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Barbell Replacing deadlifts with SLDL

dobie

Level 5 Valued Member
Read through thread from 2 years ago on this topic. Karen has a phenomenal video on the right way to do the SLDL. I have to agree with Karen and pavel Macek on this topic.
My therapist gave this exercise for me 10 days ago for a nagging belt line hip issue type problem.
If you perform slow and controlled like Karen says and Pavel T says it is an incredibly difficult movement and will benefit anyone getting into older age category.
 

Anna C

Level 9 Valued Member
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SLDL = Stiff Legged Deadlift? Or Single Leg Deadlift?
 
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Anna C

Level 9 Valued Member
Team Leader Certified Instructor
Elite Certified Instructor
Sinister
I guess since it's barbell I interpreted it as stiff legged.
Ha, yea I wrote "still" when I meant "stiff" (edited)

But I'm guessing he means "Single Leg Deadlift" as that's what Karen most often teaches, shares, and writes about.

But being in "Barbell" ... Yeah, IDK. That would be unusual. I guess we'll see.
 

watchnerd

Level 8 Valued Member
Ha, yea I wrote "still" when I meant "stiff" (edited)

But I'm guessing he means "Single Leg Deadlift" as that's what Karen most often teaches, shares, and writes about.

But being in "Barbell" ... Yeah, IDK. That would be unusual. I guess we'll see.

I've never done this, but:

 

dobie

Level 5 Valued Member
Anna- single leg deadlift. Also feel like 32kg single leg deadlift would activate way more muscle then than double the weight for regular deadlift.
 

dobie

Level 5 Valued Member
Also, single leg deadlift with a bell. Should have stated at beginning. Sorry.
 

MikeL

Level 5 Valued Member
Do both. One is an accessory of the other. Or do SLDL on an alternate day and reduce the amount of conventional you do.

I’d not sub it out completely, but then I’m not working on your goals.

A barbell deadlift will make you move more weight and therefore improve strength across a lot of your body. SLDL won’t. But it’ll do good stuff still.
 

John Spezzano

Level 6 Valued Member
Senior Certified Instructor
Elite Certified Instructor
I've never done this, but:

I've seen a few people over the years do the barbell version. I think they chose it because they weren't really KB people and had more access to barbells. I don't think it's awful but I prefer the KB version because it forces you to compensate for an asymmetrical load with additional internal abdominal bracing. The barbell version lets you grip the load with both hands, which automatically makes your shoulders square to the floor. Similar to the one-arm swing versus the two-arm swing, to get shoulders square with the KB version of the SLDL you must compensate for the uneven load which adds an additional element that the barbell version lacks.

All that said, I like SLDLs a lot, they are one of my main go to "corrective" exercises. I'm sure people will take issue with this but I've also done a lot of them on a stability pad, (with a much lighter load, of course). It was amazing how just a single rep on the pad woke up all of my stabilizer muscles. One rep on the pad and then reps on the regular floor were effortless.

I highly recommend you add the SLDL to your warm up if you don't do them already.
 

Kenny Croxdale

Level 7 Valued Member
Also feel like 32kg single leg deadlift would activate way more muscle then than double the weight for regular deadlift.
Muscle Activated

A Single Leg Deadlif isn't goint to activate more muscle than a Traditional Dealift.

Stabilizer Muscles

What a Singles Leg Deadlift does is increase the Loading on the Stabilizer Muscle and decrease the Loading on the Primary Muscles in the movement.
 

Antti

Level 9 Valued Member
I've seen a few people over the years do the barbell version. I think they chose it because they weren't really KB people and had more access to barbells. I don't think it's awful but I prefer the KB version because it forces you to compensate for an asymmetrical load with additional internal abdominal bracing. The barbell version lets you grip the load with both hands, which automatically makes your shoulders square to the floor. Similar to the one-arm swing versus the two-arm swing, to get shoulders square with the KB version of the SLDL you must compensate for the uneven load which adds an additional element that the barbell version lacks.

All that said, I like SLDLs a lot, they are one of my main go to "corrective" exercises. I'm sure people will take issue with this but I've also done a lot of them on a stability pad, (with a much lighter load, of course). It was amazing how just a single rep on the pad woke up all of my stabilizer muscles. One rep on the pad and then reps on the regular floor were effortless.

I highly recommend you add the SLDL to your warm up if you don't do them already.

I like single leg deadlifts on a balance board. Very nice.

