S&S Progression Applied to Barbells

Bro Mo

> 1k Posts
Curious if anyone has tried a progression similar to S&S by sticking with a static load for a few weeks and replacing one set at a time with a heavier set every few weeks?
 

Alan Mackey

More than 300 posts
Curious if anyone has tried a progression similar to S&S by sticking with a static load for a few weeks and replacing one set at a time with a heavier set every few weeks?
That's what Easy Strength is like.

In my most common iteration of the program, I generally do 3 sets of three reps with three minute rest, three times a week. The load is enough to require an honest effort and stays the same until I deem it stupidly easy to lift. Then, I bump the load a bit and start all over again.
 

Timmer C

Triple-Digit Post Count
The S & S progression is nice way of having progression without having the ridiculous standard of trying to set a new PR each time you walk into a gym.

For myself, the conventional notion of constantly adding 5 pounds meant that the weight being lifted was soon exceeding my skill level which meant breakdown of form which meant injury which meant cussing which meant avoiding the gym.
 

Chrisdavisjr

> 1k Posts
I've heard of oly lifters using larger weight jumps in training to break plateaus. A lifter may comfortably be able to clean 98kg but gets stuck at 100kg for some reason. It might feel very similar to 98kg but that extra two kilos may throw them off. and they can't quite get it to happen. Stick 102kg on the bar and suddenly the weight feels noticeably different off the floor and gives them something more to 'fight against', helping them generate more power in their extension and make a lift they would have failed at a lighter weight.

Depending on how you respond to it and how your training's laid out, 'sneaking up' on a personal best 1kg at a time isn't always the best way to do it. Both baby steps and big jumps can wear you out for different reasons.
 

vegpedlr

More than 500 posts
That's how I train as well. I've discovered that there's nothing wrong with just practicing with the same loads for a few workouts to really lock it in. This sort of ES/S&S/DMPM thinking has made training a lot more sustainable for me.
 

Papa Georgio

More than 300 posts
Curious if anyone has tried a progression similar to S&S by sticking with a static load for a few weeks and replacing one set at a time with a heavier set every few weeks?
Large jumps in kettlebells lends itself to using step cycle progressions in S&S. Depending on total volume & intensity, I don't see why you can't use it for barbell. I would be inclined to think you would have to stay at submaximal intensities though. Grinding on 85% 1RM or more for a few times a week, for a few weeks, sounds brutal.
 

Bro Mo

> 1k Posts
The step cycle of PTTP is higher frequency and smaller jumps. I suppose a similar replacement strategy could be used by replacing one of the days each week with a heavier weight. Taking 5 weeks to replace all the days with the heavier weight.

For replacing sets with bigger jumps on a monthly cycle, ideally, 85% one week will become 80% in a couple weeks, then 75% after a couple more weeks. Introducing one heavier set slightly increasing the average but staying in the intensity range I'm looking for.

Currently debating if low-volume high-frequency like PTTP schedule fits my schedule better than higher-volume lower-frequency. Also debating if I want to do my conditioning after strength or on separate days and how that would effect either method.
 
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