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User 7569

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Hello All I'm a 6'1 Male, 154lbs.

My current goals are to get into great (flexible strength and endurance) shape for Tai Chi Chuan, get really good at pistols, and build up my muscles/joints through high rep pushups.

I move pretty well (can wall walk, bridge, pistols) but have not had a FMS. My wrist hurts a bit from a bicycle injury a few days ago but nothing to worry about (getting better with every nap).

I'm currently experimenting with Road Work (the type boxers use) where you run in combat boots for about 15 minutes, doing things like squats, pushups, and animal walks whenever possible during the run. Besides this I bicycle and jump rope but never jog.

I'm planning on doing this at least a couple times a week for my CC, since my wrist is hurting a bit right now.

I'm just wondering if anyone has any specific advice for road work that might be useful to me. I was thinking of throwing some fast chi kung into the mix when doing road work as well, specifically push hands.

The reason I''m asking is because Matt Furey provides a very, very generalized approach to road work and I want to know what non-boxing, non- hardstyle-martial-arts trainees would do when approaching this.

I was thinking, during road work, I run and do hindu pushups, hindu squats, divebombers, elbows in pushups, arms wide pushups, some ab exercises and some animal walks whenever possible.

Still some more specified approaches from people who have done this before would be appreciated.

FYI: even though my wrist is getting better the moment I cannot do pushups because I don't want to prolong an injury. I'm going to start back conservatively once I can comfortably place weight on the wrist once again. So any versions of Road Work that are light on upper body pushing/pulling movements would be great for the time being.
 

Hasbro

Level 5 Valued Member
Uphill sprints in the 50 to 100 yard range are great. Run up the hill.....walk down the hill. About 8-12 reps with an all out effort will leave you spent so do them after all your other road work. Also start with shallower hills, fewer reps, and 60% effort if you're not used to this sort of training or have any foot related problems such as plantar fasciitis.
 

offwidth

Level 9 Valued Member
Hello All I'm a 6'1 Male, 154lbs.

My current goals are to get into great (flexible strength and endurance) shape for Tai Chi Chuan, get really good at pistols, and build up my muscles/joints through high rep pushups.

I move pretty well (can wall walk, bridge, pistols) but have not had a FMS. My wrist hurts a bit from a bicycle injury a few days ago but nothing to worry about (getting better with every nap).

I'm currently experimenting with Road Work (the type boxers use) where you run in combat boots for about 15 minutes, doing things like squats, pushups, and animal walks whenever possible during the run. Besides this I bicycle and jump rope but never jog.

I'm planning on doing this at least a couple times a week for my CC, since my wrist is hurting a bit right now.

I'm just wondering if anyone has any specific advice for road work that might be useful to me. I was thinking of throwing some fast chi kung into the mix when doing road work as well, specifically push hands.

The reason I''m asking is because Matt Furey provides a very, very generalized approach to road work and I want to know what non-boxing, non- hardstyle-martial-arts trainees would do when approaching this.

I was thinking, during road work, I run and do hindu pushups, hindu squats, divebombers, elbows in pushups, arms wide pushups, some ab exercises and some animal walks whenever possible.

Still some more specified approaches from people who have done this before would be appreciated.

FYI: even though my wrist is getting better the moment I cannot do pushups because I don't want to prolong an injury. I'm going to start back conservatively once I can comfortably place weight on the wrist once again. So any versions of Road Work that are light on upper body pushing/pulling movements would be great for the time being.
I have practiced Tai-Chi for a number of years,(probably far less than you) but have many, many more practicing Iaido, and Kenjutsu. So non-hard style martial arts I suppose. Whilst I am an avid and experienced runner (for other reasons), I fail to see the application or need to do any running whatsoever for these arts. In fact I can't think of one of my sensei, or accomplished practitioners I have trained with ever ran, or in fact did any supplementary training. Actually come to think of it, when I am training hard (running, KB, BW, cycling, climbing) my Tai-Chi seems to suffer. Go figure...
That's just been my experience...
 

User 7569

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I have practiced Tai-Chi for a number of years,(probably far less than you) but have many, many more practicing Iaido, and Kenjutsu. So non-hard style martial arts I suppose. Whilst I am an avid and experienced runner (for other reasons), I fail to see the application or need to do any running whatsoever for these arts. In fact I can't think of one of my sensei, or accomplished practitioners I have trained with ever ran, or in fact did any supplementary training. Actually come to think of it, when I am training hard (running, KB, BW, cycling, climbing) my Tai-Chi seems to suffer. Go figure...
That's just been my experience...


I understand what you mean by Tai Chi suffering from other forms of training. I certainly used to notice a skill reduction from Barbell lifts when doing Tai Chi. Since dropping the weights Combat Conditioning (which includes road work) has been a great help, since my upper body was very inflexible before hand.

I'm mostly interested in Road Work because I get absolutely no running in any form from my current program, and like the way the light jogging feels between calisthenic exercises. Sometimes the rope just doesn't cut it on some days.

Road work affects my lung power pretty heavily too, especially when i do it as little as once a week. Since I'm trying to build stamina for Push Hands grappling I like just about anything that gets my lungs heavily worked.

I'm gonna try doing combat conditioning after my Tai Chi practice, instead of before, next time I go to class and see if I notice a difference from not working out my body before the practice.. thank you for your feedback
 

User 7569

Guest
Uphill sprints in the 50 to 100 yard range are great. Run up the hill.....walk down the hill. About 8-12 reps with an all out effort will leave you spent so do them after all your other road work. Also start with shallower hills, fewer reps, and 60% effort if you're not used to this sort of training or have any foot related problems such as plantar fasciitis.

Thank you for the suggestion! I'll try doing my road work to a hill next time and finish off with some hill sprints (also part of combat conditioning). I didn' think of including hill sprints into road work for some reason..
 

offwidth

Level 9 Valued Member
Maybe KB swings and/or TGU's would be effective supplementary training; especially for push-hands.
 

pet'

Level 8 Valued Member
Hello,

@Jak Nieuwenhuis
I'd go for something like
- sprints (let's say 15s) + 5/10 jumping squats
- 2 minutes easy running
- 10 / 15 Hindu push ups
- 2 minutes running
- crawling (or any animal walk such as lizzard walk, etc...) for 30s
-2 minutes running
and then repeat

This can give you a good conditioning and also working explosiveness and flexibility. You can replace running by jumping rope.

Kind regards,

Pet'
 

Carl

Level 5 Valued Member
Hill sprints, sprints and sled work (if you have access to one) all great tools. Maybe some easy endurance runs occasionally (1-3 miles easy pace).

Hike and walk to your heart's content.
 

Marc

Level 6 Valued Member
Little bit different answer:
I have done some decent amount of road work in the past (hill sprints, running intervals ...)
Honestly what I found out that doing 100 1h swings almost daily (4-6x/week) deliveres the same results conditioning wise all while being much more enjoyable. Also you do not have to hope for good weather. Another aspect of swings is that it does not suck the life out of you, something I experimented whit long and/or intense road work sessions. And the biggest point is that swings allow you to asses your progress very good. If you can swing a bigger bell right now than 3 months ago you have improved.
If you do not like swings or cannot do them for whatever reason crawling deliveres also great results. Once you can crawl for 10mins straight you are in great shape!
 

pet'

Level 8 Valued Member
Hello,

+1 for crawling, as @Marc just said !

This week-end I tried a combination of heavy swings (100 @ 40) and then 5 minutes of weigthed (@10) crawling. It works just fantastic !

It is brutal, but fast and efficient

Kind regards,

Pet'
 
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