Real world strength?

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Marlon Leon

Level 3 Valued Member
Thank you, Steve. However, I get the feeling we have some kind of misunderstanding. Something that could be solved in seconds in real life, but would take a lot of text online.
So let's leave at that.

Best
 

Al Ciampa

Level 7 Valued Member
Certified Instructor
Marlon,

The misunderstanding is that there is no such (safe) thing as a pure hip hinge with locked knees. Even the stiff-legged DL, from the bodybuilding world, had minimal knee flexion. Hammies no like that kind of tension.

A hip hinge is "hip dominant", meaning "less" knee flexion, relatively. A squat, or low hip DL (like the first pull in the Oly lifts), is not hip dominant... both the knees and the hips are in a higher degree of flexion.
 

Marlon Leon

Level 3 Valued Member
I agree that a really stiff-legged deadlift is probably not a good idea. However, that was not the point I was trying to make. Originally I just mentioned that lifting with the legs as an advice for the job is not a bad advice for most people. But again I think if we had a discussion in real life I think we wouldn't have these misunderstandings as one could just quickly show what he or she means.

Anyway, I suggest to come back to the original discussion which I find very interesting.
Dan John just published yesterday an article on t-nation that discusses some basic capacities any lifter should possess. That is not exactly the question, but the standards given in the article are all useful for real life.

https://www.t-nation.com/training/10-things-every-lifter-should-be-able-to-do
 

Baron von Raschke

Level 3 Valued Member
Jeff, reading Naked Warrior (multiple, multiple times) made me aware of just how wrong I've been in my daily activities my whole life. Now whenever I lift something, whether it's putting kids in a car seat or lifting an awkward 30lbs bag of dog food or a sheet of plywood I go through a mental checklist: activate glutes, pull shoulders down, tense abs, pressurize abdomen. If I can't lift it after that preparation then I need to call in reinforcements. The book also made me aware of pre-tensing or bracing before an exertion using the example of dead start pushups (starting a pushup from the bottom while totally relaxed). I'm not having to go through the checklist as much anymore, as it's becoming more automatic. But the list of real world applications goes on and on. Even pushing open a heavy door sends me into checklist mode. And here I thought glutes were just for sitting, lol.
 

Rambro1*

Level 2 Valued Member
For what it's worth, the tension techniques I have learned from Pavel and the Strongfirst community, have been a game changer for me. Not only have they become how I operate in my everyday life, but have kept me operationally ready to deploy with my law enforcement tactical team.
 

Kozushi

Level 7 Valued Member
I am finally getting around to reading Naked Warrior. This book was ground breaking at the time it was written, and still an excellent read. But, since I have read several other of Pavel's books, have heard or read several of his interviews, and been active on his forums for several years, I have already been exposed to many of the high tension techniques in this excellent book.

One thing I have wondered, though. By applying the high tension techniques, one can increase their strength in various "gym exercises". But, how does that apply to lifting something out of the back of a pickup truck, a fireman dragging a hose, a mason hoisting buckets of mud on scaffolding, a carpenter framing a house, etc. Do people in what I will loosely lump into the category called "real life" apply these high tension techniques as they go about their business? Do people who increase their one arm press by clinching the fist of their free hand derive benefit when doing routine strength demanding tasks outside the gym? What about a soldier carrying a heavy automatic weapon over rough terrain for long distances?
I spent the last two months only doing Naked Warrior (although with daily pullups added in), and in Asia in fact (someone else mentioned Asians know how to squat properly due to lifestyle). I was terrifically strong and able to hike all day through mountains and to lift relatively heavy things when needed. I felt very strong and "light". Naked Warrior is amazing. Comparing it with S&S that I had done for the prior 5 months, S&S, due to the complexity of the movements, and the fact that it has a true "big pull" which NW does not, I would think that it is more complete. Naked Warrior is for anyone anywhere, but is likely going to be more attractive to people who can't access their weights. I'm still just an enthusiastic beginner at this stuff. One thing I like about weights over bodyweight is that the bodyweight exercises put my body under a lot more tension, which I find less pleasant, whereas the weights don't really feel uncomfortable. In the One Armed Pushup for instance, there is a lot of pressure that goes, not only into my head it seems, but also into my hip socket - an AWFUL lot of pressure. It creates very real and very practical strength, but it's easier, less stressful to develop strength I think with weights. Of course, the one armed one legged pushup involves a lot of balance, which again develops amazing physical skills and powers, but it's honestly a tough tough job! (At least for me as yet). By the end of the summer I was able to do 12 one armed pushups, 2 one arm one legged pushups, and 5 pistols. I don't want to lose it, but I don't think I can do S&S and NW together; I want to start ROP now to see what that is all about.
 

Karen Smith

Level 6 Valued Member
Master Certified Instructor
Iron Maiden
hello all -
sorry for being a bit late to the thread. The SF tension techniques and strength gained from doing the SFB bodyweight skills has kept my strength baseline at an all time high and has tremendous carryover to other modalities and life. I will list just a few % for you and know that many of my students have also hit nice PR's with bodyweight only training.

3 years of mostly bodyweight GTG or bodyweight practice with a very busy travel schedule has....

1. Kept all my level 1 and level 2 strength skill up without training them
2. PR's my military press past the Iron Maiden without military pressing (thank you OAPU)
3. Kept my DL at 1.8x my bodyweight without training deadlifts since 2013 (thank you SLDL demos and Pistol progressions)
4. Kept my pull up at 18kg without any weighted pull up training since IM in 2012 (thanks BW tension skill pull ups, HLR, DragonFlags)
5. Maintain a 24kg TGU without training it.

I hope that this gives a bit of insight into what our system can offer and hope to see you all at an SFB course or cert in the future. Feel free at anytime to email with questions. Happy to help and honored to teach the SFB and SFG.
 

pet'

Level 8 Valued Member
Hello,

@Karen Smith
1. Kept all my level 1 and level 2 strength skill up without training them
2. PR's my military press past the Iron Maiden without military pressing (thank you OAPU)
3. Kept my DL at 1.8x my bodyweight without training deadlifts since 2013 (thank you SLDL demos and Pistol progressions)
4. Kept my pull up at 18kg without any weighted pull up training since IM in 2012 (thanks BW tension skill pull ups, HLR, DragonFlags)
5. Maintain a 24kg TGU without training it.
Were you be able to maintain all these very good results only by doing pistol squats and OAOL PU ? Or did you do other exercises ?

Could you please tell me what progressions you are using ? Or a "typical workout ? (I am really impressed ! ;) )

Kind regards,

Pet'
 

Karen Smith

Level 6 Valued Member
Master Certified Instructor
Iron Maiden
Hello,

@Karen Smith


Were you be able to maintain all these very good results only by doing pistol squats and OAOL PU ? Or did you do other exercises ?

Could you please tell me what progressions you are using ? Or a "typical workout ? (I am really impressed ! ;) )

Kind regards,

Pet'
I mostly just "practice my skills" My travel has been about 25-30 weekend a year for the past few years. So I do lots of demos at our certs and courses. When I am home I do OA PU progressions, Pistols progressions, pullups, HLR, SLDL and sometimes add in a kettlebell set or two just to test and know I am maintaining. Hope that helps.

When I have several weeks home at a time I might write a short program for a new skill or to PR one that I haven't worked in some time.
 
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