S&S, Naked Warrior, Walking and Judo

pet'

Level 8 Valued Member
Reps and sets are wide:
Massive reps with easy variations (kind of Matt Furey)
EMOM or even circuits with harder variations

Most of the time, I end up with a circuit like: 1 OAOL Right, 1 OAOL Left, 1 pistol right and 1 pistol left, 1 hard pull up variation, during 20 minutes and I am done

In all cases I want to get some conditioning during the training, because I am after GPP. Some kind of bdw version of S&S.

Kind regards,

Pet'
 
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Kozushi

Level 7 Valued Member
Hello,

@Kozushi
My bread and butter bodyweight moves, in addition to push ups and squats (toward OAOL and pistol), are pull ups.

They are wonderful to build the upper body (shoulders, traps, lats, and arms of course). As push ups, they offer plenty of variations, to make them more challenging (weight, archer, typewriter, etc...)

The "rest" may be accessory (but not necessarily useless). For instance, the core (hanging leg raises, LSit, Dragon flags...)

As you see, this is a very basic push - pull - leg ;)

I also do a lot of flexibility and mobility but I guess this is another topic. Regarding this the back bridge is fantastic because it is some kind of pull. You can do it more challenging if you do it one legged for example. The splits (lateral and frontal) and the twists are nice as well

Kind regards,

Pet'
Those are the three moves tested starting this Fall at the SFB certifications: OAOL pushup, pistol and 5 pullups. Those are the "heavy" moves. I've been doing leg raises and L-sits but on the parallell bars and not on the chinup bar. I am quite good at dips I think (can do sets of 9) but as you rightly pointed out their transferability to other movements is quite limited. However, as a judoka I guarantee that the dip develops excellent strength for judo, and it seems to build very large triceps muscles and pectorals. Dips can be hard on the shoulders, but they're easier I think than pullups on the shoulders because the range of motion is less. Dips seems like a high "bang for buck" move. But indeed, with limited transferability to other things, which is a bit of a problem.

There were three "holes" I felt I was finding with bodyweight only training. These:

  • very hard to train the back chain of strength - yes I was doing straight back bridges and bodyweight rows with gymnastics rings but, these are very light moves compared with kettlebell swings or deadlifts. I think bodyweight training comes up short in terms of developing the back chain. Pavel writes this in Naked Warrior.
  • pressing straight up is very hard to do with bodyweight - yes, you can do handstand pushups against a wall, but this is annoying even if cool! Pike pushups are an interesting compromise though, but still, it's just better with a kettlebell or barbell! WAY better! (Not that pressing straight up is a critical skill or anything, but I noticed it was a hole.)
  • rotational/anti-twist strength is also very hard to train it seems with bodyweight. Yes again you can do it like with the one arm pushup or one leg squat, but I noticed this stuff is quite hard and heavy to do and yet again it is just way better with a dumbbell or kettlebell: I can do 100 1 arm swings but how many one arm pushups can I do...? Not so many before getting quite sore and stiff.

I'll say though that the callisthenics stuff was very good for judo strength, maybe 3/4 as good as S&S if I had to guesstimate it. What I noticed the most in terms of deficiency was when I was yanking someone in judo with one arm I didn't have the strength or control that I had when I was keeping my S&S up to snuff.

I'd say that if someone were to do their S&S swings 3 or more times a week and the rest were bodyweight-only training, this would work out fine. For instance:
  • 1h kettlebell swings
  • (optional) kettlebell military or bent or side press (to get the upwards pressing in)
Bodyweight-only:
  • dips
  • pullups
  • chinups (I think this variant is important too)
  • one arm pushups (or archer if you can't do them)
  • pistols/ archer squats or shrimp squats (if you can't do pistols)
  • L and/or V-sits
But... I can see how with just swings and TGUs that you're getting every kind of movement in. Very compact!
 

Kozushi

Level 7 Valued Member
I've got to be very sparing in the bodyweight moves I'm going to train. S&S done seriously is serious business, and I've got to master the snatch for the SFG 1 exam that I intend to pass when ready.

Here is my plan for move focus:

S&S:
  • 1 hand swings
  • Turkish Getups

SFG 1:
  • the snatch (starting with lots of high pulls with a heavier bell)
  • the kettlebell press (why not? Easy to do, only takes a few seconds!)

Naked Warrior:
  • 1 arm pushups (1 arm 1 leg pushups for testing/showing off)
  • pistol squat (got to get started on this properly, I've been a bit neglectful of it!)

