Original Strength - Pressing RESET Workshop

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Kettlebelephant

Level 6 Valued Member
Hi guys and gals!

I know a lot of you are familiar with the OS system from reading the books and we actually have one or two certified instructors in our community, so I thought I'd share my experience from the Pressing RESET Workshop earlier today.

I live in Germany and there are not that many courses or certs around here (of any kind), so I was very excited to hear that there's going to be an OS workshop in my home-country and even better less than 1 hour away from where I live.
The workshop was held by Patrick Gililov, who's the first and I think still only certified OS coach here in Germany and of course the man Tim Anderson himself.
We were a group of 25 people from their early twentys up to around 60 years old and varying backgrounds. Some coaches, some personal trainers and some (like me) who only did the workshop for themselves to get a better understanding of the material. A good amount of the people were Kettlebell practioners, so there was a lot to talk about.

We started with a little introductory round and the basic thoughts behind the OS system. Tim explains this very well and in the same way he does in his youtube videos. He explains things in a way that is easy to understand and always has a smile on his face which is kind of contagious. The atmosphere in the room was very calm and friendly, because of this. He and Patrick are just super nice.
I was actually very surprised that, without 1-2 exceptions, all of the explaining was done in English. Of course Patrick was there to translate, but it wasn't really needed.

The workshop was structured around the 5 basic resets (breathing, head movement, rolling, rocking, crawling) and their regressions and progressions.
We started with the first reset: Breathing.
I never payed much attention to just breathing during my own OS practice, because I read the books and I was breathing with my diaphragm (into my belly) already anyway.
I was so wrong. Focusing on just my breath was eye opening. We had to choose 1-3 exercises as our baseline exercises.
After every reset or the regression/progression of that reset we had to test those exercises to see whether they improved, stayed the same or got worse.
I chose the squat and toe touch.
The first reset was lying on the back, pulling your knees to the chest, holding them there with your hands and just breathing into your belly for about a minute.
Just this increased both of my baselines tremendously. I went from a squat, that would barely pass as a 2 on the FMS to almost a 3 and gained a few inches on my toe touch.
As we progressed through the variations both baselines improved further.
Some of the regressions/progressions made my baseline tests worse, though. Tim explained that we are all different and that a reset that is good for one person could be bad for another. That's why he uses the baseline test.
So for me some of the variations could be either just not for me or I'm simply not ready for them yet, he told me.

We progressed from breathing to head movement and then rolling. Every step took about 50min and then we had a 10min break to drink and reflect on the things we just learned, before moving to the next reset.
After the first three resets we had an one hour lunch break during we all got to know each other better.
Before continuing with rocking we took a group foto.
Tim said we have to do it now, because we all still look good and fresh now and that it wouldn't be the case after rocking and especially crawling, because this would involve a lot of sweating :D He was right :D
We went through rocking and crawling and then after 6 hours the workshop was over.

For me the most important part was really the time before the lunch break. I never payed much attention to breathing or head movement, but it turns out the most simple resets can be the most powerful.
Not just for me, but for a lot of the others aswell.

You really get a much deeper insight into the material than from just reading the books and I recommend that if you have the chance to attend a workshop, do it! It's really that great.
This experience also made me think about saving money to attend the SF Kettlebell and SF Bodyweight 1-day courses.
There are so much details that books or the forum can't teach you.

At the end of the workshop I talked to Tim and was pleasently suprised about one thing.
I went to the workshop under the impression that it's a course, similar to e.g. the 1-day SF Kettlebell, Bodyweight or Barbell course, where you learn about the exercises etc. but you won't achieve a certification, because for that you have to attend the SFG, SFB or SFL.
Then Tim told me about the online test, that will be available in a couple of days and if I pass it I'm going to be a certified OS Level 1 Coach :)
So this workshop isn't "just" a course, but one half of the OS cert.

Have a nice weekend you all!
K-phant
 
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Anna C

Level 9 Valued Member
Elite Certified Instructor
Very nice writeup! I like the part about baselines and testing. And yes, breathing is powerful...
 

Steve Freides

Staff
Senior Certified Instructor
Elite Certified Instructor
Tim is such a nice guy. At the first CK-FMS certification, which was 2007, if memory serves, we worked in small groups, and mine consisted of Dan John, Tim, and me. I think Tim scored a 21 on the FMS.

-S-
 

Kettlebelephant

Level 6 Valued Member
Tim is such a nice guy. At the first CK-FMS certification, which was 2007, if memory serves, we worked in small groups, and mine consisted of Dan John, Tim, and me. I think Tim scored a 21 on the FMS.
Must have been so nice to do that together with Tim and Dan :)
Yeah you can really get jealous when you see how effortlessly Tim moves into very deep squats and other positions while talking and explaining. No wonder he scored a 21.
 

Steve Freides

Staff
Senior Certified Instructor
Elite Certified Instructor
Yup. I'm good in the hips, but my shoulder/overhead stuff is where I lack. I still, even after gradually improving over the last decade, score a 1 on the FMS shoulder reach test. Making 2 is my goal!

-S-
 

Steve W.

Level 6 Valued Member
Tim is such a nice guy. At the first CK-FMS certification, which was 2007, if memory serves, we worked in small groups, and mine consisted of Dan John, Tim, and me.
I had lunch with Dan and Tim at the first Easy Strength seminar (I met you there too, @Steve Freides, although it was more in passing, and I'm not sure I properly introduced myself), and then did a two-day OS workshop with Tim a couple of years later. Dan and Tim are both super nice guys, and not just in the casual, "Yeah, he's a nice guy" way -- they both give off a vibe of unusual and exceptional kindness and generosity.
 

Jan

Level 4 Valued Member
@Kettlebelephant :
The workshop was near Köln, right? I was planning to attend (not that far a drive from Brussel, Belgium), but life got in the way (it usually does). Next time I guess.
Thanks for the write-up :)
 
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