LEO-Trainee training for german SWAT

ZuluEchoNovember

First Post
Dear Sirs and Madams,

thank you for your time in advance.

I am trying to program a full training protocol for the next few years that is favorably simplistic.

But I can clearly see that I need help. I hope I can find some help here. I already red some threads and listened to some podcasts with Pavel. Somehow I was not able to figure out exactly what the exercises should be each day, with what rest periods, with what goals for each set and when to progress. Also I am not sure if I got the bigger picture right of 1 week a bit harder and 1 week a bit lighter out of every month and 1-2 a year ramping training up for a short period (1-3 days?) as if it was test time.

Outline:
My goal is to go into some SWAT Unit. There are several. As far as I can tell the hardest tests are done by GSG9 and possibly the lokal SEK. So that is what I want to prepare for. As it says in the title I am currently a LEO trainee in the first months of mostly academic tuition. So before I can even apply for selection it is 4 to 5 years out. Still some time to train properly.

Background & Situation:
I am 27. So probably a late starter. I am usually between 65 and 70kg and my height is 167cm. So also not the biggest guy.

I can do about 100 pushups without putting the knees down in about 4min (so there is some time in plank position I use to rest), 6 square onearmpushups rightside and 7 left in a row, 25 pull-ups without rest, 50 Situps in 1min if I am allowed to lock my feet in, 15 onelegsquads on each leg (one leg after another) without break (I think I'm doing piostolsquads but I am not sure if I do them correctly - my butt will touch the heel while the other leg is extended forward.), run 1km in 3min (all out effort), 5km in 23min (could do it not the next day but the day after). I also did a half marathon on a few days notice some years back and it took me 2h and 19min. I am also doing Qi Gong, Yoga and Meditation and that sort of stuff (Pavel might say sissy stuff I guess) for about ten years now. Also I tapped into combat sports and shooting a little already before applying to LE.

I have time and the will to train everyday. Currently per week I am doing 3x runs and 3x training session that include some kettlebell swings 32kg before I leave the house and then a short run of 1km with a weightiest (14kg currently but up to 30kg possible) and some resistance bands to some bars in a park where I do Push and Pull Exercises (up, forward, down for each), some Pistolsquads and Jumps, some Mid Section work (Situps, Legraiser and some hip rotations with the resistance bands with the arms straight) including neck (also with the resistance bands) and grip and some Sprints in the end for about 1.5h total (door to door). Also I am doing 1.5h of this Qi Gong and Yoga stuff everyday before sleep.

As soon as this international crisis will allow for combat sport gym to open again I will want to go for 3-4 times a weekend and an extra 2 days for shooting drills. So basically 5-6 days of operational training. I hope to find a combat sport gym which allows for mostly drills so that the body will not be too fatigued by it. I am not much into going to a gym so if it is possible to train with the body, kettlebells, dumbbells and resistance bands it would be awesome. I have no space for a Barbell unfortunately. If barbells have to be done I of course will get some gym membership.

Goal Specifics:
It varies a bit from unit to unit but it seems similar enough to me that I can train for one of the tests for now. The times and the reps are minimum requirements.

Benchpress 75% of bodyweight 20reps
Pullup 15

standing long jump 2.5m
long jump 4.8m
100m Sprint 13,0 sec
Coopertest 12min 3.2km
crosscountryrun 6km in 26min with orientation elements (map and compass)
run 9km in 38min
some two hour torture stair runs

200m swim in 6min
1000m swim in 26min
300m clothed swimming in 10min
400m swim with obligatory swim style changes (50m crawl swim, 150m breaststrokes, 200m backstroke without arm activity) in 15min

Obstaclecourse 2min 30sec

The obstacle course details are a longer thing to outline: 1) 7 Table-tennis sized hurdles, 2) some ropeswing over a table, 3) vertical climb through of wall bars after climbing up and before climbing down, 4) rope climb (climbing uo and down 3-4m), 5) 1.1m buck vaulting, 6) balancing for about 4m on the backside of those exercise benches, 7) some dip walks between parallel bars, 8) some slalom run with six huts, 9) horizontal bar 2.2m (upward) circle backward, 10) climb through some gymnastic box, 11) robbing over a buck, 12) balancing again but with 2 climb throughs of two gymnastic boxes with gaps, 13) 1.2m buck vaulting, 14) climb over short wallbar. There is also always a few meters of running between each obstacle.

