Running For Health- Pros and Cons?

ShawnM

Level 8 Valued Member
400s, death on two legs. (nod to the great Freddie Mercury and Queen)

For health - with no must run a personal best or must run 5 miles more than yesterday, your world is governed by - as it should be for all runners but - being pain free and easy. No need to beat yourself up. Just go out and run.
Can't beat a run on a beach or the woods, out in nature anyway, leaving the pounding and traffic fumes well behind.
Keep it all very easy. I dunno but as a general thing as I've also heard a lot of ex jogging pounders of the pavement say - 45 mins to 1 hour is good. About right is good enough isn't it? Build into that. Nice and easy.
Accrue some volume and if you fancy add in a couple of faster runs here and there.
I do nice easy runs, 45 mins or so, with my dog sometimes but off road.
Bit of aerobic, relaxing, no hassle. Thing is, if you enjoy it, it's good for you.
As a pedantic sprinter/running mechanics nerd - focus on the technique of running, forget everything else. You'll be a better runner, less achey pains, develop a springy stride, be more efficient and enjoy it even more.
I like beach runs as well. With my OA I can still manage sand sprints due to the extra padding from the sand, just not so fast, but that's fine.
 

MV144

Level 1 Valued Member
The biggest issue with running is programming. 99.99% of the strength gurus out there are not runners, they hate running and likely they are rubbish at running. Matt Vincent posted a video on youtube, he just tested his mile run and finished in 7:30 which is pretty slow for a guy that athletic, Stefi Cohen rang him and she's like "wow 7:30?! That's awesome". I'm not knocking on Vincent or Cohen (I have 2 of his books, great training resource and she's incredibly knowledgeable and intelligent on training, her videos are also excellent resources) just making a point that even top strength minds are not runners.
So if you try to get info on running from traditional strength coaches, you'll get either the no running at all guys, the only hill sprints guys or the slow run for x minutes guys. In other words, do your due diligence before taking advice.

You need to approach endurance the way you approach strength and power. Running takes practice and intelligent programming. You need goals, you need to keep track of everything, you need to test and you need to drill the skills.

Just like other aspects of training, it needs to be sensible. If you have little to no running experience, repeat sprints or running long distances is not a wise idea despite what your favorite writer says. Start like a beginner, be humble and work your way up into more intense training methods. As always, training is a road map, know the starting point and know the destination.
 

Bauer

Level 6 Valued Member
The biggest issue with running is programming. 99.99% of the strength gurus out there are not runners, they hate running and likely they are rubbish at running.
That is a good point.
On the other hand, the OP asked about running for health, and a lot of dedicated running programs are about performance.

I guess Niko Niko running and Jeff Galloway's run-walk method might be good starting points for a health-focused plan.

Personally, I tend to forget how good a long walk feels, as it is so easy... But the overall effects for physical and mental (!) health are just great.

Just yesterday I walked for more than two hours with my wife and daughter, and we all feel great, like having washed away the stresses from the week. My knee feels better and my mood is up, too. Quality time with the family, too. And we picked up some fine Sushi on the way. Win-win-win-win, I guess :D
 

MV144

Level 1 Valued Member
That is a good point.
On the other hand, the OP asked about running for health, and a lot of dedicated running programs are about performance.

I guess Niko Niko running and Jeff Galloway's run-walk method might be good starting points for a health-focused plan.

Personally, I tend to forget how good a long walk feels, as it is so easy... But the overall effects for physical and mental (!) health are just great.

Just yesterday I walked for more than two hours with my wife and daughter, and we all feel great, like having washed away the stresses from the week. My knee feels better and my mood is up, too. Quality time with the family, too. And we picked up some fine Sushi on the way. Win-win-win-win, I guess :D

My first answer was do both. Walking can and should be done daily. It's great for your health and mental health. Adopt a dog from the shelter, walk your dog 3x a day and you'll cardiovascular fitness and body composition will improve drastically.
You're correct, my post relates more to running for fitness.
Running is one of these things that has benefits so people overdo it. I love to run, I run often and I'm decent at it but I have no intention of running a marathon or even a half marathon.
 

Don Fairbanks

SFG II
Certified Instructor
Interesting info. on this thread in Exercised by Daniel E. Lieberman, Part III, Endurance, chapter 9, Running and Dancing, Jumping from one leg to the other. Chapters 8 and 10 also good.
 

Coyote

Level 5 Valued Member
Born to Run, is a good title for a book, and it is a good book. I believe if the author of the article would have read the book, he would know that Born to Run is also a true statement. Running is part of what separated Homo Sapiens from several other of our close relatives that were around a few hundred thousand years ago. The author's article more closely describes Neanderthal man. How many Neanderthals have you seen recently? Homo Sapiens survived, while Neanderthal man, Homo Erectus and several others did not. Many scientist believe our propensity for bipedal movement is one reason why.

I am not sure how someone can justify that we are born to lift heavy crap, less then 5 reps for a certain amount of sets in a gym? I believe in Strong first theory. I just believe we need to be strong for a purpose, and strong in a gym serves no purpose that I desire. I strength train for my life, my life is not strength training.

I am someone who does run, and I suck at it, but I have completed a couple ultras. I do not consider myself a runner. I am someone who does believe a healthy human should be able to bipedal move themselves through the country for several hours.

My running includes a lot of walking.:cool:
 
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