SFB:
  • pullups
Also, chinups, L-sits and dips are just simply good and easy things to do. If I find I can handle some of them, I will. Honestly, I'm not sure that dips don't help with one arm pushups. Dips isolate the triceps as does the one arm pushup. I think there is indeed transferability.
 
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Kozushi

Level 7 Valued Member
Reps and sets are wide:
Massive reps with easy variations (kind of Matt Furey)
EMOM or even circuits with harder variations

Most of the time, I end up with a circuit like: 1 OAOL Right, 1 OAOL Left, 1 pistol right and 1 pistol left, 1 hard pull up variation, during 20 minutes and I am done

In all cases I want to get some conditioning during the training, because I am after GPP. Some kind of bdw version of S&S.

Kind regards,

Pet'
That is good to know. That looks like a very solid way to train the moves a lot without exhausting yourself.

I can't do pistols yet - haven't really tried much for a few years. I need to start on them.

For the OAOL pushups, I focus on the One Arm pushups and do sets of 3 reps. To me the only big difference between one arm and OAOL is the balance problem. The NW book says you should to a slightly easier variation of the exercise as your main focus with higher reps but the full out version less often for less reps, if I am remembering the book properly.

Pet, do you think that dips help the one arm pushup? I have a feeling they do. I have been doing lots of dips the past 3 months or so and the one arm pushups are really no problem at all now. I suspect there is transferability, maybe because the one arm pushup is also a very triceps-dependent exercise. Regular pushups seem to get the pecs involved a lot more but the one arm pushup is more of a triceps thing. Hmmm... I have a suspicion that dips are helpful for the one arm pushup but not sure... What do you think?

I like your routine and the focus on those three moves. Without S&S I have to worry about exercising the core and back chain with bodyweight, but with S&S I can just focus on those three moves perhaps and I'd be fine. Interesting...
 

pet'

Level 8 Valued Member
Hello,

@Kozushi
very hard to train the back chain of strength - yes I was doing straight back bridges and bodyweight rows with gymnastics rings but, these are very light moves compared with kettlebell swings or deadlifts. I think bodyweight training comes up short in terms of developing the back chain. Pavel writes this in Naked Warrior
This is true. When you are on the go, or if you have resistance band or heavy (but not that much) weight, you can do single leg deadlift. Of course, you will lift a little bit less weight, but you will engage a lot the anti-twist and also work on stability. Eventually, this transfer quite well to regular deadlift because this is way harder than it looks ! Considering your judo practice, it may be interesting in your toolbox.

pressing straight up is very hard to do with bodyweight - yes, you can do handstand pushups against a wall
Once again, you are right and I agree with you. The only drawback I consider in the HSPU (even done in a full ROM using 2 chairs for instance) is that you will have less core engagement. Indeed, you will engage just enough to maintain a straight line, but not as much as if you had to stabilize the trunk when you lift overhead.

I'd say that if someone were to do their S&S swings 3 or more times a week and the rest were bodyweight-only training
In an old SF blog article, this exactly what Pavel says. 3 times a week is enough for the "average guy" who want to get some all-terrain conditioning. This does not interfere with recovery or any other physical activity. 10 * 10 OA swings, done A+A style, 3 times a week guarantee enough volume, even for a sportsman.

That is good to know. That looks like a very solid way to train the moves a lot without exhausting yourself.
Yes. To be honest, I never get tired or sore after an EMOM. Basically, I recover as easily from that than an A+A session. This is important for me, because I walk about 2h a day, and always carry our supply (food, water, etc...) because we chose not having a car. Plus, I do 3 boxing sessions a week so for me, recovery is crucial. EMOM and AA also give me a lot volume in a minimal amount of time.

Pet, do you think that dips help the one arm pushup?
Yes they help, but only to a certain extent, in my humble opinion. Dips are very triceps oriented. So as you mentioned, it helps in any pressing motion. However, it will not develop core strength or anti-rotation. You can do more dips that OA or OAOL push ups because you are not bothered with stability and full contraction. In this regard, this is why OAOL PU are so interesting. In daily life, you are always obliged to deal with stability. A pure pressing motion remains rare.

Then if I had to use different moves to build my OAOL PU, I'd do plenty of dips, but also plenty of anti rotation exercise, such as Palof press, or even OA swings.

But I think the simplest way to go is to build volume with OA only (a few sets a day, GTG style). Indeed, nothing build specificity. Plus, if you do not control very well the lowering phase of the dips, especially if you get down below the parallel, it can be harsh on the joints. The push up is less likely to get you injured.