They also test some rudimentary climbing skills and knot skills and of course some boxing and jiu jitsu

Their Training Recommendations:
3x Strengthtrainings. 3-5x Runs. 1x Coordinationpractice for the obstacle course. 1x jump and sprint training. They advice 48h of rest between strength training and to choose 4 pull, 4 push, 4 leg exercises by yourself. One strength training should be comprised of 2 pull and 2 push and 4 leg exercises according to them, paring one upper body and one lower body for a circuit . They say progression prioritization is first frequency of training per week, second volume of training within a training session, third rest periods within a training session, fourth intensity of the exercise.

Thank you so much for your time and patience.
Sincerely
EK
 

Bro Mo

Level 6 Valued Member
The most simple template I can think of is to buy a couple books (Reload, S&S, and Q&D) and then implement the specifics of them with a schedule looking something like:

Monday: S&S + Reload (Squat and Bench)
Tuesday: Q&D (Snatches)
Wednesday: Ruck
Thursday: S&S + Reload (Deadlift and Bench)
Friday: Ruck
Saturday: S&S + Q&D (Sprints)
Sunday: Off
 

Starlord

Level 2 Valued Member
First let me congratulate you on achieving a good level of fitness already. As you mentioned you have a few years before you attempt the selection process for your nations SWATA equivalent. So right now a more general approach to training to further develop you GPP in regards to strength (particularly carries) while maintaining your good running times.

Then closer to the time make your training more specific.

I'd advise something akin to the following:

Monday.
AM - 20-60min easy swim + drills
PM - Step loading strength training + combat training

Tuesday.
AM - 20-60min easy run
PM - S&S + hill sprints

Wednesday.
AM - 20-60min easy swim + drills
PM - Step loading strength training

Thursday.
AM - 20-60min easy run
PM - S&S + combat training

Friday.
AM - 20-60min easy swim + drills
PM - Step loading strength + combat training

Saturday.
AM - Brick Session 120min cycle 60min run
PM - S&S

Sunday.
AM - rest
PM - rest

Points to consider, make your hard days hard and your easy days easy. Your sprint sessions will take a lot out of you, where as your step loading sessions will not because you aren't just chasing PRs. So an easy day follows your sprint session.

Your combat sessions allow you to focus on the techniques and drills taught. However as you know you can apply yourself further and use it as additional conditioning too.

S&S is just ridiculously good for 2 movements. Doubles up as muscular conditioning too.

Easy runs and swims as to further build up your aerobic fitness. Your swim sessions can also be used to practice your drills. Which will increase your speed via superior technique.

For strength training focus on deficit push ups and deadlifts. 5×5 on your working weight. So warm up and build up as you see necessary and then 5×5 straight weight. Stay at that weight until you are dominating the weight for all the sets. Only then move up in weight. So your progression is slow and calculated. Think of these sessions as practice and not pushing yourself.

Still do the impromptu events for fun and on those days do not worry about your scheduled training.

This will hit frequency of training and through frequency build up on volume.

You 1 actual intensity sessions a week.

After 12-16 weeks adjust your training. So for example swap your exercise selection from deficit push ups and deadlifts for military Press and squats.
 

ZuluEchoNovember

First Post
Dear Sirs,

thank you both so much for your responses and your time!
Also thank you for your kind words Starlord.

I followed up my post with some more studying. I read TBI and II and familiarized myself a bit with some of Dan Johns Work, including the Easy-Strength concept. Also I found a spot for the barbell in my flat .. well actually its the balcony. Just need to find something that is weatherproof!

strength: I am thinking about 5 times a week: DL & BP & WPU & AbWheel each for 2x5 and S&S or Carries (randomly choose one: Suitcase, Shoulder, Bear). With this I would get S&S and strength in one session basically. Q1: If the whole session gets too hard I could either use a lighter KB or reduce the swings to 75 maybe?

running & swimming & strength endurance: Thank you so much for your input on running and swimming. I have not thought about structuring it this way. Q2: Are that many miles needed? I am afraid that I will not get enough pushups, pull-ups and dips in. Q2: Is it bad to do like 1 set GTG after before and after the swim or the run?

