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Other/Mixed Mountain Strong

Other strength modalities (e.g., Clubs), mixed strength modalities (e.g., combined kettlebell and barbell), other goals (flexibility)

offwidth

Level 9 Valued Member
Link to article in The Alpinist for those interested.

My favorite quote and passage
"When the COVID-19 pandemic canceled his travel plans (he was slated to go to Nepal on an American Alpine Club Cutting Edge grant to try the South Face of Nuptse), Musiyenko turned his attention to training for this closer-to-home objective. In Oakland where Musiyenko picked up a couple of contracts as an ER nurse, he would run on his breaks: about 1.5 miles for his 15-minute break, and 3.5 miles for each of his two 30-minute breaks, averaging about 8.5 miles each shift. He would do that two to three times per week."
"Co-workers that noticed thought it was nuts," he said, "but it was productive to be done with a 12-hour shift and not have to do cardio after."

Would that be Greasing the Groove for Maximum Effective Dose? :D
Yeah… I read that too… priceless!
 

LoneRider

Level 6 Valued Member
Link to article in The Alpinist for those interested.

My favorite quote and passage
"When the COVID-19 pandemic canceled his travel plans (he was slated to go to Nepal on an American Alpine Club Cutting Edge grant to try the South Face of Nuptse), Musiyenko turned his attention to training for this closer-to-home objective. In Oakland where Musiyenko picked up a couple of contracts as an ER nurse, he would run on his breaks: about 1.5 miles for his 15-minute break, and 3.5 miles for each of his two 30-minute breaks, averaging about 8.5 miles each shift. He would do that two to three times per week."
"Co-workers that noticed thought it was nuts," he said, "but it was productive to be done with a 12-hour shift and not have to do cardio after."

Would that be Greasing the Groove for Maximum Effective Dose? :D
I rather like this idea for we busy professionals and building an aerobic base.
 

Red_and_Black

Level 5 Valued Member
Another thing that can work if your circumstances allow for it is to commute via some locomotive endurance activity: walk, run, cycle, ski

Yeah as mentioned on another thread a big chunk of my training for the next 2-2.5 years will be run commute into work. Only 4.5-5km each way, but will do it 4-8 times a week and try and vary the way I do it.
 

offwidth

Level 9 Valued Member
This type of locomotive endurance work really adds up over time. (In a good way) For a number of years I had between 15km to 30km (each way) commutes by bike. There was also a certain smug satisfaction in riding past people sitting in their cars stuck in traffic.
I have also run and skied to work. And if work is close, one can always take a longer route. I know a guy who was around 5-6km from work, yet he would routinely ride 60-70km to get there.
 

Pete L

Level 5 Valued Member
I finally got around to watching this (The Alpinist) and IMHO it's absolutely amazing. The cinematography is nothing like I've seen before and the subject, Marc-Andre Leclerc, is equally captivating. The barehanded scenes flowing between intricate tooling and rock climbing were absolutely amazing. The exposure, commitment and ease of technique literally had me sweating.
I hope that everyone is off to a great new year in the mountains.
The idea of hooking his ice pick round his neck whilst he used bare hands blew my mind.
Incredible scenery and we're lucky to have been let into his world momentarily.
 

JCORN

Level 4 Valued Member
Wow just made it through this whole thread after trying a few times. I am very interested in this "offshoot" from SF as my primary goal in learning KB's (going on 7 years now) is to be better at my outdoor pursuits: MTB, downhill, backcountry and cross-country skiing, running, backpacking, etc. Lots of great content in here. One thing I was specifically looking for though was a breakdown of helpful KB programs folks have used over the years. S&S, A+A varieties, and Q&D seem to fit the bill. This also seems to be in addition to the more 'sport specific' means of training of just doing the activities one is interested in, or subbing box steps if needed. Would that be a fair summary? It gets me wondering if these types of KB programs are just great GPP and don't tax one too hard and so allow more time doing said activity (and avoid injury) or do they augment the sport itself? The last 2.5 years have been all A+A snatches or Q&D snatches for me and I did notice some nice translation to biking skill and possibly fitness. But I've been trying KB strong the last 6 weeks and got my a#@ kicked on a ski trip last week (10,000ft climbing over 18 miles in 3 days). My dilemma is to continue KB strong or not, go back to Q&D, or just try to get more time on my skis (and skins).

