S & S + Grappling?

Cr3do

Double-Digit Post Count
Hello there,

I currently train BJJ and submission grappling.

I would like to add some strength and conditioning training, and Pavel's Simple & Sinister program seems the perfect fit for me.

I train grappling 5 x per week, but I'm wondering how often I should train S&S on top on this.

I was thinking S&S 2 x per week, but will I see good progress with this?
Or should I aim for 3 x per week?

Any help and advice is really appreciated.

Kind regards.
 

Pavel Macek

More than 2500 posts
Master Certified Instructor
@Cr3do I personally suggest 3 times a week. 2 times a week is the minimum. Our pro-fighters usually train S&S in the morning, and MMA about hour after S&S, or in the evening, 3-5 times a week.

S&S, if you follow it as prescribed (ie. you don't rush with the weights, keep your swings explosive - and don't rush between the sets - and have your get-ups under 100% control), it is actually a recharge, not a drain. Experiment.
 

Cr3do

Double-Digit Post Count
@Pavel Macek thank you for your reply.

I plan to stick to the program as prescribed. I have only read and heard good things about the program and it will fit perfectly with my lifestyle at the moment.

The reason I asked 2 or 3 x per week, is I know for sure I can defiantly fit in 2 S&S sessions in per week.

If I was going to see a lot more improvement with 3 sessions then I can make room for it in my schedule. But ideally I would prefer 2 sessions, along with my 5 seasons of Grappling.

How important is it for me to fit in the 3rd session in per week?

Kind regards.
 

Pavel Macek

More than 2500 posts
Master Certified Instructor
@Cr3do I would suggest to start 3 times a week, and you will see. You may find out that you actually like it.
 

Cr3do

Double-Digit Post Count
@Pavel Macek
Ok you have convinced me. I'll start with 3 times per week.

Do you tend to keep you MMA fighters on S&S until they reach the Sinister weight Kettlebell?
 

Pavel Macek

More than 2500 posts
Master Certified Instructor
@Cr3do I am not worried much about the weight - we focus on quality first (eg. maximum explosiveness in the swings). It is still "Easy Strength" type of training for them. When I asked them if they want to switch to another program, most of them say: "It works, so why?"
 

Cr3do

Double-Digit Post Count
@Pavel Macek
Awesome just what I wanted to hear!
I hope this is a start to a long and sussesfull relationship for me and S&S!
I am so motivated to start and have fun with this.
Thank you so much for you help and input.
 

FilthyTL

My Third Post
@Pavel Macek did you happen to work with Pesta for this past fight?

I read your previous article outlining your program with him for his last fight and was impressed.
I use the S&S principles very often in my own workouts and was wondering if you have other tips on how to incorporate other methods in to an overall plan for approaching a fight?
 

banzaiengr

Quadruple-Digit Post Count
I'm sure Mr. Macek has much more experience than I do. His instruction on using an Easy Strength style is very well put. To ensure there would be no overtraining issues I would take a look at Pavel's latest article S&S Progression Tactic and just listen to your body as you progress.
 

Pavel Macek

More than 2500 posts
Master Certified Instructor
@FilthyTL Last few months Viktor was following his strength and conditioning prep on his own, according the program I wrote for him, as he was training for his fight in Sweden, USA, and Sweden again. Because he was already working with 40+ kg bells, and they did not have bells heavy enough for him in the gyms abroad, he was doing "Easy Strength" barbell program - deadlift, bench press, full contact twist.

Do you have any specific questions? Shoot.
 

FilthyTL

My Third Post
@Pavel Macek sounds good! Was just wondering. I don't have many specific questions, just always curious to see what other guys following similar methods are doing when it comes to fight prep.

Do you recommend basically alternating between the 2 methods (S&S/ES)? Obviously the available implements will play a large role in what is prescribed but those 2 seem to be great choices for supplementing grappling/mma training.
 

Pavel Macek

More than 2500 posts
Master Certified Instructor
@HUNTER1313 Easy Strength programming is explained in detail in the book (sets, reps, how often, etc.) - a must reading. In nutshell: Cca. 80% intensity, 2-3 exercises, 1-5 reps (with emphasis on 2-3), 10 reps total per exercise, lots of rest (5-15 minutes). "Lift heavy, not hard".

As for the exercise selection, for fighters I choose deadlift, benchpress and full contact twist.

@FilthyTL I recommend the program outlined in my article here, own at least the "Simple" standards, and include the push press, as explained in the article. You can stay on the program for a long time. You can follow up with to ES later, or do S&S/ES in 2 weeks blocks (which is exactly what we are going to test).

The main message is - if you are a fighter, lift, but don't turn it in your main event. It is a fundamental practice, but not a competition event.
 

caddo2000

Double-Digit Post Count
@Pavel Macek, if you don't mind, how many days per week do your athletes follow the ES protocol? nearly daily, like for the S&S one or 2-3 days a week like the ES book suggests?
 

Pavel Macek

More than 2500 posts
Master Certified Instructor
@caddo2000 When they have no fight scheduled, usually 3-4 times a week. Few weeks prior to the fight we gradually cut the ES training sessions to 3 and later to 2, as their MMA prep gets more and more intensive.
 

Pavel Macek

More than 2500 posts
Master Certified Instructor
@keith_g so far I switched only 2 fighters to ES - Viktor (because in the gyms in Sweden and USA they didn't have any heavier bells that he needed), and one of his colleagues (because of injury - he could not do get-ups and deadlifts, but could safely perform the barbell lifts).

Conditioning - Steve Baccari's running protocols from Easy Strength book, or extra MMA training. Best cardio for MMA is - MMA. You can roll and have a very easy sparring in a long distance run tempo, or you can hit pads/bag in a S&S swing manner (short bursts, longer recovery). Good thing about pros is that they are always in shape.
 
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