Q&D & specific: I thought I might incorporate this into some of the more specific preparation for the obstacle course (training for 2-3 obstacles per session) together with some jump and sprint training. Probably will take something like 30 to 40min that way.

Following this I would end up at something like this:

Training-Plan:
Day 1:
AM: Strength followed by Swim & SE
PM: Combat Sports

Day 2:
AM: Strength followed by Run & SE
PM: Intense hill sprints with some KB Swings in-between (some carries are hidden here as well)

Day 3:
AM: Strength followed by Swim & SE
PM: Combat Sports

Day 4:
AM: Strength followed by Run & SE
PM: Combat Sports

Day 5:
AM: Strength followed by Swim & SE
PM: Specific Prep

Day 6
AM: Brick Session (starting at 30min swim and 90min run and increasing over time with this 10% rule in mind. )
PM: Rest

Day 7:
AM: Rest
PM: Rest

Q3: What about the training session that are neither full out or just easy like Temporuns or Reset-runs?
Q4: What about two protocols: one for "offseason" (like 6-8 weeks) with a bit more endurance and strength endurance focus and less Maximal-Strength training for CNS and one general (like 8-12+ weeks)?

Again thank you so much for your time and effort!
Sincerely
EK
 

Starlord

Level 2 Valued Member
Dear Sirs,

thank you both so much for your responses and your time!
Also thank you for your kind words Starlord.

I followed up my post with some more studying. I read TBI and II and familiarized myself a bit with some of Dan Johns Work, including the Easy-Strength concept. Also I found a spot for the barbell in my flat .. well actually its the balcony. Just need to find something that is weatherproof!

strength: I am thinking about 5 times a week: DL & BP & WPU & AbWheel each for 2x5 and S&S or Carries (randomly choose one: Suitcase, Shoulder, Bear). With this I would get S&S and strength in one session basically. Q1: If the whole session gets too hard I could either use a lighter KB or reduce the swings to 75 maybe?

running & swimming & strength endurance: Thank you so much for your input on running and swimming. I have not thought about structuring it this way. Q2: Are that many miles needed? I am afraid that I will not get enough pushups, pull-ups and dips in. Q2: Is it bad to do like 1 set GTG after before and after the swim or the run?

Q&D & specific: I thought I might incorporate this into some of the more specific preparation for the obstacle course (training for 2-3 obstacles per session) together with some jump and sprint training. Probably will take something like 30 to 40min that way.

Following this I would end up at something like this:

Training-Plan:
Day 1:
AM: Strength followed by Swim & SE
PM: Combat Sports

Day 2:
AM: Strength followed by Run & SE
PM: Intense hill sprints with some KB Swings in-between (some carries are hidden here as well)

Day 3:
AM: Strength followed by Swim & SE
PM: Combat Sports

Day 4:
AM: Strength followed by Run & SE
PM: Combat Sports

Day 5:
AM: Strength followed by Swim & SE
PM: Specific Prep

Day 6
AM: Brick Session (starting at 30min swim and 90min run and increasing over time with this 10% rule in mind. )
PM: Rest

Day 7:
AM: Rest
PM: Rest

Q3: What about the training session that are neither full out or just easy like Temporuns or Reset-runs?
Q4: What about two protocols: one for "offseason" (like 6-8 weeks) with a bit more endurance and strength endurance focus and less Maximal-Strength training for CNS and one general (like 8-12+ weeks)?

Again thank you so much for your time and effort!
Sincerely
EK
Thank you for the follow up.

A1, based on the template you have shown I would advise cutting deadlifts all together and leaving swings in there. As someone who does swings with a 100kg on a loadable KB and deadlifts 3 times bodyweight I beleive that the swings would offer better bang for your training €.

