Kettlebell Origin of Turkish Getups

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Kozushi

Level 7 Valued Member
Hi guys, this movement had been used by the rookie wrestlers in order to have permisson to wrest aganist with pro wrestlers in Turkey. The rookies who accomplished this movement with 45 kg KB would have right to wrest with the professionals.
Oh! That's an important piece of the puzzle right there then!
 

Manuel Fortin

Level 6 Valued Member
I can't imagine doing 3 in a row on the same side! Yikes!!!

@Kozushi You should try it if you like the getup. You of course have to reduce the weight. I learned many things about the movement doing sets of 2-4. I can meet the Simple getup standard (with a 32), and doing sets of 2-3 with the 24 was an eye opener. Somehow, technique gets better after each rep for me. I can no longer cheat and rush through sticking points with momentum and as the stabilizers get tired, having an optimal alignment comes naturally. Of course, a getup to failure is probably a very bad idea, but just doubles with a weight about 50-60% of your max is more than doable and very instructive.

Here is an article from this site about them:
How to Get Better at Everything by Training Multiple Get-Ups
 

Kozushi

Level 7 Valued Member
Wait guys, I can't believe we missed this. If the footage tells us anything, we need not look any further than Ancient Rome:
Live footage from Ancient Rome, hehehe!
Maybe in the end the getup is just a logical natural movement of getting up holding onto something heavy with one hand. The human body is what creates the getup, not a particular culture or time period.

It's like wrestling moves - they're logical outcomes of the human body.
 

jca17

Level 5 Valued Member
Hey @NoahMarek ! Sorry I never got back to this thread to explain after dropping that video off haha.
It's actually from a scene in Stanley Kubrick's Spartacus in 1960! It was on TV, and I've heard the famous themes from it on unity etc, so I figured I'd sit back and watch this alleged classic. I enjoyed it, but was particularly pleased and caught off guard to see that human getup in the corner of the screen while a character is reciting poetry :D
Had to pause, rewind and record the clip for this forum to enjoy. I wonder who on the crew decided to add that detail. I don't think we have any records of getups going back that far, but why not include it? These guys are all gladiators, left on their own purposefully primitive ways of getting strong.
 

Kozushi

Level 7 Valued Member
Hey @NoahMarek ! Sorry I never got back to this thread to explain after dropping that video off haha.
It's actually from a scene in Stanley Kubrick's Spartacus in 1960! It was on TV, and I've heard the famous themes from it on unity etc, so I figured I'd sit back and watch this alleged classic. I enjoyed it, but was particularly pleased and caught off guard to see that human getup in the corner of the screen while a character is reciting poetry :D
Had to pause, rewind and record the clip for this forum to enjoy. I wonder who on the crew decided to add that detail. I don't think we have any records of getups going back that far, but why not include it? These guys are all gladiators, left on their own purposefully primitive ways of getting strong.
Correct. Ancient Athletics is a specialization of mine, and there is no proof of the Turkish Getup move having existed in ancient times. One explanation is simply that they did not have things that were convenient or safe to lift like a kettelbell or even dumbbells of respectable weight or of convenient shape. Lack of evidence is of course not evidence of lack, but still in this case we have no proof of the move.
 

MikeTheBear

Level 7 Valued Member
I could easily see some guy thinking, like hey, I'm tired and lying down on my back next to my weight, why don't I try to press it and then stand up with it?

I would agree with this. I'm sure many interesting as well as unfortunate things happened shortly after someone uttered the phrase "Hold my beer."

images
 

Neuro-Bob

Level 9 Valued Member
I would agree with this. I'm sure many interesting as well as unfortunate things happened shortly after someone uttered the phrase "Hold my beer."

images
I’m told that everyone was paleo back then, so I don’t think they would have even touched beer. Probably more apt to assume “hold my legumes”
 

Papa Georgio

Level 6 Valued Member
I would agree with this. I'm sure many interesting as well as unfortunate things happened shortly after someone uttered the phrase "Hold my beer."

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I found on google. I guess its called the Bavarian Get Up. Maybe you you have to chug after each "successful" rep. I'd hate to spill a good beer and break a good glass. I would probably practice with Hamms in a solo cup.
 

Kiacek

Level 7 Valued Member
The Spartacus Getup is interesting, I had to keep re-watching the clip to figure out what he was doing.
I'm definitely going to start playing with these in my off days.

@jca17 thanks for posting this.
 

Kiacek

Level 7 Valued Member
Screenshot_20180406-174837.png
You mean with humans?

Lol, no I'm not strong enough to pull off a human getup.

In the video the guy is in a position that looks like from roll to elbow he tucked his straight leg as close to his body as he could while letting the knee point forward, and let his driving leg go flat to the ground (like you see when someone is doing a very heavy getup) then posted from that position while extending his hips.
Then (this is the part actually in the video) he performed a leg switch (like you see in wrestling when someone is shooting a leg) to get his support leg into the forward lunge position.

 

Kozushi

Level 7 Valued Member
Indian Get-Up: A picture from a small temple in Akhara.

Source: Hanuman Power: A Guide to the Ancient Strength Traditions of India.
What's the date for the image, and did the fellow there have knowledge of Western strength traditions?

One glaring example of misattributing culture is with the old Celtic figurines and statuettes from 1500 years ago apparently showing guys meditating Buddhist-style, even Celitc god-looking guys with antlers and stuff. This led to some nifty neo-Celtic spiritual speculation about the use of meditation in Celtic religious traditions. In any case, so far the most convincing explanation for these figurines was that they were fakes meant to look like genuine imports from the Far East, to sell to other dummies in Northern Europe who couldn't tell locally produced forgery from genuine import.

Given that this photo is the only one of its kind, my working assumption according to Occam's Razor is that this Indian gentlemen learned the move from British strongmen - India was after all part of Britain for hundreds of years.
 

Pavel Macek

Level 9 Valued Member
Master Certified Instructor
What's the date for the image, and did the fellow there have knowledge of Western strength traditions?

One glaring example of misattributing culture is with the old Celtic figurines and statuettes from 1500 years ago apparently showing guys meditating Buddhist-style, even Celitc god-looking guys with antlers and stuff. This led to some nifty neo-Celtic spiritual speculation about the use of meditation in Celtic religious traditions. In any case, so far the most convincing explanation for these figurines was that they were fakes meant to look like genuine imports from the Far East, to sell to other dummies in Northern Europe who couldn't tell locally produced forgery from genuine import.

Given that this photo is the only one of its kind, my working assumption according to Occam's Razor is that this Indian gentlemen learned the move from British strongmen - India was after all part of Britain for hundreds of years.

I don't know, but - India has a very rich variety of S&C methods, so I would say it may be legit. Of course, Sandow has traveled to India, and had a pretty big influence there. Who knows.
 

Kozushi

Level 7 Valued Member
I don't know, but - India has a very rich variety of S&C methods, so I would say it may be legit. Of course, Sandow has traveled to India, and had a pretty big influence there. Who knows.
The ancient Romans dressed in Chinese silk robes, for instance - kind of breaks a lot of the imagery we have conjured up in our minds of them.
 
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