all posts post new thread

Other/Mixed Mountain Strong

Other strength modalities (e.g., Clubs), mixed strength modalities (e.g., combined kettlebell and barbell), other goals (flexibility)

Coyote

Level 6 Valued Member
Thanks for all the input , and advice , folks. I will let yall know how my June race goes, how I trained for it, and my fall plans.

Thanks again!
 

bencrush

Level 6 Valued Member
@Coyote

You have received great advice, Uphill Athlete is the industry standard for vertical endeavors and box steps etc. can't be beat. One other option I have used in the past to great success for vertical endeavors is the long distance tire drag. Get a car tire, weight it appropriately, and drag it for long distance (2 miles+). It mimics uphill movement almost perfectly and it is a great break for the monotony of step ups.
How heavy do you recommend loading the tire? I've heard of tire drags recently, but have wondered how heavy the tire needed to be.
 

Alaska80

Level 6 Valued Member
How heavy do you recommend loading the tire? I've heard of tire drags recently, but have wondered how heavy the tire needed to be.
Depends on what your goals are.

Muscular/Aerobic Endurance
Light weight long distances. I would just start with the tire, then as you improve add weights. Plates fit perfectly in the center.

Muscular/Strength Endurance
Medium weight medium distances.

Power/HIRT
Heavy tire short distances.

My personal weights are as follows
Light: 50-150 lbs
Med: 150-250 lbs
Heavy: 250+, the current weight of the heavy tire I have is about 500lbs. That is pulled for about 20m repeats.
 

bencrush

Level 6 Valued Member
Depends on what your goals are.

Muscular/Aerobic Endurance
Light weight long distances. I would just start with the tire, then as you improve add weights. Plates fit perfectly in the center.

Muscular/Strength Endurance
Medium weight medium distances.

Power/HIRT
Heavy tire short distances.

My personal weights are as follows
Light: 50-150 lbs
Med: 150-250 lbs
Heavy: 250+, the current weight of the heavy tire I have is about 500lbs. That is pulled for about 20m repeats.
Thanks for the reply! That is all very interesting and helpful.
 

offwidth

Level 9 Valued Member
Mountain Strong...? You tell me...

Word on the street is that David Goettler and Killian Jornet (of TFTUA fame) are planning an Everest-Lhotse traverse. Others have courted the idea over the years, but it has never been done in a true traverse fashion.
270298DF-765F-44D2-A329-BBB5A179B73E.gif
One possible route...
 
Last edited:

pet'

Level 8 Valued Member
Hello,

Here is the last article on the blog, which gives a weighted step-up protocole :

Kind regards,

Pet'
 

kurt perham

Level 5 Valued Member
Hello,

Here is the last article on the blog, which gives a weighted step-up protocole :

Kind regards,

Pet'
Sweet - ive used a step up protocol to prepare for winter adventures for many years.
 

LoneRider

Level 6 Valued Member
Recently I climbed up a local mountain, Koko Head, which is a non-technical climb that's 1.4 mile round trip with a 1,200 foot elevation gain. All that long, slow distance endurance work and kettlebell ballistics came in handy. The 5/3/1 2x/week barbell work was a sort of 'cherry on top' for my mountain strength.

I hiked it with my parents, both of whom are in their sixties.

An article describing the hike written by an Aussie blogger: Koko Head Hike
 

pet'

Level 8 Valued Member
Hello,

At the beginning, I did not think about this thread when I fist read the following article :

However, when we look at the goals and requirements, it seems that moutain and tactical athletes can share a portion of their training:
A blend of strength, power, muscular and cardio vascular endurance, with mobility and flexibility.

Overall, this article is also perfectly in line with TFTUA principles.

Kind regards,

Pet'
 

kiwipete

Level 7 Valued Member
Recently I climbed up a local mountain, Koko Head, which is a non-technical climb that's 1.4 mile round trip with a 1,200 foot elevation gain. All that long, slow distance endurance work and kettlebell ballistics came in handy. The 5/3/1 2x/week barbell work was a sort of 'cherry on top' for my mountain strength.

I hiked it with my parents, both of whom are in their sixties.

An article describing the hike written by an Aussie blogger: Koko Head Hike
@LoneRider - that is a beautiful looking hike!!!

Even better to be able to share it with your folks who are in their sixties... awesome :cool:
 

LoneRider

Level 6 Valued Member
@LoneRider - that is a beautiful looking hike!!!

