Off-Topic Over Charged Nervous System

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Deleted member 17039

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I had surgery on my compressed ulna nerve years ago and as of late, my entire nervous system in my body seems OVER-CHARGED.

It's like it wants to respond quick and does respond quick and seems to have pent up energy in it ready to ignite.

It does not hurt. It's all over my body like my entire body wants GO.

Does anyone know how to clam a nervous system so it's not so super charged.

Stretching helps, walking helps, thank you.
 

william bad butt

Level 6 Valued Member
I feel this way too. I think it is more psychological though.

For me, heavy lifting. Low reps, high intensity.
If a training session gets delayed a day or 2 due to inconveniences, sometimes I feel like a battery at max charge!
 

Bauer

Level 6 Valued Member
I had surgery on my compressed ulna nerve years ago and as of late, my entire nervous system in my body seems OVER-CHARGED.
Interesting. How come you trace this to the ulnar nerve surgery?

Actually, I cannot relate to this feeling, my batteries feel pretty low most of the time 😁 But my ulnar nerve flips over the bone and my orthopedist doc indicated that I might need surgery if I develop to many problems from it.
 
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kiwipete

Level 7 Valued Member
I had surgery on my compressed ulna nerve years ago and as of late, my entire nervous system in my body seems OVER-CHARGED.

It's like it wants to respond quick and does respond quick and seems to have pent up energy in it ready to ignite.

It does not hurt. It's all over my body like my entire body wants GO.

Does anyone know how to clam a nervous system so it's not so super charged.

Stretching helps, walking helps, thank you.

Some ideas...

# I've found a combination of breathing drills with stretching - and with gentle walking ideal.

Typically equal inhale to exhale time ratio, 'box' breathing or long exhale drills. Play with it, see what works best for you.

# Paul Chek talks about 'Working in'. Basically gentle movement with anatomically matched breathing.

An example of this is slow body weight only squats, exhaling gently as you descend, and inhaling gently as you rise. Aim for little to no increase in heart rate. Pick any movements that are comfortable.

# Another way is to sit in a quiet spot, relax your gaze - aka peripheral vision / wide vision. This taps into your parasympathetic nervous system nicely.

# Warm / hot showers

# Listening to binaural beats music

# Watching stand-up comedy

# Walking in the mountains / hills/ forests - nature

YMMV 👍
 
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Anna C

Level 9 Valued Member
Elite Certified Instructor
An example of this is slow body weight only squats, exhaling gently as you descend, and inhaling gently as you rise. Aim for little to no increase in heart rate. Pick any movements that are comfortable.

+1... I would bet this is quite helpful. This is an anatomical breathing match, often used in yoga. Inhale when the body opens, exhale as it closes or contracts. Very relaxing, and good for bringing more parasympathetic NS activity ("rest and digest"), decreasing stress response from the sympathetic NS ("fight or flight").

Even better if you increase the length of the exhale and pause after the exhale before inhaling again.

Anatomical breathing match is the the opposite of what we often use in lifting which is the bio-mechancal breathing match where we exhale on the exertion (for example, kettlebell swing) or inhale and hold the breath (barbell squat/deadlift).
 

Molson

Level 5 Valued Member
I had surgery on my compressed ulna nerve years ago and as of late, my entire nervous system in my body seems OVER-CHARGED.

It's like it wants to respond quick and does respond quick and seems to have pent up energy in it ready to ignite.

It does not hurt. It's all over my body like my entire body wants GO.

Does anyone know how to clam a nervous system so it's not so super charged.

Stretching helps, walking helps, thank you.


Are you actually able to assess it’s CNS? It’s fatigue is quite overrated, or surrounded by myths. Isn’t it just overtraining?

 
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