S&S is a very "compact" program, which covers a lot of things: conditioning with easy recovery, full body, core strength, stability, pressing (floor press when you get into the straight arm position for the GU). But there is no upper pull (no matter strength-oriented or endurance oriented), and no pushing for endurance.

Kind regards,

Pet'
 

Kozushi

Level 7 Valued Member
Hello,

@Kozushi

This is true. When you are on the go, or if you have resistance band or heavy (but not that much) weight, you can do single leg deadlift. Of course, you will lift a little bit less weight, but you will engage a lot the anti-twist and also work on stability. Eventually, this transfer quite well to regular deadlift because this is way harder than it looks ! Considering your judo practice, it may be interesting in your toolbox.


Once again, you are right and I agree with you. The only drawback I consider in the HSPU (even done in a full ROM using 2 chairs for instance) is that you will have less core engagement. Indeed, you will engage just enough to maintain a straight line, but not as much as if you had to stabilize the trunk when you lift overhead.


In an old SF blog article, this exactly what Pavel says. 3 times a week is enough for the "average guy" who want to get some all-terrain conditioning. This does not interfere with recovery or any other physical activity. 10 * 10 OA swings, done A+A style, 3 times a week guarantee enough volume, even for a sportsman.


Yes. To be honest, I never get tired or sore after an EMOM. Basically, I recover as easily from that than an A+A session. This is important for me, because I walk about 2h a day, and always carry our supply (food, water, etc...) because we chose not having a car. Plus, I do 3 boxing sessions a week so for me, recovery is crucial. EMOM and AA also give me a lot volume in a minimal amount of time.


Yes they help, but only to a certain extent, in my humble opinion. Dips are very triceps oriented. So as you mentioned, it helps in any pressing motion. However, it will not develop core strength or anti-rotation. You can do more dips that OA or OAOL push ups because you are not bothered with stability and full contraction. In this regard, this is why OAOL PU are so interesting. In daily life, you are always obliged to deal with stability. A pure pressing motion remains rare.

Then if I had to use different moves to build my OAOL PU, I'd do plenty of dips, but also plenty of anti rotation exercise, such as Palof press, or even OA swings.

But I think the simplest way to go is to build volume with OA only (a few sets a day, GTG style). Indeed, nothing build specificity. Plus, if you do not control very well the lowering phase of the dips, especially if you get down below the parallel, it can be harsh on the joints. The push up is less likely to get you injured.

S&S is a very "compact" program, which covers a lot of things: conditioning with easy recovery, full body, core strength, stability, pressing (floor press when you get into the straight arm position for the GU). But there is no upper pull (no matter strength-oriented or endurance oriented), and no pushing for endurance.

Kind regards,

Pet'
I was maybe 26 before I got my driver's licence, for the same reason. I felt that actually living for real, carrying groceries was better. I still think so, but with a full time job there isn't so much time for that stuff anymore. I use baskets instead of carts at the grocery store though, hahaha.

I need to look into the single led deadlift. We do something like this called "airplanes" at judo every time. It seems like a good way to train when only small weights are available.

I think it must have been the dips that hurt my left shoulder. I was doing so many of them. Dips have application in judo although maybe not for a lot of other things.

I'll keep at the S&S and NW + pullups/chinups then. I guess this way I'm getting everything within reason accomplished without overdoing it.
 

pet'

Level 8 Valued Member
Hello,

I was maybe 26 before I got my driver's licence, for the same reason. I felt that actually living for real, carrying groceries was better. I still think so, but with a full time job there isn't so much time for that stuff anymore
You know, I am 29 years old now ahah. My girlfriend and I both have our driving license, but we live quite close to Paris. I work in this town though. I buy our stuff during my lunch time. That way, I can save a lot of time. Plus, this forces me to walk fast so this is a good exercise as well. I can also practice some nasal breathing in the meanwhile so this is perfect for me.

I need to look into the single led deadlift. We do something like this called "airplanes" at judo every time. It seems like a good way to train when only small weights are available.
OAOL plank or the even harder - OAOL Lalanne plank - is also excellent for anti-rotation and core stability. Plus this also works a lot on the shoulder stability.

I'll keep at the S&S and NW + pullups/chinups then
I think that something like S&S three times a week, plus your bodyweight only session 2 to 3 times a week, plus some GTG can get you far without burning out (considering your judo training and other energy expenditures).

