case, if my understanding is correct, you will want to simultaneously push your elbows out against the inside of your knees while trying to get your hips deeper and deeper, all without rounding your spine - the goal is to lengthen your spine.

Best of luck to you.

-S-
 

banzaiengr

Level 6 Valued Member
Have had no relief from this. Finally went to my PCP Tues. and x-rays were taken It's the same thing I've been working around for 30 years, spondylolisthesis of the L5 S1. Basically the L5 is sled forward a little more than halfway across the top of my sacrum. MRI this coming Tues. to determine the extent of the damage.
 

banzaiengr

Level 6 Valued Member
Got the MRI results. I'll post it hear in case there is someone who can tell me what this means.

FINDINGS:

T12-L1: No disc bulge or herniation. No central canal narrowing. No neural
foraminal narrowing.
L1-2: Mild disc bulge. No central canal narrowing. No neural foraminal
narrowing.
L2-3: Loss of disc height with disc bulge. Mild bilateral facet osteoarthritis.
Mild central canal stenosis. Bilateral lateral recess stenosis. Moderate
bilateral neural foraminal narrowing.
L3-4: Symmetric disc bulge. Moderate bilateral facet osteoarthritis and
ligament flavum hypertrophy. Moderate central canal stenosis. Bilateral lateral
recess stenosis. Moderate bilateral neural foraminal narrowing.
L4-5: Symmetric disc bulge. Severe bilateral facet osteoarthritis and
ligamentum flavum hypertrophy. Moderate to severe central canal stenosis.
Bilateral lateral recess stenosis. Moderate to severe bilateral neural foraminal
narrowing.
L5-S1: 6 mm anterolisthesis. Symmetric disc bulge. Severe bilateral facet
osteoarthritis and ligamentum flavum hypertrophy. Moderate central canal
stenosis. Bilateral lateral recess stenosis. Moderate bilateral neural foraminal
narrowing.
S1-S2: Rudimentary disc at S1-2 with no disc bulge or herniation. No central
canal narrowing. Moderate bilateral facet osteoarthritis. No neural foraminal
narrowing.

Alignment: Anterolisthesis as detailed above.
Bone Marrow: Mild degenerative endplate marrow edema in the mid to lower lumbar
spine.
Conus: Normal termination
Extra-spinal Findings: No significant incidental findings

For the purpose of this report, 5 lumbar type vertebral bodies are assumed.
Close radiographic correlation recommended prior to any spinal intervention or
surgery.

IMPRESSION:
1. Transitional lumbosacral anatomy. For the purposes of this report, there is
lumbarization of the S1 vertebral body. Please see key image detailing numbering
scheme used in this report, close MR and radiographic correlation recommended
prior to spinal intervention or surgery.
2. Moderate to severe central canal stenosis at L3-4 and L4-5 secondary to
degenerative disc disease and facet osteoarthritis.
3. Multilevel lateral recess stenosis and neural foraminal narrowing as detailed
in the body of the report. Neural foraminal narrowing is most pronounced
bilaterally at L4-5.
4. Anterolisthesis of L5 on S1 measuring 6 mm.
5. Severe multilevel facet osteoarthritis throughout the mid to lower lumbar
spine.
Let's start with the 6 mm anterolisthesis at L5. That's type 1 which generally can be treated with conservative measures. I do have the lumbarization of the S1. Does this effect what can be done with the anterolisthesis at L5?

Symmetric disc bulge throughout but that is not a bulging disc. Some thinning of the discs I believe is normal through aging. Osteoarthritis in the lumbar facets could also be considered normal with aging as could the recess stenosis which is build up from scaring in these areas.

My biggest question would be what can I expect as far as continued training? Is this going to continue to be an on again off again issue as it has been the last 30 years? Are there movements that I should stay away from training for the long haul?
 

Steve Freides

Staff
Senior Certified Instructor
Elite Certified Instructor
In your place, I would investigate correcting the misalignment of things to the extent that you can, both for your relief from pain and for giving you a foundation on which to build strength. Chiropractor, physical therapist, physiotherapist, osteopath - those sorts of people. It may also be that the right kind of mobility work could help restore proper alignment.

-S-
 
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