A2, you will generate a lot of miles in time by slowly increasing the time you are running for. GTG can work but uses different energy systems and would have an interference affect on the adaptation you are trying to produce from the swim/run session.

A3, middle intensity runs would be something you would incorporate closer to your event. As per the work of Dr Stephen Seiler the middle training zones is known as the "training dead ground" by some is remarked by many famous endurance coaches as offering too much pain for too little gain. So we utilise them sparingly and when we move away from base building towards peaking for the actual assessment or sporting event in question.

A4, all great programs should be periodized. I am basically looking at your goals and time frame and treating you akin to that of an olympic athlete. So your "off season" is actually years long. That is an immensely powerful position to be in to be able to build your base over SUCH a vast period of time. Imagine how well prepared you will be for your assessments.

Imagine your physical prep being akin to a metaphorical pyramid. The base is your aerobic capacity and general strength base. The wider the base is, the higher the peak can be. Base building it exactly that. Then when you are closer to your assessments (approx 26 weeks out) you would do an assessment and then plan to peak your performance.

This doesn't mean that your base building program remains the same for year on end. Even your base building program has to change to provide new adaptive responses. This means swapping out swimming for cycling or rowing for a training block or 2. Swapping regular hill sprints for litvinov hill sprints. Changing your strength movements around etc.

This will help build that wide base. However you are still spending sufficient time doing each modality that you can gain a good level of mastery over the technique too.

You should be a very strong generalist by the end of your base building period. Ready to specialise for those selection events.
 

Coyotl

Level 6 Valued Member
You have a long time to train. Don't try and go out and do everything right now. Build a base to work off of, and allow steady consistent work develop it. Trying to do everything right now would not be something I suggest.

I always found swimming easy; I grew up swimming. Do you know how to swim? Do you know how to swim well? It would be time well spent to find a local swim coach, perhaps one at a high school or college swim team. Develop good technique rather than just flail.

I would do 3x long slow runs per week (zone 2 heart rate, for you staying between 153 and 133). 4 at most. Build a base of running, gradually working up to 2-3 @30-60 min and 1 @ 60-90 min. The purpose here is to train your heart.

From here, cycle in blocks on faster runs. I highly recommend watching this video to learn how:


... I believe the gentleman is also a member here. Unlike what I'll say below, I would not frequently test your runs. It wouldn't be a bad idea to run your running on a 6 month periodized plan like described in the video. But again, the main purpose is to build a base. Specific training (to meet the standards) can occur in the last 3-6 months before the test.

One day a week or so, see about practicing some of the obstacle course events, e.g. climb a rope, find parallel bars, etc. This should be mostly play.

Find a local gym and test your bench - use a spotter, or do it in a power rack. See if you CAN bench 75% BW, and see how many you can do. If you can meet the standard, great, go home. Once every 4-6 months, go back and test it again. If it went down, you may need to change your program. If it maintained or improved, keep on keeping on. Once you get to the standard, keep it; the 6 months before actually testing you can actually practice it more to build a specific skill.

Same for the jumps. Find a place to test it, see if you meet the standard. If you meet it, retest every 4-6 months and see if it improved, maintained, or declined. Anytime you see a test decline, it may be indicative that what you're doing isn't working. Save the last 6 months before you do the test for real before you opt in any specific training.

Maintain your pull-ups, but it doesn't sound like you need much specific strength work unless your bench press just sucks.

Otherwise, pick something a stick with it. I think S&S is great. Q&D would also be great. I wouldn't mix and match at this point. Do one. Test/retest. Improve? Keep on doing what you're doing. Declined? Adjust. If you do one for 3-4 months and don't like it, then look at adjusting the program. Buy the books- or at least the one you want to try - and read them.

I would also strongly recommend limiting combat sports to 2-3x a week, preferably two. There is only so much training you can do and recover from. The older and less male you the harder it will become to keep up (less male = less male hormones, doing Qi Gong and the other stuff isn't what I'm talking about).

Keep up the yoga and meditation. That keeps your mind and body healthy too.

