S&S, Naked Warrior, Walking and Judo

Kozushi

Level 7 Valued Member
Hello,

@Kozushi
First of all, congratulations for so much dedication.

If you want to achieve the pistol, the progressions listed in TNW are excellent. From my understanding, you already are strong enough - meaning you already have the raw strength - to perform the pistol. My guess is that you also have the hip mobility due to your S&S and judo training.

Assuming you have the strength, a thing I really find extremely helpful is as follows:
- tie a rope to a door handle
- then, try to get to the low position of the pistol. The looser the rope remains, the less you are using it, the better it is. Once you reach some kind of "sticking point", keep getting down, using the rope by pull it. Basically, this is an assistance. Do it very slowly.
- Pull the rope to get up (once again, as an assistance). As soon as you feel you do not need it in the repetition, drop it

With practice, you will notice that the rope remains loose on a greater ROM, which is want you want to. I did not use a specific rep / set. I did it by GTG. However, I guess some regular strength rep / set frame may also get the job done.

Kind regards,

Pet'
I've pretty much got the pistol now. Like I said I did indeed have the strength. I started doing pistols on the edge of the staircase to ease in the mobility aspect, and now I'm good. It's not a hard move for someone doing so much hiking, walking and I suppose judo also helps since we're getting up off the ground all the time.
 

Kozushi

Level 7 Valued Member
I took last night off judo after an interesting but hectic day. My shoulder feels a bit better. I don't want to just stop training at all, but I know if I were to I'd heal up a lot faster!

I want the SFG and SFB certifications.
 

Kozushi

Level 7 Valued Member
Besides judo as always I've been doing a lot of hanging upside down from the bar and extending my legs out as far as possible in different directions, so basically levers, skin the cat etc. I still do dips, walking, I maintain the one arm pushups.

It seems like a good callisthenist on the bar/s is strong enough to do one arm pushups, and also that the lever hangs are heavier moves than regular pullups, which are all pushing me towards mastery of the levers on the bars.

By the way, my left shoulder injury is keeping me fro doing full range of motion pullups and S&S. I don't think I'm any the weaker for it all though. I can do things now that I couldn't before. It's an evolution I suppose.
 

Kozushi

Level 7 Valued Member
I restarted kendo about a month ago and I'm pleased to say that I am physically fit enough to handle all the drills. I naturally do get a bit worn out after 2 hours of training, but I'm happy I can last it out that long. Kendo is pretty serious, but fun, stuff.

My skill level in kendo is a different thing though. I'm basically a beginner.
 

Kozushi

Level 7 Valued Member
Not meaning to answer to my Canadian friend Kozushi, but no, none whatsoever. Mostly practice drills, then actual combat. Kozushi and I have actually played Kendo with the same people, but decades apart...
I restarted back in September. This time I'm not stopping ever. It is amazing!

You are more than welcome to answer for me anytime! Makes my life easier, haha!
 

Kozushi

Level 7 Valued Member
How is a session in kendo typically structured? A lot of isometric strength work?
I'm not at all sure what any kind of external training would be good for kendo at all. To my knowledge, there really isn't anything besides kendo itself. It is terrifically hard to learn and to maintain the skill as far as I know. I am fairly elementary a fencer myself so I may not be the best one to answer the question.
 

offwidth

Level 9 Valued Member
Indeed!

Being fit is a bonus, but skill and the mental aspect trump the physicality any day. I remember sparring with men like Tsuruda Sensei, and Oda Sensei, many, many years my senior, and smokers as well; never even close to beating those guys...
 

Kozushi

Level 7 Valued Member
Indeed!

Being fit is a bonus, but skill and the mental aspect trump the physicality any day. I remember sparring with men like Tsuruda Sensei, and Oda Sensei, many, many years my senior, and smokers as well; never even close to beating those guys...
Yes, if the body and sword are moved correctly it takes little effort but is lightning fast and on target. I'm nowhere near anything like this, haha!
I forget if you used to do judo too, and judo isn't completely different I've noticed. Sure, size and strength play more of a role, but I've been many times on the receiving end of little small but skilled guys' judo and know that my strength and weight don't give me much at all against them.
I'm not a beginner at judo even though I wouldn't say I'm good at it yet. I know when playing with the big strong guys up to brown belt level that it seems at times that they just don't know what they're doing tactically yet really, hahaha, just like my kendo! It's normally fairly easy to throw them when I want (not always though of course!)

As for strength training, the activities themselves seem to provide exactly the strength and endurance training I need for them. I've taken a break from weights in order to heal up my shoulders completely and they are indeed healing up. I seem to be doing better these days, maybe because I'm not spoiling my learned movement patterns with alien weight training movement patterns. I wonder if this is a correct assessment.

You might enjoy restarting kendo as I have.
 

Kozushi

Level 7 Valued Member
Hello @Kozushi !

Do you keep running S&S ?

Kind regards,

Pet'
I had to take a break from it to heal up my shoulders. My shoulders are healing up well. When I'm fine again I'll restart S&S. I credit S&S for any sort of base of strength I have for judo and kendo.
 

Kozushi

Level 7 Valued Member
Well there is that connection yes.... but it is valuable beyond that. I used the TacGU very successfully whilst working around my own shoulder issue.
I'm so active anyhow with judo and kendo that I'm not worried too much about losing strength. S&S clearly gave me the base for these two activities but I think I'll live without S&S for a bit until my shoulders get back to normal. But, yes, I can see the tactical getup being handy for avoiding some of the direct pressure on shoulder for some angles. Actually, I tend to roll up with power in the first part of the getup even on a good day.

If I'm finding my shoulders are not improving past a certain point, I'll just simply restart S&S and put up with the discomfort providing it isn't real pain.
 

mikhael

Level 8 Valued Member
Well there is that connection yes.... but it is valuable beyond that. I used the TacGU very successfully whilst working around my own shoulder issue.
I would like to try it for two reasons: 1st: my wrist injury, 2nd: I would like to implement few S&S sessions into my current training.
 
Top Bottom