Kettlebell Origin of Turkish Getups

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Kozushi

Level 7 Valued Member
From one of the old-time strongmen manuals:

Thomas Inch, Secrets of Strength: A Dumbbell Get-up
Wow, how do you find all this stuff???

I think this quotation here shows how "undeveloped" the move was at this time:

"Perform this exercise once only, first on the right arm and then, after a short rest, with the left. In a few weeks it may be tried twice in succession, but great care must be taken, as it involves a great strain on the heart. Practical all the muscles are called into play in this exercise."

They didn't even know you could do it more than once or twice a day! Surely if it were an old move people would have figured out that it isn't going to give you a heart attack!

I'm quite sure there were weightlifting booklets published in the early 1800s, and my theory is that we would not find getups in those as they had not been invented yet.
 

Pavel Macek

Level 9 Valued Member
Master Certified Instructor
@Kozushi history of the Iron Game is one of my passions.

As for the quote, it talks about singles, not just once a day.

As for "undeveloped", we don't know - just the description is brief. Inch (and Russian Lion) Hackenschmidt were very strong gentlemen.

I am pretty sure there are close to none weight-lifting books in early in the early 1800s. Late 1800s, early 1900s? Yes.

My bet for the origin of the get- up would be travelling circuses and vaudeville, plus the grandfathers like prof. Attila and Dr. von Krajewski and their respective schools.
 

Kozushi

Level 7 Valued Member
@Kozushi history of the Iron Game is one of my passions.

As for the quote, it talks about singles, not just once a day.

As for "undeveloped", we don't know - just the description is brief. Inch (and Russian Lion) Hackenschmidt were very strong gentlemen.

I am pretty sure there are close to none weight-lifting books in early in the early 1800s. Late 1800s, early 1900s? Yes.

My bet for the origin of the get- up would be travelling circuses and vaudeville, plus the grandfathers like prof. Attila and Dr. von Krajewski and their respective schools.
Your much more informed opinion matches my speculative one perfectly. Thank you for sharing your thoughts with me.

You've attained Sinister already? I think I've got a long way to go to get there in my case, but I'm happy with where I am I guess. :(

I agree with the article about only doing it once or at the most twice before switching sides. I can't imagine doing 3 in a row on the same side! Yikes!!!
 

Kozushi

Level 7 Valued Member
It is actually just Ukraine. A the risk of sounding like a geography nazi, it is an important distinction.
Interesting and also weird how it "sounded right" for me to write "THE Ukraine" - I wonder where that came from.
 

Pavel Macek

Level 9 Valued Member
Master Certified Instructor
@Kozushi

  • Sinister swing - done
  • Sinister get-up - I am at 44, 48, 48, 44, 44.

Right now I have an elbow issue (not really injury) - Olecranon Bursitis, basically fluid in my elbow - so I have a break. Once it gets sorted out, back to S&S. The goal is still the goal.
 

IonRod

Level 5 Valued Member
Interesting and also weird how it "sounded right" for me to write "THE Ukraine" - I wonder where that came from.
"The" is used to refer to regions rather than countries. Once Ukraine was part of Soviet Union and it was a region within it, but as it is a sovereign state there is no reason to append "the" before its name.
On the topic, it is true that the cross-legged sitting position is referred to as "turkish-style" in Eastern Europe.
 

Kozushi

Level 7 Valued Member
"The" is used to refer to regions rather than countries. Once Ukraine was part of Soviet Union and it was a region within it, but as it is a sovereign state there is no reason to append "the" before its name.
On the topic, it is true that the cross-legged sitting position is referred to as "turkish-style" in Eastern Europe.
My mother was an immigrant from a Ukrainian family. I was happy to find out that Ukraine has a nice kettelbell and strongman pedigree and I share half my ancestry with those guys!
 

IonRod

Level 5 Valued Member
My mother was an immigrant from a Ukrainian family. I was happy to find out that Ukraine has a nice kettelbell and strongman pedigree and I share half my ancestry with those guys!
That is very interesting - unfortunately I don't know much about that part of Ukraine history besides the obvious legendary wrestler Ivan Piddubnyi who utilized kettlebells alot.
 

Kozushi

Level 7 Valued Member
That is very interesting - unfortunately I don't know much about that part of Ukraine history besides the obvious legendary wrestler Ivan Piddubnyi who utilized kettlebells alot.
Probably lots more guys. It's part of the strength culture over there.
 

Smile-n-Nod

Level 5 Valued Member
"The" is used to refer to regions rather than countries.
But I would say that "I live in the United States" rather than "I live in United States." Of course, United States is not really a name, per se, rather a description that has become a name. Maybe I should just say that I live in Usa (pronounce oo-suh).
 

Kozushi

Level 7 Valued Member
But I would say that "I live in the United States" rather than "I live in United States." Of course, United States is not really a name, per se, rather a description that has become a name. Maybe I should just say that I live in Usa (pronounce oo-suh).
Speaking of that, I am an American too, being a Canadian, and I think Mexicans and Brazilians are also Americans. This really means something to me as there is something particular about living on the American landmass whether it be North or South America. We all share certain things in common regarding history, culture and stuff like that.
 

Smile-n-Nod

Level 5 Valued Member
Speaking of that, I am an American too, being a Canadian, and I think Mexicans and Brazilians are also Americans.
Very true. I don't think we"Usans" have a simple, short, clear name for ourselves, so we use Americans. It's not technically correct, but at least it's part of the longer, official name of our country. And it's easier to say than United Statesers.

Here's a Wiki article on the subject:

Names for United States citizens - Wikipedia

A lot of people have wrestled with this problem.
 
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IonRod

Level 5 Valued Member
But I would say that "I live in the United States" rather than "I live in United States." Of course, United States is not really a name, per se, rather a description that has become a name. Maybe I should just say that I live in Usa (pronounce oo-suh).
That's strange that it sounds more natural to you. Perhaps it is a special case for "united" countries. United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, Union of Socialist Soviet Republics. It feels like these countries have there own titles.
 

Smile-n-Nod

Level 5 Valued Member
That's strange that it sounds more natural to you. Perhaps it is a special case for "united" countries. United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, Union of Socialist Soviet Republics. It feels like these countries have there own titles.

I'm sure it's just what I'm used to hearing on a regular basis.

I agree with the "titles" remark. Some of those names (including that of my own country) feel about as clunky as the idea of referring to the woman I married as "The Wife" instead of "Maureen." (I'll try that some time when I introduce my wife and let you know how it goes...)
 
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Glen

Level 6 Valued Member
Think that's very true. Being British I would say I live in The united kingdom or I live in Great Britain
 

Egtr

First Post
Hi guys, this movement had been used by the rookie wrestlers in order to have permisson to wrest aganist with pro wrestlers in Turkey. The rookies who accomplished this movement with 45 kg KB would have right to wrest with the professionals.
 
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