Everyone will have their own suggestions for what to do to succeed at something like this. I used what I just described, exchanging the kettlebells with a powerlifting routine, to do well in the military here, but that ended almost a decade ago. Feel free to PM me if you have additional questions.
 

ZuluEchoNovember

First Post
Dear Sirs,

thank you so much for your answers! It really helps me out. I am grateful for the advice.

Thanks a lot for the video. I was taking notes while watching it. And again, thanks Starlord for your effort and your answers!

Reporting on the last two months: Currently we have a lot on the academic side. Also, I will become a father within the next few days.

1: Report on Week-Plan / Session-Amount: I struggled to hit more than two different sessions per day consistently. I found it is easier from the logistical side to have fewer sessions per day and make them a bit longer without making them too hard – keeping easy sessions easy and hard sessions hard. Thanks again for that credo! Anyway, I mostly stuck to the plan during that timeframe, except for the swimming, which was not possible that often due to the pandemic, but I ran instead. I reduced the Yoga & co practice to mostly 30min per day.

2: Unit PT: From now we have Unit PT on Monday. Afterwards I hit the O-Course. We will have a swim-test in a few weeks. Currently I am able to pass it good. To make all possible test-points, I will have to put in some more effort though.

3: Report on Strength: First: My BP sucks (now: 50kg 3x10). I really have to learn the technique. I already took a lesson for BP and DL. Another one is scheduled. My DL is now at 80kg for 3x5. Pullups with 20kg 3x5. Pistolsquats with 20kg in one hand 3x5. Onearmpushups usually 10 each side - thinking of adding some light weight with the weightvest to bring it back down to 5ish reps. KBS with 20kg for warmup and 32kg for the session.

4: Report on Conditioning: I ran 21km usually within 2h10min and 2h30min on Saturdays. Once it took me 4h since I had a knee pain on the side after 7km but somehow, I thought it was a good idea to keep going. The pain went away within the next two days and it only happened once. I did an easy week of running afterwards. I also incorporated some "side plank leg raisers" in the strength work since maybe (it´s just my guess) my knee started to hurt due to it falling slightly inwards during the 21k. During the week came once a faster interval and on the other days 10k easy runs or swimming 1k. My swimming technique also sucks. That’s at least how I feel about it. I will take those swimming-lessons as soon as it is possible!

5: Thoughts on the Week-Plan: I can add a session before or after Unit PT and O-Course on Monday. On the weekend I would love to keep one day of rest in. So, I could do 2 sessions each day from Tuesday to Saturday. That would be a total of 11 sessions. 5 sessions swimming / running (or also other things like rucking - thanks Bro Mo for the hint or cycling, etc.) one of them being a Z4 or Z5 session (to be somewhat peaked for the regular Unit PT Tests we have). And 3 times strength and 3 times combat (maybe swapping one combat session for a range session as soon as it opens up again) alternating them.

6: Thoughts on Periodization: I think it would be great to have a few weeks in the year without combat, with reduced or no strength and only Z2 Conditioning with maybe some climbing in the mountains, surfing, skiing etc. I´d also love to keep the easy week thing every 3rd week or so at least for strength and combat.

7: Thoughts on the Strength Session:
a) maximal strength: I guess I will do one exercise 3x5 (except if I do KBS and not DL, then something like 100 swings) three times a week for each movement: pull, push, squat, hinge.

b) strength endurance: GTG Pullups 30reps and Pushups 100reps and to not become unbalanced some stepups with 20kg and KBS with 32kg.

c) mid-section: 20 reps each for Sideplank-Legraiser and AbWheel, Legraisers, CombatTurns (a term I think I got from PatMc for those athletic-band turns with straight arms).

d) variation of carries and groundwork / animalwalks: for warmup and / or cooldown.

Q1: Maybe I could also add some other non-maximal strength extras to c) like the TRX TYI, the neckwork, facepulls, etc. and cycle them through?

Q2: Should the exercise variation (curls, rows, dips, straight push variations, vertical push, etc.) if any better be included in the maximal strength part or the strength endurance part or both? Or is it better to only periodize / plan the variation as soon as a I will probably or actually hit a plateau?

