Power clean vs deadlift for boxing

Mark Limbaga

Level 7 Valued Member
Elite Certified Instructor
The power clean is a technical lift and will take a lot of practice before the trainee will get to the level he/she is using a weight that gives great feedback..

Personally, I would rather use these for power output for boxers

Push press
swings
Med ball throws and slams

Deadlifts, 1 leg deadlifts are great for strength and stability
 

Alan Mackey

Level 6 Valued Member
Power clean, front squat and push press (as a single, continuous movement with a brief pause between phases) should be mandatory for any kind of non-strength athlete. They all teach the body is one piece, the proper way to connect lower and upper body and (this is truly fundamental) optimal transfer of power (which is very much needed to sprint, jump, throw, punch, kick, wrestle...).
 

Antti

Level 9 Valued Member
Power clean, front squat and push press (as a single, continuous movement with a brief pause between phases) should be mandatory for any kind of non-strength athlete. They all teach the body is one piece, the proper way to connect lower and upper body and (this is truly fundamental) optimal transfer of power (which is very much needed to sprint, jump, throw, punch, kick, wrestle...).
I'm very much in agreement. But you mention the pause; do you think it's always necessary? I would see great value in both ways.
 

Antti

Level 9 Valued Member
It's not necessary per se, but it helps tremendously to avoid turning the sequence into a Crossfit workout.
I see. Yes, the pauseless exercise should be done more with speed and power in mind, which means low reps, and long rest breaks, the opposite of Crossfit. Not that the strength version, the paused one, wouldn't be better with low reps and long rest breaks.
 

Chrisdavisjr

Level 6 Valued Member
Of the two, I can see greater value in the power clean, if performed at a light/moderate weight as a hybrid power/conditioning drill. As much as I love deadlifts, I don't see them being especially valuable to a boxer.

That said, if a mixture or power and conditioning are called for, KB swings/snatches would probably be more effective overall as they're less technically demanding than heavy power cleans and less systematically exhausting than deadlifts.

I'm no boxing coach but I would prioritise development of sustained moderate power production over short-duration maximum power production or limit strength.
 

Alan Mackey

Level 6 Valued Member
Of the two, I can see greater value in the power clean, if performed at a light/moderate weight as a hybrid power/conditioning drill. As much as I love deadlifts, I don't see them being especially valuable to a boxer.

That said, if a mixture or power and conditioning are called for, KB swings/snatches would probably be more effective overall as they're less technically demanding than heavy power cleans and less systematically exhausting than deadlifts.

I'm no boxing coach but I would prioritise development of sustained moderate power production over short-duration maximum power production or limit strength.
I pretty much disgree with everything.

Conditioning is highly specific and poorly transferable. That's why Lance Armstrong had pretty medriocre marathon times. That's why elite crossfitters are destroyed after a couple of rounds of medium sparring or hitting the pads.

As a lifelong striker and grappler, I use weights to only become stronger, and sparring, drilling and hitting the bags to be combat-fit. LISS helps too.
 

Tuebor

Level 6 Valued Member
Cycle the two lifts, 2weeks per lift. See which one helps you more.

2-5 sets if boxing is your main focus keep your strength work to a minimum. 1-2× a week 30-60min total per week. Two lifts per strength session (Deadlift, explosive bench and or Clean pulls and push press or push jerks)

The clean pull will give you the benefit of the clean without the potential complexity of the catch. Just do t turn it into a deadlift.

Weights
Pulls 4-5×5-6 60-80%
Push 4-5×6-10 60-75%

Often times strikers don't bring the bar low enough on their chest as they punch with their shoulders. Be cognitive of that.

Good luck to you.

@Alan Mackey complex would be great for general strength, no doubt.

Low rep MB slams and tosses will also help teach your body to explode as one piece.

Edit: keep the ability to squat but unless weight gain isn't an issue I wouldnt have them as part of your strength work. Do some low rep goblet or bootstrappes in the warmup.
 
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Anatoly

Level 1 Valued Member
I pretty much disgree with everything.

Conditioning is highly specific and poorly transferable. That's why Lance Armstrong had pretty medriocre marathon times. That's why elite crossfitters are destroyed after a couple of rounds of medium sparring or hitting the pads.

As a lifelong striker and grappler, I use weights to only become stronger, and sparring, drilling and hitting the bags to be combat-fit. LISS helps too.
Wise words sir. I'll take your advice
 

Anatoly

Level 1 Valued Member
I pretty much disgree with everything.

Conditioning is highly specific and poorly transferable. That's why Lance Armstrong had pretty medriocre marathon times. That's why elite crossfitters are destroyed after a couple of rounds of medium sparring or hitting the pads.

As a lifelong striker and grappler, I use weights to only become stronger, and sparring, drilling and hitting the bags to be combat-fit. LISS helps too.
What else do you do for conditioning for fighting sports
 

Alan Mackey

Level 6 Valued Member
What else do you do for conditioning for fighting sports
Nothing too fancy.

Sparring, drilling and hitting the bags/pads are paramount. Doing that alone would suffice for pretty much anyone who is not a pro-fighter.

Then comes some basic strength training (three exercises, three sets, three reps, three minute rests, three times a week) and two or three EASY, restorative, Maffetone style running sessions a week. These two things (strength and LISS) cannot detract in any way from my performance on the mat.

No sprinting, no hard intervals, no exercising on the minute, no exercising against the clock. All my conditioning is done waving the intensity while sparring, rolling and hitting the bags/pads (which basically gets the lion's share of my training by FAR).

It's not new, it's the opposite of sexy... but, hey, it works. :)
 
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Kettlebelephant

Level 7 Valued Member
What else do you do for conditioning for fighting sports
Running.
It's essential for every stand-up fighter. The way you move around in the ring, almost dancing, is very similiar to running. So running is very sport specific to stand-up fighters.
Same thing with jumping rope.

You're asking all these questions about power cleans vs. deadlift etc. It's the third thread already...
Maybe I'm being harsh, but if I had to take a guess based on the things you ask, you're most likely not at the level of boxing to worry about such things.
Do 2 days of strength work with the basic exercises -> 3-5 sets of 5 reps of a push, a pull, a squat and a hinge.
Do 1-2 days of easy 45-90min running.
Do 1-2 days of specific conditioning like bag work.
Do your art (in your case boxing) 2-4 days.
Repeat for the next 12 months.
See results.
 
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