Even better to be able to share it with your folks who are in their sixties... awesome :cool:
Hell it was motivating to hear my Dad tell folks who felt intimidated by the climb that if a seventy year old man can do it, they sure as Hell could.

We had a good lunch and some beers afterward (well, Mom had a tropical drink of some other flavor).
 

offwidth

Level 9 Valued Member
HEY YOU KIDS GET OFF OF MY LAWN!!!

What are peoples general thoughts on having ‘climbing’ as a ‘sport’ in this years Olympic Games?
 

pet'

Level 8 Valued Member
Hello,

I am not a climber but I am glad to see it in OG (or more generally any kind of new activities).

It is always interesting to learn the rules of a sport, elements of training in the comments, etc.. It makes us more open minded.

Kind regards,

Pet'
 

offwidth

Level 9 Valued Member
WARNING*****WARNING******WARNING
Jaded old curmudgeon rant ahead….

Climbing used to be this kinda cool counter-culture thing that was mostly practiced by edge-dwellers. This was of course way before climbing gyms. It was practiced on real rock and in the mountains of the world. There was real risk and danger involved. (Still is in some cases) Then along came so-called Sport Climbing. Which as the t-shirts used to proclaim is neither. (A sport or climbing). Then came indoor climbing on plastic. It started slow, but is now insanely popular. After a while many of these gym climbers decide they want to climb outdoors on real rock. So now we have an issue where there is a huge overuse, damage and access issue in many traditional climbing areas. Some areas have been closed, and others are now restricted in some fashion or another. Hence… ‘get off my lawn’.

Another thing is that many gym climbers go and climb on rock with zero knowledge and understanding of the safety considerations involved. Totally ill prepared. At times harming themselves, and/or others, or damage to the very resource they are trying to use. Unnecessary rescues occur. Much of this behavior results in additional access issues and closures. I have had to rescue these folks. I have had to intervene in several cases where a fatality would have occurred without my intervention.

Serious (trad) climbing on real rock and especially alpinism are some of the hardest ‘sporting’ activities known to man. Not much else comes even close.

The Olympics and other competitions only serve to enhance the popularity of the activity, thus perpetuating the issue.

From a personal philosophical perspective I just don’t like the idea of competing in this activity. To borrow from and paraphrase from Alex Lowe… The best climber in the world is the one having the most fun (not the one on the podium…)

Same applies to surfing…

Rant over….
 

silveraw

Level 7 Valued Member
Alex Lowe
I looked through his wikipedia page and holy cow... He dragged someone solo as part of a rescue at almost 20k feet. When we have to do an extraction it is usually a team of like 12 people for one person.... at less than half that elevation.
 

kurt perham

Level 5 Valued Member
WARNING*****WARNING******WARNING
Jaded old curmudgeon rant ahead….

Climbing used to be this kinda cool counter-culture thing that was mostly practiced by edge-dwellers. This was of course way before climbing gyms. It was practiced on real rock and in the mountains of the world. There was real risk and danger involved. (Still is in some cases) Then along came so-called Sport Climbing. Which as the t-shirts used to proclaim is neither. (A sport or climbing). Then came indoor climbing on plastic. It started slow, but is now insanely popular. After a while many of these gym climbers decide they want to climb outdoors on real rock. So now we have an issue where there is a huge overuse, damage and access issue in many traditional climbing areas. Some areas have been closed, and others are now restricted in some fashion or another. Hence… ‘get off my lawn’.

Another thing is that many gym climbers go and climb on rock with zero knowledge and understanding of the safety considerations involved. Totally ill prepared. At times harming themselves, and/or others, or damage to the very resource they are trying to use. Unnecessary rescues occur. Much of this behavior results in additional access issues and closures. I have had to rescue these folks. I have had to intervene in several cases where a fatality would have occurred without my intervention.

Serious (trad) climbing on real rock and especially alpinism are some of the hardest ‘sporting’ activities known to man. Not much else comes even close.

The Olympics and other competitions only serve to enhance the popularity of the activity, thus perpetuating the issue.

From a personal philosophical perspective I just don’t like the idea of competing in this activity. To borrow from and paraphrase from Alex Lowe… The best climber in the world is the one having the most fun (not the one on the podium…)

Same applies to surfing…

Rant over….
the old be careful what we wish for.
-skateboarding
-surfing etc.

Next up...skimo in 2026.
 
Top Bottom