Rogue Barbells

Anna C

More than 5000 posts
Elite Certified Instructor
Since @Michael Scott so helpfully brought it to my attention in this thread that Rogue is having their "5 items ship for $5" special right now, I'm thinking it might be time to buy a barbell and a few plates for my home gym.

I haven't shopped for barbells before. I want a good, decent, solid, starting barbell that is the best value for the cost. Not putting a limit on the cost -- I just know I don't want that $800 Eileiko one, haha.

As for the plates, not really sure which way to go on those, either. Of course whatever I start with, I'd like to continue building with the same style of plates.

Any helpful suggestions?

https://www.roguefitness.com/crossfit-equipment/top-products/bars
 

MattM

SFG1
Certified Instructor
Shopping for a barbell will drive you crazy. I recently got my first decent barbell. I went with the Rogue Echo (cheapest one they make). It was in the "boneyard" (closeout) and was only $160. I love it, I just wish it had center knurling.

Most people recommend the Ohio bar or Rogue bar 2.0 for all around great barbells. My next one will be the Ohio Power Bar.

This article should help: The Best Olympic Barbell - Garage Gym Reviews

Also keep in mind of other brands like Fringe sport, American barbell, strength shop, etc

@Anna C
 

dcc449

Triple-Digit Post Count
Very happy with my Rogue Ohio Bar. Don’t think I’ve ever heard a negative word from anyone about them, so if it’s in your price range, probably hard to go wrong with it.

I also have their HG bumper plates, which have been great - though they don’t have a ton of bounce in them, so would only recommend if you like firmer/stiffer bumper plates.
 

Carl in Dover

More than 300 posts
I have an Ohio bar that leave in the rack for squats and bench. No center knurl as I don't lift too heavy and don't seen to have a problem. I use another older Rogue bar for Deadlift and it stays on the floor.
While shopping, compare diameters, whip, and tensile strength as they differ from bar to bar.

I have the Hi-Temps bumpers and they have served well. No problems , but I don't drop 'em........

It's a shame that you don't live closer..... I'm gonna sell my 350# set Rogue Hi-Temps bumpers in about a week. ( my new Christmas presents arrive Wed!)

PS....dont forget collars! The Rogue HGs rock!
 

Timothy Friel

Quadruple-Digit Post Count
I have an Ohio bar that leave in the rack for squats and bench. No center knurl as I don't lift too heavy and don't seen to have a problem. I use another older Rogue bar for Deadlift and it stays on the floor.
While shopping, compare diameters, whip, and tensile strength as they differ from bar to bar.

I have the Hi-Temps bumpers and they have served well. No problems , but I don't drop 'em........

It's a shame that you don't live closer..... I'm gonna sell my 350# set Rogue Hi-Temps bumpers in about a week. ( my new Christmas presents arrive Wed!)

PS....dont forget collars! The Rogue HGs rock!
Are you selling the bar as well
 

ShawnM

More than 2500 posts
@Anna C- check out some of the packages that Rogue has that include the bar and plates. All of their bars are pretty good. The issue with a lot of bars starts when you load a ton on them or do what I see a lot of fools do on base, drop all the way from the top of the snatch with bumpers. Just plain stupid.
 

Phil12

Quadruple-Digit Post Count
I have a Rogue Bar 2.0 and no complaints. Probably should've gotten the Ohio Bar for what I was going to use it for. The knurling felt sharp as all get-out for a few days but I adapted to it pretty quickly.
 

william bad butt

More than 300 posts
Rogue has a lot of great options. I recommend you consider the B&R Bar (Burgener & Rippetoe). It costs <$300. This is what I use for all of my barbell lifts, powerlifts and also accessories. I bought this bar because I wanted 1 bar that I could do everything with. It has both power lifting and weightlifting dual knurl mark rings. It also has a modest center knurling for squatting. The bar can handle a lot of weight with minimal bending or deflection, so it's great for training but not so good if your goal is a whippy bar. The actual knurling is moderate. Pronounced enough that you can grip the bar fine during deadlifts or power cleans, but not so aggressive that you will tear your hands up.
 

william bad butt

More than 300 posts
One thing to keep in mind is center knurling. A lot of the Rogue barbells mentioned above don't have it. This is fine if you don't plan on training back squats.

