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Other/Mixed Original Strength: Im a Believer

Other strength modalities (e.g., Clubs), mixed strength modalities (e.g., combined kettlebell and barbell), other goals (flexibility)

offwidth

Level 9 Valued Member
I was more curious because I did OS resets daily for around 4 weeks and didn't notice any benefits. Was wondering if I just didn't stick with it long enough or if it just isn't for me.
I think that’s a fair question. I do resets as a part of my mobility work (maybe not daily), and I’ve found it hard to judge what value they provide me. I ‘think’ they do; it’s just that I can’t quite put my finger on it.
 

CoreyW

Level 5 Valued Member
The rocking has helped me the most. Like others have said you might not feel much different initially, but stopping for a while and coming back to it I definitely noticed my legs had stiffened back up. I will not do that again! I’m 47 and have a physically demanding job(lobstering in maine) and wish I had bought the OS book sooner.
 

Birddog

Level 1 Valued Member
Does anyone have any thoughts on what the minimum effective dose is for OS resets?
One thing that helped me (YMMV) was focusing on the details of the resets. My first go-around with them I didn't focus on my breathing, tongue, or keeping my chest high. This time I make sure to check all those boxes and thats been the game changer. Especially the chest high, it feels great on my back to crawl with my chest push up. Not saying you didnt already do those things but that was my experience.
 

Pavel Macek

Level 9 Valued Member
Master Certified Instructor
I love OS but have always struggled to find a way to stay consistent with it. I've been doing @Pavel Macek's Great Gama Protocol for a couple months now and highly recommend it for those who like a more regimented routine (I'm very consistent when I have a set program to follow).

It incorporates OS movements and OS-like movements and lots of ground work, which is amazing. I'll occasionally add some crawling, deadbugs or other contralateral movements if I'm looking for something else to do but the program itself covers a lot of bases.
Thank you for your report and kind words, I am glad you enjoy the GGP benefits.
 

silveraw

Level 7 Valued Member
This will sound strange to those who know me -

While it's true within the OS system there's "good, better, and best," there is a group of people I've worked with over the last decade that need "something more systematic" to even experience "good."

These are people who the Resets, or the regressions taught to the instructors, don't seem to work for.

You may be one of those people.
I'd believe that.
I did a Z health workshop once. Literally everyone else was having drastic results with the exercises right in front of my eyes. Meanwhile I was over in the corner with zero change in the mobility tests after each exercise. The guy next to me would do an exercise and gain a foot of hamstring flexibility/mobility in a couple minutes.
 

Steve W.

Level 8 Valued Member
I did a Z health workshop once. Literally everyone else was having drastic results with the exercises right in front of my eyes. Meanwhile I was over in the corner with zero change in the mobility tests after each exercise. The guy next to me would do an exercise and gain a foot of hamstring flexibility/mobility in a couple minutes.
IMO, Z Health was a bit of a scam, although I have no basis for accusing it of intentional and conscious dishonesty. It had some good ideas, things that worked in some ways for some people -- and some of those ideas are integrated into OS, or overlap with OS -- but with a very different mentality and presentation.

Z Health was presented as a very comprehensive and universally effective system, with a very direct cause and effect relationship between drills and their results, in a way that I think was very unrealistic and inaccurate.

There were all kinds of expensive trainings and levels to access secret, magic (I mean SCIENTIFIC) knowledge. And the knee jerk response to any lack of results was, "You're doing it wrong," or "You need more advanced training." There was a lot of Kool-Aid being imbibed.

OS is presented in a much more open, accessible, and realistic way, with more of a generous, exploratory, and playful spirit. It's more, "Try this and see how it feels." There's an ethos of having fun exploring different ways the body can move (and it's hard to believe that having fun exploring different ways the body won't have some kind of positive effect on almost everyone). It's not a mindset of dysfunction (you're broken) and correction, or right and wrong.
 

Bauer

Level 7 Valued Member
OS is presented in a much more open, accessible, and realistic way, with more of a generous, exploratory, and playful spirit. It's more, "Try this and see how it feels." There's an ethos of having fun exploring different ways the body can move (and it's hard to believe that having fun exploring different ways the body won't have some kind of positive effect on almost everyone). It's not a mindset of dysfunction (you're broken) and correction, or right and wrong.
Yes, I would say that the principles (well, or Tim'isms) are far more important than the resets.

"It feels good to feel good". "We are designed to be strong" , etc.

And the three pillars of movement: diaphgramatic breathing, cross-lateral movement, vestibular stimulation (head control).

If this is applied with a spirit of play everything can become a reset (as showcased by Tim Anderson on their youtube channel).

(Personally I gravitate towards rolling and twisting movements plus various forms of marching and neck nods. Rocking and dead bugs sometimes bug my knees and lower back respectively.)
 

