Seriously, what exercises does StrongFirst advocate for Dumbbells???

Philippe Geoffrion

More than 500 posts
@John Grahill and @Pavel Macek You are correct. The Oldtime Strongmen referred to swinging a dumbell from the ground to overhead, with a locked out arm, the One Hand Swing, but Goerners record of 48 reps in succession with a 50kg dumbell stands.

It says in succession. Not sure if it is ballistic or from a dead stop:

"As to REPETITION one-arm snatches, Alexander Aberg, a Russian heavyweight wrestler and weightlifter who was a foster-brother of Lurich, snatched a barbell of 41 kg (90.38 lbs.) 53 times in succession and 49.5 kg. (109.12 lbs.) 30 times. For comparison with these lifts there is Hermann Goerner’s One Hand SWING of a dumbell weighing 50 kg. (110.23 lbs.), 48 times in succession. And the poundage possible in a Swing is slightly LESS than that in a Snatch."

"The greatest one-hand swing performer on record was, as was previously indicated, the German heavyweight, Hermann Goerner. While still an amateur lifter, Goerner, in 1920, at a bodyweight of 220 ½ pounds, swung a solid lead dumbbell equal in poundage to his own bodyweight (100 kilos). This, taking into account his weight/height (220.5 – 73.0, or 3.021) and the year (1920) he made his lift, gives him the exceedingly high rating of 87.9%. This lift of Goerner’s, incidentally, rests on the published statement of Tromp van Diggelen, as it is not listed in Edgar Mueller’s biography, “Goerner the Mighty”. The various other swing lifts by Goerner therein recounted, however, indicate conclusively that he was capable of a single dumbbell swing of a least 100 kilos, possibly more."

-David Willoughby-

I do not know if the dumbell was unevenly loaded, but I would assume so as was the style of the day, and allows for the most weight.
Is there a difference also in technique between the swing and snatch? As in the swing the dumbbell takes an arch like trajectory whereas the snatch is a more vertical path? If so, I think that makes the swing a bit more impressive. Lots of cool information here btw. I always love hearing about the old timers.
 

Pavel Macek

More than 2500 posts
Master Certified Instructor
Is there a difference also in technique between the swing and snatch? As in the swing the dumbbell takes an arch like trajectory whereas the snatch is a more vertical path? If so, I think that makes the swing a bit more impressive. Lots of cool information here btw. I always love hearing about the old timers.
Two different techniques. The snatch - see the video above. Dumbbell swing (or swing-snatch):

See some examples here:

 

Jeff Roark

Triple-Digit Post Count
Thanks Pavel. I've actually started messing around with the Dumbbell Snatch and hopefully work into some one arm barbell snatching in time. I have to say that I personally prefer the dumbbells over the KB for snatches, well, and to be honest most things other than front squats. KB Front Squats are great. Right now I use KB for FS, Swings, and Getups.

and just to note, that beast I was swinging was not back loaded. Its a fixed bell.
 

Pavel Macek

More than 2500 posts
Master Certified Instructor
Repetition snatches/swings - I prefer kettlebells.

Low rep "Olympic style" snatches/swing-snatches - I prefer dumbbell.

I love both kettlebell and dumbbell clean and press.

As for bent press and get-up, same thing - but kettlebell is imho way better tool for learning these two lifts.
 

Jeff Roark

Triple-Digit Post Count
Repetition snatches/swings - I prefer kettlebells.

Low rep "Olympic style" snatches/swing-snatches - I prefer dumbbell.

I love both kettlebell and dumbbell clean and press.

As for bent press and get-up, same thing - but kettlebell is imho way better tool for learning these two lifts.
I agree. The KB makes learning the get-up and bent press much easier. Using a barbell is a beast on these two exercises.
 

Pavel Macek

More than 2500 posts
Master Certified Instructor
light-heavy-dumbbells-old-time-strongman-eugene-sandow.jpg

Health & Strength: Light vs. Heavy Dumbbells

When you read about the incredible feats of the many old time strongman – and then you study their books – you will certainly notice that many of them recommend high rep exercises with very light weights, and only in the end occasionally mention lifting the heavy weights.

Did really Sandow achieved his incredible feats of strength by lifting light dumbbells? How about his mentor, prof. Attila? In 1913, Richard K. Fox has published a book called Prof. Attila’s Five Pound Dumb Bell Exercises. Attila’s scrapbook however shows many women practicing with big globe dumbbells certainly way heavier than five pounds, and altogether different exercises than alternating curls – get-ups and one arm presses…
Read the full article here: Health & Strength: Light vs. Heavy Dumbbells | SIMPLEXSTRONG
 
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