Thanks so much for your time and effort!
Sincerely
 

Starlord

Level 2 Valued Member
Dear Sirs,

thank you so much for your answers! It really helps me out. I am grateful for the advice.

Thanks a lot for the video. I was taking notes while watching it. And again, thanks Starlord for your effort and your answers!

Reporting on the last two months: Currently we have a lot on the academic side. Also, I will become a father within the next few days.

1: Report on Week-Plan / Session-Amount: I struggled to hit more than two different sessions per day consistently. I found it is easier from the logistical side to have fewer sessions per day and make them a bit longer without making them too hard – keeping easy sessions easy and hard sessions hard. Thanks again for that credo! Anyway, I mostly stuck to the plan during that timeframe, except for the swimming, which was not possible that often due to the pandemic, but I ran instead. I reduced the Yoga & co practice to mostly 30min per day.

2: Unit PT: From now we have Unit PT on Monday. Afterwards I hit the O-Course. We will have a swim-test in a few weeks. Currently I am able to pass it good. To make all possible test-points, I will have to put in some more effort though.

3: Report on Strength: First: My BP sucks (now: 50kg 3x10). I really have to learn the technique. I already took a lesson for BP and DL. Another one is scheduled. My DL is now at 80kg for 3x5. Pullups with 20kg 3x5. Pistolsquats with 20kg in one hand 3x5. Onearmpushups usually 10 each side - thinking of adding some light weight with the weightvest to bring it back down to 5ish reps. KBS with 20kg for warmup and 32kg for the session.

4: Report on Conditioning: I ran 21km usually within 2h10min and 2h30min on Saturdays. Once it took me 4h since I had a knee pain on the side after 7km but somehow, I thought it was a good idea to keep going. The pain went away within the next two days and it only happened once. I did an easy week of running afterwards. I also incorporated some "side plank leg raisers" in the strength work since maybe (it´s just my guess) my knee started to hurt due to it falling slightly inwards during the 21k. During the week came once a faster interval and on the other days 10k easy runs or swimming 1k. My swimming technique also sucks. That’s at least how I feel about it. I will take those swimming-lessons as soon as it is possible!

5: Thoughts on the Week-Plan: I can add a session before or after Unit PT and O-Course on Monday. On the weekend I would love to keep one day of rest in. So, I could do 2 sessions each day from Tuesday to Saturday. That would be a total of 11 sessions. 5 sessions swimming / running (or also other things like rucking - thanks Bro Mo for the hint or cycling, etc.) one of them being a Z4 or Z5 session (to be somewhat peaked for the regular Unit PT Tests we have). And 3 times strength and 3 times combat (maybe swapping one combat session for a range session as soon as it opens up again) alternating them.

6: Thoughts on Periodization: I think it would be great to have a few weeks in the year without combat, with reduced or no strength and only Z2 Conditioning with maybe some climbing in the mountains, surfing, skiing etc. I´d also love to keep the easy week thing every 3rd week or so at least for strength and combat.

7: Thoughts on the Strength Session:
a) maximal strength: I guess I will do one exercise 3x5 (except if I do KBS and not DL, then something like 100 swings) three times a week for each movement: pull, push, squat, hinge.

b) strength endurance: GTG Pullups 30reps and Pushups 100reps and to not become unbalanced some stepups with 20kg and KBS with 32kg.

c) mid-section: 20 reps each for Sideplank-Legraiser and AbWheel, Legraisers, CombatTurns (a term I think I got from PatMc for those athletic-band turns with straight arms).

d) variation of carries and groundwork / animalwalks: for warmup and / or cooldown.

Q1: Maybe I could also add some other non-maximal strength extras to c) like the TRX TYI, the neckwork, facepulls, etc. and cycle them through?

Q2: Should the exercise variation (curls, rows, dips, straight push variations, vertical push, etc.) if any better be included in the maximal strength part or the strength endurance part or both? Or is it better to only periodize / plan the variation as soon as a I will probably or actually hit a plateau?