Kind regards,

Pet'
 

Kozushi

Level 7 Valued Member
Hello,


You know, I am 29 years old now ahah. My girlfriend and I both have our driving license, but we live quite close to Paris. I work in this town though. I buy our stuff during my lunch time. That way, I can save a lot of time. Plus, this forces me to walk fast so this is a good exercise as well. I can also practice some nasal breathing in the meanwhile so this is perfect for me.


OAOL plank or the even harder - OAOL Lalanne plank - is also excellent for anti-rotation and core stability. Plus this also works a lot on the shoulder stability.


I think that something like S&S three times a week, plus your bodyweight only session 2 to 3 times a week, plus some GTG can get you far without burning out (considering your judo training and other energy expenditures).

Kind regards,

Pet'
Yes, that way I'm developing a number of things I want to but without overdoing it. I'm still going to try to do S&S every day (within reason).

I visited Paris in 2015 in the summertime.

Your English is very good. You must have studied it the way you train physically. Well done!
 
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pet'

Level 8 Valued Member
Hello,

I'm still going to try to do S&S every day (within reason)
This is very serious business. I admire you for such dedication and great results.

I am way weaker than you. I can not endure such effort, along with my other energy expenditures. I do not know how you do but I'd like this ability ! Basically, the swing portion is doable, as I am a more naturally endurance oriented guy. However, I noticed that 3 days a week strength training is enough for me, for both maintenance and gains. If I consider S&S, or even "Bent and Sinister" - which makes me do bent press instead of GU - I have to reduce the grind portion to only 3 lifts a day. I am very influenced by the "daily dose deadlift program" which is an article on the blog. It works so well on me, for all the lifts (press, DL, GU, etc...).

I just pace up when I feel it. Indeed, I noticed there are moment in year or life when I want to progress, and some other when I just want to maintain and secure. In all cases, I am very careful with overtraining. I already got injured that way, working on the front lever...

I visited Paris in 2015 in the summertime
To be more accurate, I live very close to the Versailles castle. Then I have full access to a huge forest, which is always super convenient to go for a walk or running. I really enjoy being in the nature.

Your English is very good. You must have studied it the way you train physically. Well done!
Thank you ! Yes I extensively studied English during my studies. I am a financial engineer so… Plus, I use it quite often for work. Considering "leisure", most of the contents I read are written in English, so it keeps me more or less "comfortable". Strongfirst helps me a lot as well, I have to admit ;)
Language, or even "mind training", is only a matter of consistent practice, so does the physical training. A little everyday

Kind regards,

Pet'
 

Kozushi

Level 7 Valued Member
Hello,


This is very serious business. I admire you for such dedication and great results.

I am way weaker than you. I can not endure such effort, along with my other energy expenditures. I do not know how you do but I'd like this ability ! Basically, the swing portion is doable, as I am a more naturally endurance oriented guy. However, I noticed that 3 days a week strength training is enough for me, for both maintenance and gains. If I consider S&S, or even "Bent and Sinister" - which makes me do bent press instead of GU - I have to reduce the grind portion to only 3 lifts a day. I am very influenced by the "daily dose deadlift program" which is an article on the blog. It works so well on me, for all the lifts (press, DL, GU, etc...).

I just pace up when I feel it. Indeed, I noticed there are moment in year or life when I want to progress, and some other when I just want to maintain and secure. In all cases, I am very careful with overtraining. I already got injured that way, working on the front lever...


To be more accurate, I live very close to the Versailles castle. Then I have full access to a huge forest, which is always super convenient to go for a walk or running. I really enjoy being in the nature.


Thank you ! Yes I extensively studied English during my studies. I am a financial engineer so… Plus, I use it quite often for work. Considering "leisure", most of the contents I read are written in English, so it keeps me more or less "comfortable". Strongfirst helps me a lot as well, I have to admit ;)
Language, or even "mind training", is only a matter of consistent practice, so does the physical training. A little everyday

Kind regards,

Pet'
Yes, we visited Versailles too back then! Super stuff! You know, King Louis XIV was also the king of Canada, my country. It was a surreal experience! We actually got lost in the castle gardens, they are so huge! We also visited Chambord and Chenonceaux. I grew up dreaming about the castle Chambord - there were lots of books about it in our school library in French (I went to a French Immersion school, and now I teach French Immersion as my career.) Chambord also has a wonderful and huge forest. There didn't seem to be many mosquitoes in France. You guys are lucky! Here we have a lot out in the (real) wild, although if you go for a hike in city forests I think they spray the mosquitoes so they are not so bad.