But if you do go with center knurling, make sure the center knurling isn't too wide or you may scrape your shins when doing deadlifts.
 

Geoff Chafe

Quadruple-Digit Post Count
A bar and plate set is your cheapest option.

Kijiji or equivalent used? Like new half price

Do you want a Women’s 25mm bar or a standard 28mm bar?

Medium or an aggressive knurl?

Do you want a bar to last, or a bar to start and buy more expensive later? I am of the buy quality once school of though. Cheaper in the long run.

Do you want center knurling for Squats and overhead Presses?

200,000psi tensile Strength Steel at a minimum, stainless steel is better but more expensive.

10 needle bearings is better, 5 is pretty standard. I would not bother with a bushing bar.

Definitely start with bumper plates. Just buy the cheapest rubber training bumper you can find. Plates don’t really matter.
 

Geoduck

Double-Digit Post Count
This is super tempting, thanks for posting the deal. I’ve been wanting to start putting together a barbell + rack setup since I’ve been lifting more in the last few months. Doing StrongLifts. My cheap 10+ year old Walmart 3 piece Standard barbell is... well, terrifying lately even though my weights are super low, haha. Not to hijack your thread but one of my goals is to squat heavy. Center knurling is pretty much a must, correct?
 

Anna C

More than 5000 posts
Elite Certified Instructor
Wow, fantastic input, just what I was hoping for.

Quality, standard 28 mm, medium knurl, center knurl, corrosion-resistant. I live in high humidity and it may end up living in an out-building; not directly outside, but not inside the air-conditioned house. It will be mostly for my own training, but may train others with it someday. And no rack yet, but that would be a future goal. Plates in 5 lb increments up to 300 lb.

Here's my shopping cart but I'll give it another day before I pull the trigger... Love that shipping cost!!

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Steve W.

Quadruple-Digit Post Count
The main reason I consider center knurling essential is for one-handed barbell lifts.

For bumpers, the solid rubber ones are fine (I have Rogue HGs). There's a limit to how much weight you can squeeze on the bar, but it's not a factor for most people. @Steve Freides, I like bumpers because they're a little easier on the floor and quieter, even for deadlifts. Also, cast iron 45s tend to fit looser on the bar sleeves than bumpers, so they tend to rattle a lot more and come loose easier. With bumpers, you end up doing a lot less readjusting and collar tightening.

You only really need 45s, and a pair of 25s, plus metal 10s, 5s, and 2.5s. IMO, 35lb bumpers and bumpers less than 25lbs are pointless. Lighter ones are really too thin to use by themselves (and why would you need bumpers for less than 105lbs anyway), and you can easily make any intermediate weights up to the next 45 with metal plates, so 35s are not needed either.

My favorite collars that I've tried are the Proloc collars. They are very secure and one of the few collars that fit regular olympic bars AND specialty bars like farmers walk handles and safety squat bars that have sleeves made from pipe that is slightly smaller in diameter.

Rogue never really has significant price discounts, but the holiday shipping deal is great for heavy stuff.
 

Steve Freides

Forum Administrator
Senior Certified Instructor
I like bumpers because they're a little easier on the floor and quieter, even for deadlifts. Also, cast iron 45s tend to fit looser on the bar sleeves than bumpers, so they tend to rattle a lot more and come loose easier. With bumpers, you end up doing a lot less readjusting and collar tightening.
Funny, I agree with your observations but have opposing opinions about them. My bumpers, on my deadlift mats, together have too much bounce for me. And I like that iron plates slide on and off the bar easily and don't enjoy loading and unload my bumpers for that reason.

You only really need 45s, and a pair of 25s, plus metal 10s, 5s, and 2.5s. IMO, 35lb bumpers and bumpers less than 25lbs are pointless. Lighter ones are really too thin to use by themselves (and why would you need bumpers for less than 105lbs anyway)
Again, I will disagree. I have used a bar plus the 10 lb. bumpers when I wanted 65 lbs. total but didn't want a student to have to reach further than the standard distance to the bar. I haven't done this often, but I have done it more than once. I have a pair each of 45, 25, and 10. I'll agree on not needing 35's.

FWIW, my "bumpers" really aren't bumpers, they're rubber plates - all rubber, just a metal ring in the center. If you look up "rubber weight plates," you'll find similar.

-S-
 
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