Rest or Push On with Soreness

David Jarrett

Level 4 Valued Member
I've been doing S&S consistently for several weeks now. Today I noticed a bit of soreness in my lats when doing getups, and some "twingyness?" in my left forearm and wrist when doing swings.

My question is this: is it better to simply work through these relatively minor annoyances (I hesitate to call them "pains") or should I take a day and rest?

Thanks!
 

mikhael

Level 7 Valued Member
@David Jarrett What you mean by "continuously"? Is it daily with no rest days? I follow S&S for 80 straight days but on every third day I do easier practice, 2H to be exact. You could follow @Minn8325 advice and perform a lighter session, or just simply take a day or two off.
 

David Jarrett

Level 4 Valued Member
@David Jarrett What you mean by "continuously"? Is it daily with no rest days?
I meant I've followed the program recommendation of five to six days per week with occasional off days. The reason I posed this question was because I'm in my third week of the program now, and I was hoping that this would be my first full six day week.

I believe I'm just going to rest for a single day today. Waking up this morning, the "pain" has already completely subsided. I think that since I'm feeling so much stronger and capable now, it's easy to forget that I'm still very much new to all this and that my body is still overcoming several weaknesses and imbalances that were/are present.

I've rested in previous weeks and am making excellent progress, so I'll just rest again to be safe!
 

kennycro@@aol.com

Level 6 Valued Member
My question is this: is it better to simply work through these relatively minor annoyances (I hesitate to call them "pains") or should I take a day and rest?
Soreness

This occurs when you have pushed yourself too far with in an exercise.

"Repeated Bout Effect"

What occurs is that eventually our body heals and adapts in time.

"Wound Healing"

The amount of time needed for recovery is dependent on the amount of trauma created.

The lower the amount of trauma, the faster your recovery.

The greater the trauma, the greater the recovery time.

With that said, some light training is effective for muscle soreness and recovery.

It increase blood flow to the traumatized muscles. Increasing circulation to the muscles delivers nutrients to the the muscles and also removes metabolites; takes out the garbage

Minn8325

As per Minn, lightening the load and performing the same exercise will help with recovery. .

This promotes...

Active Recovery

This is accomplished by training with lighter load and higher repetitions.

Active Recovery speeds accelerates recovery.

Passive Recovery

This means taking time off and doing nothing.

Recovery occurs. However, it is less effective than Active Recovery.

As and example...

Knee Replacement Surgery and Rehabilitation Recovery

Individuals who have Knee Replacement Surgery immediately start rehabilitation; Active Recovery.

That means if the surgery is performed early in the morning, later that afternoon or next day, the patient starts rehab.

The patient get up and walk, with help. The walk is maybe 10 feet with short breaks.

The same applies with other types of surgeries, as well.
 

vegpedlr

Level 6 Valued Member
Walking, yoga , and qigong. Increasing circulation of blood and Qi without adding stress really helps. Swimming is also good if you can stay relaxed enough. Many people can’t.

Active recovery is perhaps the most overrated and underutilized strategy. Wait, what?! A bit paradoxical, no? But think about it. It only works if you go easy enough, otherwise it’s just more training volume. How many of us are guilty of turning a recovery day into just another training day? I sure have. So I prefer the different activities above instead of trying to just “go easy.”
 
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