Thanks so much for your time and effort!
Sincerely
A1, face Pulls are always a good shout to balance out the shoulder girdle. Don't think a lot of rowing would be necessary due to the amount of GTG pull Ups you will be doing.

A2, I would periodize based on plateaus/pre plan. Meaning if you plan on step loading your strength training then progression is slow because you are treating your strength work as a specific skill. Only moving up in weight when you are absolutely dominating a weight. This is an incredibly recovery friendly orientated way to conduct strength training. More aggressive progression schemes are great if you are solely focused on strength and size. OR are on PEDs. However for most people and athletes balancing many training goals simultaneously step loading is a powerful tool that will prevent them from getting burnt out. So let's say you run a step loading system for 6 months and make good progress. That is a good time to start changing movements. Let's swap the bench of a standing press and the deadlift for a snatch grip deadlift. Your first session will be you finding out how strong you are in the lift and then you go back to the step loading set and rep scheme.

If you use a more aggressive progression scheme then I would advise more frequent rotations of lifts.
 

Coyotl

Level 6 Valued Member
Dear Sirs,

thank you so much for your answers! It really helps me out. I am grateful for the advice.

Thanks a lot for the video. I was taking notes while watching it. And again, thanks Starlord for your effort and your answers!

Reporting on the last two months: Currently we have a lot on the academic side. Also, I will become a father within the next few days.

1: Report on Week-Plan / Session-Amount: I struggled to hit more than two different sessions per day consistently. I found it is easier from the logistical side to have fewer sessions per day and make them a bit longer without making them too hard – keeping easy sessions easy and hard sessions hard. Thanks again for that credo! Anyway, I mostly stuck to the plan during that timeframe, except for the swimming, which was not possible that often due to the pandemic, but I ran instead. I reduced the Yoga & co practice to mostly 30min per day.

2: Unit PT: From now we have Unit PT on Monday. Afterwards I hit the O-Course. We will have a swim-test in a few weeks. Currently I am able to pass it good. To make all possible test-points, I will have to put in some more effort though.

3: Report on Strength: First: My BP sucks (now: 50kg 3x10). I really have to learn the technique. I already took a lesson for BP and DL. Another one is scheduled. My DL is now at 80kg for 3x5. Pullups with 20kg 3x5. Pistolsquats with 20kg in one hand 3x5. Onearmpushups usually 10 each side - thinking of adding some light weight with the weightvest to bring it back down to 5ish reps. KBS with 20kg for warmup and 32kg for the session.

4: Report on Conditioning: I ran 21km usually within 2h10min and 2h30min on Saturdays. Once it took me 4h since I had a knee pain on the side after 7km but somehow, I thought it was a good idea to keep going. The pain went away within the next two days and it only happened once. I did an easy week of running afterwards. I also incorporated some "side plank leg raisers" in the strength work since maybe (it´s just my guess) my knee started to hurt due to it falling slightly inwards during the 21k. During the week came once a faster interval and on the other days 10k easy runs or swimming 1k. My swimming technique also sucks. That’s at least how I feel about it. I will take those swimming-lessons as soon as it is possible!

5: Thoughts on the Week-Plan: I can add a session before or after Unit PT and O-Course on Monday. On the weekend I would love to keep one day of rest in. So, I could do 2 sessions each day from Tuesday to Saturday. That would be a total of 11 sessions. 5 sessions swimming / running (or also other things like rucking - thanks Bro Mo for the hint or cycling, etc.) one of them being a Z4 or Z5 session (to be somewhat peaked for the regular Unit PT Tests we have). And 3 times strength and 3 times combat (maybe swapping one combat session for a range session as soon as it opens up again) alternating them.

6: Thoughts on Periodization: I think it would be great to have a few weeks in the year without combat, with reduced or no strength and only Z2 Conditioning with maybe some climbing in the mountains, surfing, skiing etc. I´d also love to keep the easy week thing every 3rd week or so at least for strength and combat.

