Short Thoughts on Martial Arts I've Done

BCman

Triple-Digit Post Count
I remember reading some where that the mind is the most powerful component for learning anything that you want to perfect physically. In this study they took three groups of people and they were all tested at basket ball free throws. Then group one never practiced again until next time they tested. Group two practiced every day for some specific amount of time. And group three only practice for the same amount of time as group two, but only in their mind.(imagination) When they retested the three groups, group one never improved at all. No surprise! Group two improved of course. But group three that only practiced in their minds also improved. Not quite as much as group two, but definitely a significant amount!

I also heard a story of a POW in Vietnam, that practice playing several rounds of golf, in his mind every day, while being held prisoner for several years. When he eventually got back to the States, He went and played golf and was far better then he was before going to war.

That is why shadow boxing, forms or kata, hitting the heavy bag, and things like that actually work at improving your abilities at fighting.
When you're young, spar as much as you can. But when you get older, or life just gets in the way, you can still hold onto your abilities and still actually improve just through using your mind.

When people that compete at different strength events, go to do their lift, they (the best anyway)first visualize themselves completing the lift first. But if they're really smart, they will be visualizing themselves completing those lifts many times every day, before that completion day even arrives.

Al
 

Smile-n-Nod

More than 500 posts
but family is first and now with my baby girl priorities are other. But I hope I will do something again, I really miss it
Think of all that training that you've done as preparation for this really important (and rewarding) part of your life. Sure, you may not be able to train as much right now, but you'll get back to it at, some level, eventually.

(Congratulations, by the way!)
 

pet'

More than 5000 posts
Hello,

To a certain extent, I think the most beautiful present we can offer to our family is being healthy (and strong if possible), to be here for them when this is necessary.

Spirit and readiness are mandatory IMO. Practicing with seriousness my shadow boxing / tension and relaxation / breathing maintain me vivavicous and aware

Kind regards,

Pet'
 

Steve Freides

Forum Administrator
Senior Certified Instructor
@BCman, I think there's a lot of truth to what you're saying. As a life-long music student, I've continued to learn new instruments throughout the course of my life, and I continue to marvel that, at some instruments and some times, I get better with little or no practice. I can't say that it's the same thing as the activities you mentioned but I think it is.

NB: This doesn't always work, and there are some instruments that I simply must practice in order to improve, so I'm convinced there is a limit to improvement through visualization, but I don't confess not to understand when it works and when it doesn't.

-S-
 

pet'

More than 5000 posts
Hello,

Instruments, moves, type of martial arts may obey by a kind of rule "the more we learn, the more we are able to learn". At least, this is the case for me. I think that when one reaches a certain point, we get carry-over.

Kind regards,

Pet'
 

Kozushi

More than 2500 posts
Totally. It's like my quest for strength building wisdom that started 18 months ago. All the exercises are connected in that they need to develop strength. All instruments are connected in that they develop sound. All books are connected in that they develop ideas. All languages are connected in that they develop words. same same same.
 

Kozushi

More than 2500 posts
They're all good stuff. Which one is better is just like with weights, it depends on the goals you've got. There's also the same kind of tradeoff as with weights in that the more "effective" martial arts take more out of you. Even though I'm not primarily a BJJ guy nor would I even identify as a BJJ guy, I think BJJ is the "S&S" of martial arts - it's perfectly safe, not overly taxing, non threatening, and will train you in as much self-defence as you're likely ever going to need while at the same time fulfilling your need for something healthy, and decently athletic and sporty to do.
For myself, Judo is more practical since it trains you in knocking people off their feet and onto the ground, and that's definitely something I want to be able to do fast and hard if I need to! Then there's the follow up training on the ground which is kind of the same thing as what BJJ is.
Doing karate without hardening the hands seems like a betrayal of karate. With the hardening of the hands, karate is like the "Naked Warrior" programme of martial arts - you can do it with no one, no equipment, and anywhere at any time.
Boxing is real gladiator training, but what about the brain? Probably not good to bash your brain all the time.
Kendo and fencing are the same thing. Anyone who has done both kendo and sabre fencing knows this. Interestingly, kendo allows the two sword style and a kind of cherrypicking "jodan" style too. In fencing, because the sword is so light, your hips and knees have to work harder and faster and I don't think this is good. In kendo, your upper body takes more of the brunt of the fighting and it's more safely balanced over the whole body. You aren't as likely to develop knee or hip problems. The ultra-light fencing swords are supposed to be "ergonomic" but actually this just forces your lower body to work unnaturally hard because the action is too fast so I think this is problematic.

The thing linking them all is the need for strength.
 

Steve Freides

Forum Administrator
Senior Certified Instructor
I studied TKD for a while, but I'm not doing it now. I think the question was what are you currently doing, not what have you done.

-S-
 

offwidth

More than 5000 posts
Yes the 'spirit' of the question was for either active practitioners, or those that were involved in it for so many years that they are never really de-active (if that makes any sense:))
 

Kozushi

More than 2500 posts
Chinups (not pullups) have been adding a LOT to my kendo ability. I thought I'd share this. I think the combination of lats and biceps activation is why. I can cut down very strongly and swiftly without getting tired like I used to.
 

dc

More than 300 posts
Even though I'm not primarily a BJJ guy nor would I even identify as a BJJ guy, I think BJJ is the "S&S" of martial arts - it's perfectly safe, not overly taxing, non threatening, and will train you in as much self-defence as you're likely ever going to need
I disagree with the last part of this quote. I'm not a fan of the arts that require you to hit the ground for self defence. In my experience this is a recipe for getting your head kicked in.
 

Pavel Macek

More than 2500 posts
Master Certified Instructor
As for ground fighting for reality-based self-defence: standup grappling and positional skills on the ground are a must. I.e. avoid ground at all costs, but if you happen to get on the ground, get into a better position and standup.
 

dc

More than 300 posts
standup grappling and positional skills on the ground are a must.
I agree. Partly
avoid ground at all costs, but if you happen to get on the ground, get into a better position and standup.
I agree. Fully
will train you in as much self-defence as you're likely ever going to need
That's the part I disagree with.
Personally when it comes to ground fighting from a purely self defence point of view being able to avoid going to the ground & getting back up if you end up there is all you need to know. I'm not talking about self defence from a occupational view point eg police, security etc where controlling/subduing people is required, purely the average punter trying to keep out of harms way.
I've met & trained with many martial artists who are very good at what they do, but have very little experience in actually defending themselves in a real life situation. I also know people that have had to defend themselves on many occasions & have zero martial arts training. Being a person who has competed in various martial arts & caught up in quite a few real life situations I'd much rather the latter person standing next to me when things turn ugly.
 
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Harry Westgate

More than 500 posts
Agree with @Pavel Macek and @dc. Skills for self defence IMO should revolve around (in order of importance): stand up striking, mixed with a bit of stand up grappling/clinching, and avoiding the ground but having an idea of what to do if you get there (i.e. get back on your feet).

As such, BJJ as a lone discipline is simply not a viable self defence option.
 
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