Any thoughts or ideas are welcome.
 

offwidth

Level 9 Valued Member
Wow just made it through this whole thread after trying a few times. I am very interested in this "offshoot" from SF as my primary goal in learning KB's (going on 7 years now) is to be better at my outdoor pursuits: MTB, downhill, backcountry and cross-country skiing, running, backpacking, etc. Lots of great content in here. One thing I was specifically looking for though was a breakdown of helpful KB programs folks have used over the years. S&S, A+A varieties, and Q&D seem to fit the bill. This also seems to be in addition to the more 'sport specific' means of training of just doing the activities one is interested in, or subbing box steps if needed. Would that be a fair summary? It gets me wondering if these types of KB programs are just great GPP and don't tax one too hard and so allow more time doing said activity (and avoid injury) or do they augment the sport itself? The last 2.5 years have been all A+A snatches or Q&D snatches for me and I did notice some nice translation to biking skill and possibly fitness. But I've been trying KB strong the last 6 weeks and got my a#@ kicked on a ski trip last week (10,000ft climbing over 18 miles in 3 days). My dilemma is to continue KB strong or not, go back to Q&D, or just try to get more time on my skis (and skins).

Any thoughts or ideas are welcome.
Well… if it were me… (and I guess it sort of is…) And if you have easy access to and ample time for the real deal (biking, skiing, etc) then I wouldn’t waste any time with Q&D or KB Strong. I would just be out in the hills getting after it, kicking a$$, and taking names. I would only maybe augment with S&S.

If you don’t have the luxury of doing that then I would do Q&D and some of the stuff from UA
 

JCORN

Level 4 Valued Member
Well… if it were me… (and I guess it sort of is…) And if you have easy access to and ample time for the real deal (biking, skiing, etc) then I wouldn’t waste any time with Q&D or KB Strong. I would just be out in the hills getting after it, kicking a$$, and taking names. I would only maybe augment with S&S.

If you don’t have the luxury of doing that then I would do Q&D and some of the stuff from UA
On it.
F7BF0055-3C32-41E5-9263-F8EAD6D48153.jpeg
 

JCORN

Level 4 Valued Member
Using kettle bells for the last few years has definitely revolutionized how I feel and move. I definitely have a lot of functional strength, something I never had before and very much needed. I always come back to asking the question if there can be too much strength to the detriment of cardiovascular efficiency. I wonder if at some point it makes sense to move into a maintenance phase of KB training and then keep the main emphasis on the activities we do in the mountains. I guess, like most people, I’m looking for a concise group of movements that can augment my mountain fitness but doesn’t take away from recovery.Does that make any sense?

Downhill powder today, uphill powder tomorrow.;)
 

kurt perham

Level 5 Valued Member
Using kettle bells for the last few years has definitely revolutionized how I feel and move. I definitely have a lot of functional strength, something I never had before and very much needed. I always come back to asking the question if there can be too much strength to the detriment of cardiovascular efficiency. I wonder if at some point it makes sense to move into a maintenance phase of KB training and then keep the main emphasis on the activities we do in the mountains. I guess, like most people, I’m looking for a concise group of movements that can augment my mountain fitness but doesn’t take away from recovery.Does that make any sense?

Downhill powder today, uphill powder tomorrow.;)
ive raced endurance sports at a high level for 34 years - MTB, skimo, nordic etc.

Im old now, 51 so keeping a focus on usable strength and limit loss of LMM is important

when in doubt I actually just roll through the SFG movements:
-swing
-clean (then add press)
-snatch
-rack position squat
-TGU's
-and dead hang pull ups.

for me 2-3 x per week as my more specific training ramps up is enough to ward off the "skinny fat" but not so much to make me sore so i cant train primary sports .
 

TrailNRG

Level 6 Valued Member
I tend to use Training for the Uphill Athlete leading up to any mountain or outdoor objective and tailor the training to match the specific requirements. When there’s nothing specific on the horizon, I’ll drop into a more generalized routine that resembles the sample week in this article. S&S has very little carry-over for me so I tend to use Q&D/A&A and more traditional strength training. In general, I feel better carrying a larger aerobic base and supplementing with focused S&C.