7: Thoughts on the Strength Session:
a) maximal strength: I guess I will do one exercise 3x5 (except if I do KBS and not DL, then something like 100 swings) three times a week for each movement: pull, push, squat, hinge.

b) strength endurance: GTG Pullups 30reps and Pushups 100reps and to not become unbalanced some stepups with 20kg and KBS with 32kg.

c) mid-section: 20 reps each for Sideplank-Legraiser and AbWheel, Legraisers, CombatTurns (a term I think I got from PatMc for those athletic-band turns with straight arms).

d) variation of carries and groundwork / animalwalks: for warmup and / or cooldown.

Q1: Maybe I could also add some other non-maximal strength extras to c) like the TRX TYI, the neckwork, facepulls, etc. and cycle them through?

Q2: Should the exercise variation (curls, rows, dips, straight push variations, vertical push, etc.) if any better be included in the maximal strength part or the strength endurance part or both? Or is it better to only periodize / plan the variation as soon as a I will probably or actually hit a plateau?

Thanks so much for your time and effort!
Sincerely
Think about where you are and where you want to be. The goal is to be there in 4 years. Being a new father (congrats!) can be incredibly exhausting; planning two-a-days is going to be ill-advised. Perhaps consider two strength days, two aerobic days, 1-2 combat days, and a 1-2 rest days.
Day 1: Strength
Day 2: Aerobic (30-60 min zone 2)
Day 3: Combat (or off)
Day 4: Strength
Day 5: Aerobic (60-90 min zone 2)
Day 6: Combat
Day 7: Rest - yoga and qi gong
- If unit PT is on a Monday, it might be something you could try is to have that be your day 2 and throw in a slow 30 min run in addition to that.
- Depending on your schedule needs, these days can always be shuffled.

This minimizes your time training and maximizes your ability to recover and rest, and gives you a consistent schedule that is flexible. You asked a lot about strength training questions, to which my advice is this: pick something and do it. You already have a great ability to perform bodyweight tasks for endurance, so feel free to maintain that but I don't see the value in investing time and energy in those right now. Focusing your strength training on deadlifts and bench would be fantastic; if you want to keep out of the gym, deadlift swings and one arm pushups (OAPU) would be helpful as well. The OAPU will develop more strength than regular pushups, and will teach you to stay tight. Staying tight in the bench helps you bench more.

For a lot of your questions I strongly recommend two things:
1. Set your goal. Focus on it. Keep the main thing the main thing.
2. Test and retest. If you do what you're talking about, do it for 3-4 months, and then test your events. Did they improve? Did they maintain? Did they regress? All are valuable to know. If you are not at the standard and they did not improve, then what you did did not work. Again, the big exception I have here is aerobic - I don't think that needs to be tested frequently because changing your heart and capillaries takes a lot of time, but you should still be able too see improvements on a bigger time frame (e.g. you can train longer at a given heart rate, same distance at a lower heart rate, or faster pace at the same heart rate).
 

pet'

Level 8 Valued Member
Hello,

Also, I will become a father within the next few days.
Congrats !

Your daily life may be tough due to the energy demand then ! This training may be interesting, as it will work on both sides (strength and "conditioning") at the same time, which can be efficient

Otherwise, provided you will not necessarily have a lot of time and / or energy to train, Pavel states that 100 heavy swings a few times a week are considered to be enough for "GPP"

A while ago, Dan John came up with this articl about 2x per week strength routine:

Eventually, the last two links provide very short but efficient sessions.

Last options I thought about is inspired by The Naked Warrior FAQ:
A.
You can practice GTG with the push ups and squats variations + 2x a week swings + [optional: pull up]

B.
a. 3-5 sets of 3-5 sets of a press, 3-5 minutes rest between sets (any variation of push ups, OVH press, HSPU, etc...)
b. 3-5 sets of 3-5 sets of a pull, 3-5 minutes rest between sets (pull ups, row, etc...)
a. & b. can be done in superset do get some conditioning and save time
c. 3-5 sets of 3-5 reps of squat

a, b and c can be performed 3 times a week. On the top of it, you can add the swings (2-3x a week) to get covered.

Kind regards,

Pet'
 
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