Mark Limbaga

Level 8 Valued Member
Elite Certified Instructor
One thing that helped me (YMMV) was focusing on the details of the resets. My first go-around with them I didn't focus on my breathing, tongue, or keeping my chest high. This time I make sure to check all those boxes and thats been the game changer. Especially the chest high, it feels great on my back to crawl with my chest push up. Not saying you didnt already do those things but that was my experience.
Bingo sometimes even if we have earned the right to "progress" so to speak, by dialing back and really focusing on the details we get more out of the reset
 

bluejeff

Level 6 Valued Member
I have found that by playing with my posture during crawling and rocking I have seen more benefit. During crawls and rocks, instead of “chest high” I push harder into the ground with my hands which gives more protraction and consequently creates less “arch” in my lower back. It helps my shoulder stability a ton, and I find that the arch created in my body by crawling chest up is not the same as the arch that feels best while standing and walking. So I think that maybe some peoples’ proportions might play a role in how each reset/exercise affects them.

As said by others, one of the great things about OS is the emphasis on exploration of movement. That alone is something that can teach one a great deal about their own body.
 

Benjamin Renaud

Level 7 Valued Member
I'd believe that.
I did a Z health workshop once. Literally everyone else was having drastic results with the exercises right in front of my eyes. Meanwhile I was over in the corner with zero change in the mobility tests after each exercise. The guy next to me would do an exercise and gain a foot of hamstring flexibility/mobility in a couple minutes.
I had the same experience at my OS workshop. I was already very mobile and had been practicing the resets for a few months already. I didn't get any "Ah ha!" moments from OS resets, while others at the workshop did.

When I look back though, the times in my 8 year training career that I felt the best were when I was doing crawling regularly. I think it just made me more resilient and capable, as long as I didn't overdo it.

Crawling is the only reset that got pushed out of my routine because of injuries and I regret not having brought it back in sooner.

Rocking also played a huge part in rehabbing some knee issues. Rolling helped my TGU. Tons of small benefits everywhere in OS.
 

Benjamin Renaud

Level 7 Valued Member
I think that’s a fair question. I do resets as a part of my mobility work (maybe not daily), and I’ve found it hard to judge what value they provide me. I ‘think’ they do; it’s just that I can’t quite put my finger on it.
If you've practiced crawling did you find it brought anything to your climbing?
 

TrailNRG

Level 6 Valued Member
If you've practiced crawling did you find it brought anything to your climbing?
Nada! However, that doesn't mean that you shouldn't try it and see for yourself. My guess is if you have any shoulder issues that impact your mobility that it could be relevant. I do a lot of shoulder mobility due to prior injuries , so I feel that might preclude me from gaining any benefit from OS related to climbing. For me it's hanging and calf related work that has the most transfer / benefit in my mid-50's.
Also, check out the Mountain Strong thread for more climbing related info.
 

Lotto

Level 5 Valued Member
Is the reset reloaded book worth a purchase or can most of it be found on YouTube?
 

bluejeff

Level 6 Valued Member
@Lotto i found the book to be very helpful in understanding the OS approach. YouTube has a lot of reset variations and exercises and so forth, but without a lot of digging I have not found a place that explains the reasoning behind OS as well as the book. It’s an easy read, and if you have a kindle it can be purchased that way for pretty cheap. Worth a read in my opinion.
 

blad51

Level 5 Valued Member
Is the reset reloaded book worth a purchase or can most of it be found on YouTube?
Respectfully, if you want the program, you should buy the book. None of theses trainers that we all love and respect are getting fabulously wealthy putting out these programs. If you like the trainers or the programs, you should support them by purchasing their products. Supporting our innovators is how we keep our community thriving and vibrant.

Just to register another opinion, I love the OS Resets. They are an integral part of my weekly routine.
 

spc

Level 1 Valued Member
I do a fair amount of crawling.
I used to live in a skyscraper (16th floor) for 5 years and I crawled all floors down in shaolin style , before running.
Now I take steps on my runs where ever I find them. Running up, crawling down, run to the next set of stairs and so on...
Lately I started rucking and I implement some crawls with the load as well. THIS really is something different. Forward is okeyish, but backwards is really hard, though.
More practice/fight orientated with much benefits to mobility and spine health is in my opinion Systema groundwork. Falling, rolling, twisting, getting up. The Russian Bicycle The whole lot..
 

Benjamin Renaud

Level 7 Valued Member
I do a fair amount of crawling.
I used to live in a skyscraper (16th floor) for 5 years and I crawled all floors down in shaolin style , before running.
Now I take steps on my runs where ever I find them. Running up, crawling down, run to the next set of stairs and so on...
Lately I started rucking and I implement some crawls with the load as well. THIS really is something different. Forward is okeyish, but backwards is really hard, though.
More practice/fight orientated with much benefits to mobility and spine health is in my opinion Systema groundwork. Falling, rolling, twisting, getting up. The Russian Bicycle The whole lot..
The Systema groundwork reminded me of some flows Ryan from GMB does.
 
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