all posts post new thread

Bodyweight Monitoring volume for pullups, dips, hanging leg raises, etc.

Status
Closed Thread. (Continue Discussion of This Topic by Starting a New Thread.)

westsider19

Level 2 Valued Member
In conjugate I monitor everything, but I haven't figured out how to calculate a number representative of volume for the bodyweight (and weighted) assistance.

Pullups - what percentage of bw should I assign to a pullup? Also, say I add 100lb, is it then simply (% x BW +100)?

Dips, hanging leg raises, straight leg abs - identical question.

Pistols/1APs - I would imagine these are ~90%+ of bw, but that is a total guess.
 

Steve Freides

Staff
Senior Certified Instructor
Elite Certified Instructor
@westsider19, yes, you add your bodyweight plus the extra weight together then base your percentages on that. Same for dips but not sure how you're using the weight for HLR and whatever "straight leg abs" might be.

-S-
 

westsider19

Level 2 Valued Member
Thanks @Steve Freides , what I mean is, if I weigh 165 and do a pullup, does that count as 165lb of volume, or percentage of that?

HLRs I was referring to ankle weights, and straight leg abs means on a GHR and with weight on my chest/behind my head.
 

Steve Freides

Staff
Senior Certified Instructor
Elite Certified Instructor
HLRs I was referring to ankle weights, and straight leg abs means on a GHR and with weight on my chest/behind my head.
I don't have math for you, but I refer you to this recent article on our web site here:


You'll notice, in the section where the one-arm pushup is talked about, how instead of weight equivalence, rep-range equivalence is used. Look at some of the online 1RM calculators - you'll see that they tell you that a 75% 1RM weight is an 8-10RM weight. You can then treat whatever amount of weight that allows you 8-10 reps max as if it were a 75% 1RM weight.

if I weigh 165 and do a pullup, does that count as 165lb of volume, or percentage of that?
If you can do only 1 BW pullup @ 165, then that's your 1RM. OTOH, if your 1RM is bw + 16 kg kettlebell, then your 1RM is 200 lbs., and bodyweight only would represents 82.5% of 1RM.

In conjugate I monitor everything, but I haven't figured out how to calculate a number representative of volume for the bodyweight (and weighted) assistance.

I don't know what your training system considers useful numbers, the above are how we calculate percentage of 1RM these different circumstances. There is, for me, no point in figuring out how much weight a bw 1APU equals because everything in my system is based on percentages of maximum.

-S-
 

watchnerd

Level 7 Valued Member
In conjugate I monitor everything, but I haven't figured out how to calculate a number representative of volume for the bodyweight (and weighted) assistance.

Pullups - what percentage of bw should I assign to a pullup? Also, say I add 100lb, is it then simply (% x BW +100)?

Dips, hanging leg raises, straight leg abs - identical question.

Pistols/1APs - I would imagine these are ~90%+ of bw, but that is a total guess.


You'll notice, in the section where the one-arm pushup is talked about, how instead of weight equivalence, rep-range equivalence is used. Look at some of the online 1RM calculators - you'll see that they tell you that a 75% 1RM weight is an 8-10RM weight. You can then treat whatever amount of weight that allows you 8-10 reps max as if it were a 75% 1RM weight.


If you can do only 1 BW pullup @ 165, then that's your 1RM. OTOH, if your 1RM is bw + 16 kg kettlebell, then your 1RM is 200 lbs., and bodyweight only would represents 82.5% of 1RM.

That's how I calculate, when I'm curious.

That being said....

The research and data on free weight lifting as it relates to loads/reps is voluminous and decades long.

But gymnastics coaches don't look at it through those same lenses, nor program in quite the same way, in part because static holds are part of bodyweight progressions, as well as slow eccentrics.

Thus, "Overcoming Gravity" has a whole separate Prillepin table for bodyweight:


As a result, I don't try to mix conjugate barbell methods with bodyweight methods.

I consider them to be separate progressions, with their own methodologies.
 
Status
Closed Thread. (Continue Discussion of This Topic by Starting a New Thread.)
Top Bottom