I too find that Strongfirst is a good way to keep my English writing skills up to snuff. In my job I don't use very much English. I forgot the word for "paperclip" several weeks ago talking with a secretary, hahaha! I read a lot of literature out loud in French to make sure my French stays strong at the kind of level I need to teach advanced French (Rabelais, Jules Verne...). I also study Korean. It isn't related to English or French so it is much harder. (My wife is from Korea, that's why I study it, but I also love the East Asian cultures and histories.)

My muscles are specialized in S&S by now after more than 3 years with it. When I hurt myself it is by trying new moves that aren't in S&S. My body is also perfectly adapted to judo after 31 years of it! Hahaha!

I am pumping out sets of 3 to 6 one arm pushups now. This is good. When I really master this move I need to start developing the pistol.

I have to say though that I think it's a bit ironic that after all this S&S for years I am much more likely to pass an SF bodyweight certification than a kettlebell one! :)

We had an early judo training session today because it's a holiday in Ontario where I live.
 

pet'

Level 8 Valued Member
Hello,

Yes, we visited Versailles too back then! Super stuff! You know, King Louis XIV was also the king of Canada, my country. It was a surreal experience! We actually got lost in the castle gardens, they are so huge! We also visited Chambord and Chenonceaux. I grew up dreaming about the castle Chambord - there were lots of books about it in our school library in French (I went to a French Immersion school, and now I teach French Immersion as my career.) Chambord also has a wonderful and huge forest. There didn't seem to be many mosquitoes in France. You guys are lucky! Here we have a lot out in the (real) wild, although if you go for a hike in city forests I think they spray the mosquitoes so they are not so bad.

I too find that Strongfirst is a good way to keep my English writing skills up to snuff. In my job I don't use very much English. I forgot the word for "paperclip" several weeks ago talking with a secretary, hahaha! I read a lot of literature out loud in French to make sure my French stays strong at the kind of level I need to teach advanced French (Rabelais, Jules Verne...). I also study Korean. It isn't related to English or French so it is much harder. (My wife is from Korea, that's why I study it, but I also love the East Asian cultures and histories.)
I think that being curious is what helps us keeping mentally sharp. It has some anti-aging effect IMO.

My muscles are specialized in S&S by now after more than 3 years with it. When I hurt myself it is by trying new moves that aren't in S&S. My body is also perfectly adapted to judo after 31 years of it! Hahaha!
Sure you get some specialization over the course of the years. Nonethless, Judo remain highly "complete", meaning it requires strength, power, endurance, etc... and is multi angle and multi plane sport. So to a certain extent, this is an extremely "whole body specialization" which transfers very well to daily life and movement: for instance, picking something up from the ground, etc...

This is something I always wondered: is it better doing complex moves such as S&S or NW, which cover more or less everything, even if we eventually get some specialization ? Doing so we progress faster and further. Or is it better doing more moves and varying a lot, even if we do it on purpose with a plan (so not randomly). Doing so, there is no specialization, but we may progress less, but we get this ability to learn just about what we want in "no time".

This is why I do not dedicate my side training to boxing. I keep it GPP oriented. Of course it helps my fight abilities, but it could be better.

Comparing to the others, I am not injured that often, probably thanks to this variety, but I also progress less than the "specialized" trainee.

I have to say though that I think it's a bit ironic that after all this S&S for years I am much more likely to pass an SF bodyweight certification than a kettlebell one! :)
Great ! This is really the beauty of S&S. It offers so many unexpected benefits, even with hard bodyweight variation. Sets of 3 to 6 are already impressive !

I guess this article may interest you, especially the transfer to SFB:
https://www.strongfirst.com/solid-simple-sinister/

I think I would struggle to do "Simple" - in terms of standard - tomorrow. The swing portion would be doable but the GU part… Well I'd need to properly reassess my drill and gain some of the required and specific strength ;)

Kind regards,

Pet'
 
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Kozushi

Level 7 Valued Member
Hello,


I think that being curious is what helps us keeping mentally sharp. It has some anti-aging effect IMO.


Sure you get some specialization over the course of the years. Nonethless, Judo remain highly "complete", meaning it requires strength, power, endurance, etc... and is multi angle and multi plane sport. So to a certain extent, this is an extremely "whole body specialization" which transfers very well to daily life and movement: for instance, picking something up from the ground, etc...

This is something I always wondered: is it better doing complex moves such as S&S or NW, which cover more or less everything, even if we eventually get some specialization ? Doing so we progress faster and further. Or is it better doing more moves and varying a lot, even if we do it on purpose with a plan (so not randomly). Doing so, there is no specialization, but we may progress less, but we get this ability to learn just about what we want in "no time".

