Periodization - What does your yearly training look like?

TexasDan

Double-Digit Post Count
After a recent string of muscle tweaks and strains I dove into my training log and noticed a common theme that my training doesn't really change much and I should take more deload weeks. A lot of it is KB based with 3-8RM weights for low reps grinds and low-moderate reps for KB ballistics. Which is making think I need to work on varying my rep ranges, exercise selection, intensities, implements, etc during the year.

I'm curious how others map out their training during the year, which programs you run and why.
 

LukeV

More than 300 posts
My annual program starts in Summer with High Intensity Training style of pale ale elbow bends, anywhere from 4 to 12 reps, often to failure, and up to seven workouts weekly. Then when my belt is on it's last notch I get a burst of enthusiasm and take up Schwarzenegger style high volume, high frequency, splits plus 10000 steps per day in conjunction with the Ludicrously Low Carb Ultra Low Fat Fasting Diet (LLCULFFD) for a period of approximately six weeks by the end of which I am down only one or two notches and made angry simply by seeing people in the biscuit aisle and find myself walking past Krispy Kreme stores that aren't on the way home. Then I'm back on the pale ale elbow bends, probably just for one workout while playing Nick Cave's 'People Ain't No Good' over and over again. Then as if born anew I realise that what actually worked for me last year was two, and occasionally three, total body workouts weekly with a small number of exercises and multiple hard sets plus eating sensibly. And I'm quite happy doing that until Summer comes around again
 
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offwidth

More than 5000 posts
After a recent string of muscle tweaks and strains I dove into my training log and noticed a common theme that my training doesn't really change much and I should take more deload weeks. A lot of it is KB based with 3-8RM weights for low reps grinds and low-moderate reps for KB ballistics. Which is making think I need to work on varying my rep ranges, exercise selection, intensities, implements, etc during the year.

I'm curious how others map out their training during the year, which programs you run and why.
I pretty much steady state train at a 'maintenance' level throughout the year. But I usually have one to three significant events (big climbs or bike races) that I train specifically for.
 

mikhael

Quadruple-Digit Post Count
Actually in this year I want to implement periodization, and I would be:
  • Strenght
  • Endurance
  • Strength
  • Endurance
  • Hypetrophy
 

Oscar

Quadruple-Digit Post Count
(LLCULFFD)

@LukeV your summer cycle sounds like fun. You should add low protein to your LLCULFFD and see how that goes.

My yearly cycles have been more or less like this:

  • 6 months of chaotic life where I do what I can and dont make progress, at the end of which I realise I haven't been progressing and switch to:
  • 6 months of organized training, following a program, keeping a detailed log and make good progress.
Fortunately I end each year stronger than the year before.
 

Antti

More than 2500 posts
I plan in 2-6 six weeks blocks, a handful of exercises in each block. The basic lifts are always used with different variations. The closer I get to a meet the more specific I get. The competition lifts are typically done for less sets and reps and higher intensity, though I never stray away from reasonably heavy weights unless I want a deload after a meet or such.
 

kennycro@@aol.com

Quadruple-Digit Post Count
....my training doesn't really change much and I should take more deload weeks
Periodization Training

Periodization Training works for everyone.

It revolves around planned cycles that involve planned progressively loads for a certain number of weeks that lead a final week of high intensive training with near max loads. This produces...

"Over-Reaching"

Over-Reaching is a mild form of Over-Training. Once Over-Reaching is achieved, that particular Training Cycle is over and a new one is begun.

The new Training Cycle dramatically drop the Training Load in the exercise that you were performing and/or changes the exercises.

Recovery

The dramatic decrease in Training Load allows for recovery. Recovery is where an increase in Strength and/or Size occurs.

Not Changing Your Program

This eventually lead to stagnation in your training and at times going backwards.

I need to work on varying my rep ranges, exercise selection, intensities, implements, etc during the year.
Varying Your Program

This is what Periodization Training is all about. It is based on...

The General Adaptation Syndrome

The foundation of Periodization is based on The General Adaptation Syndrome. That meaning the body eventually adapts to every training program. Once adaptation occurs, progress stops.

Thus, one of the keys to progress is Periodization Training, varying your training.

Training Program Length

The number of weeks for a Training Program depends on your, "Training Age".

Individual new to training can make progress for longer time periods; they adapt slowly, about every 6 - 8 weeks.

Advance individual training adapt quickly; they need to change their program more often, about every 3 - 4 weeks.

Traditional Linear Periodization Training

This method break training down into blocks. Mikhael's post program is an example.

Non-Linear Periodization Training

This method is broken down in to shorter training blocks that often train different types of Strength (Conjugate Training) at the at the same time in a program. Example: Maximum Strength, Power and Hypertrophy
 

vegpedlr

More than 500 posts
My annual program starts in Summer with High Intensity Training style of pale ale elbow bends, anywhere from 4 to 12 reps, often to failure, and up to seven workouts weekly.
Hilarious! Kinda looked last summer . .

Recently relocating from sorta sunny definitely charred to the rainforest PNW has complicated matters, but this is what I'm trying to achieve:

Sep-Oct: Easy Strength and Easy Endurance (MAF) Ann "off-season" of sorts, no racing, no "training", just fun rides to take advantage of the last nice weather and easy maintenance work.

Nov-Jan Barbell max strength work, Tactical Barbell style. Maintain as much aerobic fitness as possible, been failing a lot lately on that second part.

Feb-Mar Easy Strength/Easy Endurance Base building, so low intensity, but building volume.

Apr-May More specific bike training and twice a week strength maintenance, usually a barbell complex with a little work to shore up any gaps. Short races begin.

Jun-Aug MTB! Ride as much as possible. "A" priority races of marathon length, maintain strength with the DMPM. Wasn't too good about the strength stuff lately, hoisting craft beers in the tap room was more fun than hoisting my KB.

I like having two distinct seasons, an endurance season and a strength season. It goes back to when I was into alpine skiing. The challenge is maintaining the secondary quality. Not losing too much strength in the summer MTB season, and not letting aerobic fitness slip away during the winter.
 

Bro Mo

Quadruple-Digit Post Count
I think the biggest shift in my year is just more running when it's not winter. I have a hard time dedicating long periods to any one phase block. I know I would probably be best off doing longer blocks of hypertrophy, strength, power/speed but I also have a need to be more constantly competition ready which causes me to shorten those blocks to weeks or days.
 
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