One-Arm Side Press

WhatWouldHulkDo

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I'm a regular side presser. For some reason it's easier on my elbow than a KB press. Some forearm weakness, I imagine.

And, of course, old Klokov is demonstrating around 2x my max there. Hooray!
 

Steve Freides

Forum Administrator
Staff member
Senior Certified Instructor
@MikeTheBear, I would call that a mostly strict press, not a side press. The old-fashioned side press, still done in the AWA, is usually performed like a bent press, slow and with a lot of lean. He does take a wide stance, and I guess it might not pass "strict" or "military" but it's sure close.

-S-
 

Tarzan

More than 500 posts
That sure was an impressive lift but as Steve said not really a side press. Maybe they're calling it a side press because he did it with one arm?
 

MikeTheBear

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@MikeTheBear, I would call that a mostly strict press, not a side press. The old-fashioned side press, still done in the AWA, is usually performed like a bent press, slow and with a lot of lean. He does take a wide stance, and I guess it might not pass "strict" or "military" but it's sure close.

-S-
That sure was an impressive lift but as Steve said not really a side press. Maybe they're calling it a side press because he did it with one arm?
I'm sure you're both correct, so I'm not going to argue semantics. It's a one-arm press with a barbell loaded with 76 kg. I wold call this lift "cool."
 

Anna C

More than 5000 posts
Elite Certified Instructor
Does anyone have a link to video of a good example of a side press, kettlebell and barbell?

I thought rotation made it a bent press, but I learned differently yesterday from a post in the instructor's FB group. But, I have never side pressed so I would like to learn it!
 

Steve W.

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IMO, the side press is a lift that is not very strictly defined.

In the traditional definition, the knees have to be locked. USAWA rules also specify that the heels have to be within a 12" base and the bar has to be maintained at a 90 degree angle to the body. But in PTTP Pavel shows it with a bent front leg, has no specific limit to the width of the stance, and holds the bar more parallel to the body, similar to the groove of a behind the neck press. Since I learned it from PTTP, that's the form I've always used.

It can also include different levels of rotation and folding under the weight, from almost a military press to almost a bent press. In my mind, the key difference between a side press and bent press is that in the side press you are actually pressing the weight upward -- even if you are folding under it to some degree, the weight is still moving upward throughout the range of motion. Whereas with the bent press, the bell may not move upward at all before you lock out your arm underneath it.

So I define the side press more by what it isn't (a military press or a bent press) than by what it is.
 

Anna C

More than 5000 posts
Elite Certified Instructor
It can also include different levels of rotation and folding under the weight, from almost a military press to almost a bent press. In my mind, the key difference between a side press and bent press is that in the side press you are actually pressing the weight upward
Yes, those seem to be the keys... somewhere between a military press and a bent press, and arm is moving as the bell is going up.

Interesting that the military press and bent press are in the SFG I/II curriculum, but no side press. I guess one has everything needed to do it at that point, but most people are probably like me and have never even tried.
 

Anna C

More than 5000 posts
Elite Certified Instructor
@Anna C, a big difference is that in the PTTP side press, one leg is bent. The traditional SP requires both knees locked, and is usually performed with a very wide stance and a lot of bending/twisting at the hips.

http://kbnj.com/pressed.mp4
OK, makes sense and good example, thank you.

I guess the only thing I'm left wondering is, if bent press is "the way to get heavier weight overhead with one hand than any other way", wouldn't the body naturally move towards bent pressing a very heavy side press? Or if the weight is light, is a side press essentially a bent press where there's no need to go to the extreme of ensuring that you bend under the weight without pressing it up?

Maybe it just comes down to what you practice and therefore become strong with.

At this point I'm guilty of spending more time typing about it than practicing, so I guess I should just try it out and answer some of my own questions. :)
 

Steve Freides

Forum Administrator
Staff member
Senior Certified Instructor
All your points are right on. Something too heavy to SP becomes a weight to BP. Something too light for the BP is a good candidate for the SP. MP = torso stays, weight moves up. SP = torso bends/leans some, weight moves up some. BP = torso moves down, weight stays.

-S-
 

Anna C

More than 5000 posts
Elite Certified Instructor
All your points are right on. Something too heavy to SP becomes a weight to BP. Something too light for the BP is a good candidate for the SP. MP = torso stays, weight moves up. SP = torso bends/leans some, weight moves up some. BP = torso moves down, weight stays.
All makes sense! The part that took me by surprise was the rotation. I guess that can be added too --

MP = torso stays and does not rotate, weight moves up during press, standing at finish.
SP = torso bends/leans some and may or may not rotate, weight moves up some during press, finish by standing.
BP = torso rotates and moves down, weight stays during press, finish by standing.
 
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