All in all I agree with the notion that there's no reason you couldn't do both deadlifts and single leg deadlifts. They serve different purposes. Both great lifts. I wouldn't call the single leg one a strength exercise, though.
 

Anna C

Level 9 Valued Member
Team Leader Certified Instructor
Elite Certified Instructor
Sinister
I wouldn't call the single leg one a strength exercise, though.

I get where you're coming from, but I think I would still call it a strength exercise. Maybe an accessory, though. Like a split squat.

One way to move in the spectrum towards more of a strength exercise and less of a stability challenge is a "kickstand" single-leg deadlift. Karen does these a lot.

 

pet'

Level 8 Valued Member
Hello,

I'd do both. As @watchnerd said, you could use the single leg version for your warm up and a 'regular' deadlift for your strength training.

I've been doing single leg for a while now and noticed significant improvement in balance in various activities (trail running and boxing)

Kind regards,

Pet'
 

Kenny Croxdale

Level 7 Valued Member
I've also done a lot of them on a stability pad, (with a much lighter load, of course). It was amazing how just a single rep on the pad woke up all of my stabilizer muscles.
Strengthening The Stabilizer Muscles

The greater the Instability of a Movement the greater the Loading on the Stabilizer Muscles.

Isometric Stabilizer Strength

In a Compound Movement, the Stabilzier Muscles perform a Isometric Action

Research by McGill noted that a Strong Ridig Core ensure greater Force Production in Squats, Deadlifts, Overhead Presses, etc.

One rep on the pad and then reps on the regular floor were effortless.
That It Does

The more the Stability in a movement, the greater the Force Production; more Maximum Strength and Power.

That is one of the primariy reason that more weight can be moved on a Smith Machines, Leg Press, and other Gym Exercise Equipment.

These piece of equipment take the Stabilizer Muscles out of the equation.

The Benefit Of Gym Machines

They allow greater loading on the Primary Muscles in an Exercise; which for Bodybuilder ensure Maximum Hypertrophy.

The Downside Of Gym Machines

No strengthening of the Stabilizer Muscles occurs; which is necessary for Sports, Powerlifting, Olympic Lifting, etc.

Thus, when Stabilizer Muscle Training isn't employed it lead to...

"Leakage"

Dr Stuart McGill, one of the leading researchers in core strength, coin "Leakage" as one of the main issues of a weak core; meaning less Force (Strength and Power) are generated in let say a Squat, Deadlift, Overhead Press, etc. with a weak core compared to a strong one.

As per McGill...

Why Core Stiffness Matters

Core stiffness can be thought of as tension throughout the body that provides a stable platform for more movement to occur. Source: Why Core Stiffness Matters over Strength

A great analogy on this is...

"You Can't Shoot A Canon From A Canoe"
Dr Fred Hatfield

In other words, greater force is produce when firing the canon from a Stablie Platform.

With that in mind, it's a...

Balancing Act

1) If greater Strength is the objective for increasing Strength or Hyperetrophy in the Primary Muscles, exercises that provide more Stablity are more effective.

2) If greater Strength is the obective for increasing Stabilizer Strength, exercises that are more Unstable.


I like SLDLs a lot,

Two Types of Conventional Deadlifts

1) Olympic Conventional Deadlift

In this type of Conventional Deadlift, the weight is essentially "Leg Pressed" off the floor.

2) Powerlifting Conventional Deadlift

Dr Tom McLaughlin's research demonstrated that with this method, driving the weight off the floor is initiated with the Back rather than the Legs.

The Muscle Firing Sequence in it is: Back > Legs > Back.

Powerlifting Conventional Deadlifts
Dr Tom McLaughlin,
THE DEADLIFT: A SCIENTIFIC ANALYSIS

"Contrary to popular opinion, the initial drive is done primarily by the back (erector spinae) and not the legs. If the athlete tries to move the weight using their legs instead of their back the result is a premature straightening of the legs and an unwanted curvature of the back."

McLaughlin found that one of the most effective Powerlifting Conventional Deadlift Auxilary Exercise is The Stiff Leg Deadlift; slight break in the knees.
 
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dobie

Level 5 Valued Member
Anna,
The kickstand kb deadlift with Karen is a great idea! The regular SLDL- single leg has been a difficult move so far because of balance- should get better with more practice each rep I have been doing takes 10 seconds. Clearly this is a weakness for me- improve weaknesses and likely other things improve as well.
 
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