Life clearly makes no sense

Steve W.

Quadruple-Digit Post Count
Steve I just read this article posted by @krg , If you haven't read it yet it confirms my gut feeling that too much extreme endurance training must exact some kind of toll on the CVS. I've always been suspicious of that kind of training (for me) and have never been drawn to it.
MA training, which I've done my whole adult life is more HIIT and interval work which I'm very comfortable with. Again I'm speaking purely from my own 'gut feeling' on this. Also A+A is a big part of my CV health strategy too..
@Bret S.
Definitely food for thought, and does suggest that intensive endurance training is not necessarily good for CV health or for longevity (while many endurance athletes probably don't train and compete for health reasons, I'm sure many or most assume it has a health benefit).

I've never been drawn to intensive endurance training either, but I have run myself into the ground on a regular basis for many years on the basketball court. I still play, but have lots of orthopedic wear and tear that limits how often or hard I can go. Younger players often remark on my stamina, but the truth is that I can no longer really run fast enough or jump high enough to get tired.
 

offwidth

More than 5000 posts
I'm sure many or most assume it has a health benefit).
Now, that would be an interesting thing. I wonder just how many would assume this. I've been in the game a very long time, and now that I think about it, I'm not sure I could even hazard a guess as to the answer to that question.

(As you have probably gathered, I'm one of the ones not in it for health reasons...)
 

Steve W.

Quadruple-Digit Post Count
Now, that would be an interesting thing. I wonder just how many would assume this. I've been in the game a very long time, and now that I think about it, I'm not sure I could even hazard a guess as to the answer to that question.

(As you have probably gathered, I'm one of the ones not in it for health reasons...)
Yeah, on second thought, saying "I'm sure..." was rather presumptuous. I made this assumption (that highly intensive endurance training would not be harmful to the CV system) and the article linked above by @krg does talk about how the authors' conclusions have been met with defensiveness by the running community, but I should not have made an assumption about other people's assumptions and stated it with such certainty.
 
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offwidth

More than 5000 posts
Yeah, on second thought, saying "I'm sure..." was rather presumptuous. I made this assumption (that highly intensive endurance training would not be harmful to the CV system) and the article linked above by @krg does talk about how the authors' conclusion have been met with defensiveness by the running community, but I should not have made an assumption about other people's assumptions and stated it with such certainty.
Yeah, but I have a suspicion that you might actually be right! Whether intensive CV training is or isn't healthy, maybe many people just assume it is.
 

Bret S.

Quadruple-Digit Post Count
Certified Instructor
Younger players often remark on my stamina, but the truth is that I can no longer really run fast enough or jump high enough to get tired.
Haha, that's a hard truth brother, sometimes I feel like 'the little engine that couldn't'
I used to feel like I could punch trees down, now I just want to lay under it in the shade
 

LukeV

More than 300 posts
Unfortunately I can't find the study with Google but recall it was longitudinal on elite sportspeople, maybe UK or Australian Olympians, and it concluded that the super-fit do not live longer than the moderately fit. Ties in with that article

Edit: This article refers to the study. Olympic medallists enjoyed an average increase in life span of 2.8 years, compared to general population. But that is comparable to the increase you can expect from following public health guidelines on exercise

Olympians live longer than the general population ... but cyclists have no survival advantage over golfers | The BMJ
 
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WhatWouldHulkDo

Quadruple-Digit Post Count
Had to give this one a little more thought.

Question is - what is the alternative? Drink, smoke, party, watch TV, hurt people, steal?
Yes, no thanks I'll have another drink, when the occasion calls for it, if American Ninja Warrior is on, who we talking about?, and the show



:D

But seriously, appreciate all the thoughts on here. Sometimes best thing for feeling a bit off is to know other people think the same.
 

Bret S.

Quadruple-Digit Post Count
Certified Instructor
Unfortunately I can't find the study with Google but recall it was longitudinal on elite sportspeople, maybe UK or Australian Olympians, and it concluded that the super-fit do not live longer than the moderately fit. Ties in with that article

Edit: This article refers to the study. Olympic medallists enjoyed an average increase in life span of 2.8 years, compared to general population. But that is comparable to the increase you can expect from following public health guidelines on exercise

Olympians live longer than the general population ... but cyclists have no survival advantage over golfers | The BMJ
It seems to come down to lifestyle choice, exercise and taking care of yourself. Most people just do nothing as metabolic syndrome overtakes them, they go to the doctor and he/she plays whack-a-mole with prescriptions to mask symptoms as the poor b*stard slowly slides into the abyss, clueless and miserable. If people want a better life they must get off their arses and do something/anything exercise related.
 

crazycanuck

Quadruple-Digit Post Count
The real end goal for me re training isn't longevity so much as a "health span that matches my lifespan".

No loitering.
Yes, this!! When you see a 68 yr old ( ahem, my own mother), live functionally like a 88 yr old (and her sisters and my cousin are much the same way and seem resigned to that lot in life), it really makes you think. That you do not want to go there!


What's that quote by someone....to be the last one to be able to wipe your own butt? Well, to be able to do more than that too, like sit up without help, right yourself when you start to fall so you don't fall in the first place, ambulate without a walker, I could go on and on....hey at 90 I may not be able to lift like I do in my 40's, but I want to still be lifting/exercising in some regard and be still active and move under my own steam!
 

JCavin

Double-Digit Post Count
4 years ago I was a healthy 28 year old male. I was diagnosed with stage 3 colon cancer.

It was subsequently removed, along with part of my colon and I was diagnosed with a genetic form called lynch syndrome. Which makes me have a higher chance of cancer.

I workout. I live life. I love my kids. It is not for us to reason why. Only to do or die.

We’re all gonna die anyways. Do what you can while you can.
 

Marc

Quadruple-Digit Post Count
Bad things happen all the time. Worse yet they happen to good people.
The brute fact: the universe does not give a damn about it. The universe ows us neighter reason nor consolation. We are insignifficant within the context of the universe and thinking otherwise is foolish and ignorant, I would argue.
Yet, we have no choice as not to only accept whatever happens to us but embrace it.
 

JCavin

Double-Digit Post Count
In retrospect, cancer was the greatest thing that ever happened to me and my family.

Embrace the suck. Learn from it. Grow. Adapt when possible. Learnt to live, and live right.
 

Chrisdavisjr

Quadruple-Digit Post Count
In retrospect, cancer was the greatest thing that ever happened to me and my family.

Embrace the suck. Learn from it. Grow. Adapt when possible. Learnt to live, and live right.
That seriously intense, man. I'm glad you found a way to draw strength and positivity from what must have been a horrible experience.
 
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