This is why I do not dedicate my side training to boxing. I keep it GPP oriented. Of course it helps my fight abilities, but it could be better.

Comparing to the others, I am not injured that often, probably thanks to this variety, but I also progress less than the "specialized" trainee.


Great ! This is really the beauty of S&S. It offers so many unexpected benefits, even with hard bodyweight variation. Sets of 3 to 6 are already impressive !

I guess this article may interest you, especially the transfer to SFB:
https://www.strongfirst.com/solid-simple-sinister/

I think I would struggle to do "Simple" - in terms of standard - tomorrow. The swing portion would be doable but the GU part… Well I'd need to properly reassess my drill and gain some of the required and specific strength ;)

Kind regards,

Pet'
Well, judo and boxing are for life. Life is not for judo nor for boxing. These combat arts and sports were designed for enjoyment, exercise and for self-defence. The moment I forget this simple fact and start to take away from my life to feed my judo is the moment I am not longer doing judo the way it was designed. I do S&S for its own reasons but I certainly notice and appreciate that it also helps my judo strength. Frankly speaking, if my purpose for lifting weights was only to get better at judo, I likely would be doing a different kind of off-mat weight training. Like I said earlier, I think dips are super helpful for judo, as are hangs of various kinds, squats, lunges. S&S is certainly excellent for judo, but it is harder than doing those other, balanced and slower, technically easier moves. It's like studying Korean and French/English - these are different studies entirely, but there is some kind of WTH transferability of skills from studying Korean to the Western languages and vice-versa.

I agree that judo is enough to stay in good strength and health, provided it is done 3 times a week and you still get out for some healthy, natural walks (like shopping like you do etc.)

Being a jack of all trades but a master of none is appealing to some people. I prefer to master a few things. It is just more satisfying this way. I love more martial arts than just judo, but to master one is more pleasing than to be okay at a lot of them.
 

Kozushi

Level 7 Valued Member
S&S with the 32kg kettlebell today, then sets of 5 or 6 reps of presses with the 24kg and 32kg kettlebells. My left shoulder is still a bit sore, so trying to work it out before getting back to heavier heights. Did one arm pushups too. I'll be playing more later on - more NW stuff.
 

mikhael

Level 8 Valued Member
Naked Warrior Pistol variation might be helpful with your goal. Negative-Free Pistol for instance.
When I was chasing my first Pistol I noticed that the real problem was with mobility, not in strength.
 

pet'

Level 8 Valued Member
Hello,

@Kozushi
First of all, congratulations for so much dedication.

If you want to achieve the pistol, the progressions listed in TNW are excellent. From my understanding, you already are strong enough - meaning you already have the raw strength - to perform the pistol. My guess is that you also have the hip mobility due to your S&S and judo training.

Assuming you have the strength, a thing I really find extremely helpful is as follows:
- tie a rope to a door handle
- then, try to get to the low position of the pistol. The looser the rope remains, the less you are using it, the better it is. Once you reach some kind of "sticking point", keep getting down, using the rope by pull it. Basically, this is an assistance. Do it very slowly.
- Pull the rope to get up (once again, as an assistance). As soon as you feel you do not need it in the repetition, drop it

With practice, you will notice that the rope remains loose on a greater ROM, which is want you want to. I did not use a specific rep / set. I did it by GTG. However, I guess some regular strength rep / set frame may also get the job done.

Kind regards,

Pet'
 

Kozushi

Level 7 Valued Member
Haha! A sort of irony with a lot of these things is that it does indeed appear that I already do have the strength required for most any moves that can be done at home, and this is likely in the main from S&S although I'm sure judo hasn't gotten in the way of this either. When it comes to anything "legs" I'm not going to discount the contribution of walking either. S&S getups involve squatting using mostly just one one during the TGU. When I can do full pistols I'll post another video.

I'll try to rope trick if I'm having trouble. So far things are going well.
 

Kozushi

Level 7 Valued Member
According to the SF bodyweight program I was given today, I did a series of deadlifts and found I had no problem with 370lbs. That's weird as it never felt this easy before. I guess finishing a cycle of "Reload" and then having a few months break did it. I can put up to 420lbs on the bar with the plates I own. If I can end up doing a bunch of deadlifts at 420lbs every week then WOW! That's some decent strength of the most important type (back chain / big pull) to be carrying around with me! I'm excited!
 
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