I’ve made the same mistake of doing a strength-based routine prior to a ski trip only to find my muscular endurance and stamina utterly lacking.

Keep those Enforcers pointed down the fall line and enjoy the turns!
 

offwidth

Level 9 Valued Member
I wonder if at some point it makes sense to move into a maintenance phase of KB training and then keep the main emphasis on the activities we do in the mountains. I guess, like most people, I’m looking for a concise group of movements that can augment my mountain fitness but doesn’t take away from recovery.Does that make any sense?
Yeah… it makes perfect sense. Although I doubt you will find a ‘concise group of movements’; there are just too many variables in play here.
I don’t get out as much as I used to… but…I will always favour training by doing any day of the week, as opposed to gym type work.
And, plus one to what @kurt perham and @TrailNRG just said, although at 51 Kurt only thinks he is old:cool:
 

JCORN

Level 4 Valued Member
I tend to use Training for the Uphill Athlete leading up to any mountain or outdoor objective and tailor the training to match the specific requirements. When there’s nothing specific on the horizon, I’ll drop into a more generalized routine that resembles the sample week in this article. S&S has very little carry-over for me so I tend to use Q&D/A&A and more traditional strength training. In general, I feel better carrying a larger aerobic base and supplementing with focused S&C.

I’ve made the same mistake of doing a strength-based routine prior to a ski trip only to find my muscular endurance and stamina utterly lacking.

Keep those Enforcers pointed down the fall line and enjoy the turns!
ive raced endurance sports at a high level for 34 years - MTB, skimo, nordic etc.

Im old now, 51 so keeping a focus on usable strength and limit loss of LMM is important

when in doubt I actually just roll through the SFG movements:
-swing
-clean (then add press)
-snatch
-rack position squat
-TGU's
-and dead hang pull ups.

for me 2-3 x per week as my more specific training ramps up is enough to ward off the "skinny fat" but not so much to make me sore so i cant train primary sports .
Well… if it were me… (and I guess it sort of is…) And if you have easy access to and ample time for the real deal (biking, skiing, etc) then I wouldn’t waste any time with Q&D or KB Strong. I would just be out in the hills getting after it, kicking a$$, and taking names. I would only maybe augment with S&S.

If you don’t have the luxury of doing that then I would do Q&D and some of the stuff from UA

Thanks for all the great thoughts. Not sure why I still don't own TFTUA, I've been thinking about buying it for years. Seems like everyone finds a maintenance program built of strength movements that cover whatever basis is needed (individual specific) then go for the hills for the rest. Sounds like a good plan to me. I'll finish the first 8 week block of KB strong since I'm almost there, then move back to some A+A, Q&D, or S&S, when I'm not able to be outside.

@TrailNRG did you write that article? I remember reading it a while ago and really liking it. It basically hits exactly what my goals are (couch readiness) although my goals would be a lot less: do a long MTB ride with 5,000ft climbing, run a 1/2 marathon, ski uphill on a yurt trip. Also me being from SW Montana make it special too. Those Enforcers are the best ski ever, so fun to turn.
 

TrailNRG

Level 6 Valued Member
@TrailNRG[/USER] did you write that article?
No, I did not write that article. The author was referenced in both the Easy Strength and Quick and Dead books and presents a pragmatic view of outdoor fitness in my opinion. I think of it as a long term approach using a minimum effective dose of strength, endurance and conditioning.
 

pet'

Level 8 Valued Member
Hello,

Usually, I tend to train following this article principles. It works extremely well, without overthinking programming. Basically, it calls for relatively low intensity and staying active everyday, without necessarily looking for "peak performance".

It has a moderate demand on the body, which makes it sustainable almost all year long. I just scale down a little when environment (work, extra-work requirements, etc...) gets to significant to allow proper recovery. However, it makes the "threshold" fairly high

It may lead to a lot of good results:
- rucking 8h+ in the mountains day after day
- all day long "heavy" gardenning (including tree cutting and related stuff)
- etc...

Kind regards,

Pet'
 
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