Mobility as in superjoints

Cearball

Triple-Digit Post Count
Hey guys.

If you are training 2 to 5 times a week do you need a super joints routine?

I recently had a break from training of 2 weeks, went on a holiday & didn't do alot except for 2 hours surfing.

Any way by the end of it my back was playing up again & my body felt awful, everything just seemed to tighten up. I saw a physio who recommended stretching, within 2 days my back was better & I started training again but I can't get my body to feel quite as good as usual.

I stretch after weights & was thinking of doing mobility on my rest days. Would I be better off doing stretching or mobility on my rest days?

I own superjoints, relax into stretch & beyond stretching.

Ps. I am looking for a quick 10/20 minutes routine.

Thanks
 

Steve Freides

Forum Administrator
Staff member
Senior Certified Instructor
Yes, I do joint mobility work every day and I recommend everyone else do it as well. We each need to figure out what works for ourselves - sounds like you definitely need it, all the more so when you're away from your usual exercise routine.

-S-
 

Swinger

Double-Digit Post Count
Is is possible to adapt superjoints to work with a exercise bike? I know an elderly lady with bad knees who struggles with the squats. Would this have the same effect?
 

Steve Freides

Forum Administrator
Staff member
Senior Certified Instructor
It's not possible to adapt everything or even anything in SuperJoints to an excercise bicycle, but having said that, if you observe a few guidelines, bicycling can be good for the knees for some of the same reasons SJ gives about high reps.

- be sure fit to the bike is spot on. There are a number of parameters to fitting a person to a bicycle and you want to get them all correct. Be prepared for them to change somewhat as the rider adapts to the exercise and the machine, and adjust position as needed. Monitor foot position on the pedal, type of shoe (should have a firm sole, not squishy), saddle height, saddle fore/aft position, handlebar height, handlebar fore/aft position, distance between bars and saddle, and more!

- be sure to use low resistance and a high rate of pedalling, not a slow grind against hard resistance. The right way to do this is to find a resistance level that feels too easy and make it just slightly harder than that. Then attempt to increase cadence, not resistance. Google "ideal pedalling cadence" and do some reading - generally 90 RPM is the minimum recommended number.

- increase time only gradually. Don't look for a workout for quite some time, just look for acquiring a level of comfort in spending time spinning the pedals on the machine.

-S-
 

Cearball

Triple-Digit Post Count
You always seem on hand with helpful advice Steve!

Thanks for the reply.

That has clarified the stretching or joint mobility question in my mind.


The only dedicated stretches I have added to the joint mobility routine is a hip flexor stretch & a back stretch on all fours as the physio specifically recommended it.

Otherwise the rest is mostly mobility orientated. doesn't take too long but I tend to forgo it if I am training that day after my shift work as I figure that covers my joint mobility in most cases. I tend to stretch only after strength training. 2-3 times a week.

I initially intended to do it every day but my willpower is stretched too thin at the moment with work, exams & strength training so initially I will add it on my rest days & trial it from there. Maybe do more as & when required.
 
Top Bottom