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Off-Topic Simple Game Changers

Don Fairbanks

SFG II
Certified Instructor
I think the biggest game changer for me was the idea that meaning comes responsibility. That brought me out of a long and dark time in my life when everything I thought I was and was going to be had been ripped away. I no longer thought I had a purpose or meaning. This idea restored meaning to my life, and has kept me moving forward since; it has provided a center.

For training, the biggest game changer was when I left barbells and powerlifting and learned that there was a way to train that allowed me to get up and down off the ground without having to brace myself for the pain. Leaving barbells for a time may have left me weaker at barbells, but it has drastically improved my quality of life. Strength and fitness can be built in many ways, and finding a way that doesn't hurt is not only possible but recommended.
Jordan Peterson influence ?
 

wespom9

Level 6 Valued Member
Certified Instructor
Jordan Peterson is a little bit of an enigma to me. I have both his books, listened to him on podcasts. His books show some depth, some interesting thoughts and conclusions. He definitely has some good info. I find myself telling people "his books will make you think", rather than "you will really enjoy this book" ; though that doesn't mean I don't like it
 

Coyotl

Level 6 Valued Member
Jordan Peterson is a little bit of an enigma to me. I have both his books, listened to him on podcasts. His books show some depth, some interesting thoughts and conclusions. He definitely has some good info. I find myself telling people "his books will make you think", rather than "you will really enjoy this book" ; though that doesn't mean I don't like it
Very true, definitely makes you think and it is often challenging. I've really enjoyed listening to his podcasts/lectures when I walk or run. His Maps of Meaning series was really interesting, it makes you think about the levels of symbolism something can be understood at.
 

the hansenator

Level 6 Valued Member
For me it's the yoga pushup.

I struggled with left shoulder problems for years. I thought I'd never do a pushup again, or most other upper body exercises. A surgery left a scar going from the bottom of my left pec to the armpit and kind of messed up the serratus and a couple other things.

I found that if I relaxed a certain way during yoga pushups it didn't hurt and it made the correct muscles do the work. As the strength improved I found I could do other exercises again and now my shoulder has only a few limitations. No other exercise, doctor, or physical therapist could help as much as the yoga pushup has.
 

acutaiar12

Level 6 Valued Member
1. Training strength as a skill vs. working out and feeling broken
2. Rescuing a dog
3. Learning a foreign language
4. Learning and dedicating myself to a martial art
5. Volunteering in community
Learning foreign languages is definitely a game changer! Which language did you learn?
 

Bauer

Level 7 Valued Member
Learning to cook Indian dals (from a cookbook by Meera Sodha), for pleasure, but also for meal prep.

For example, this red lentil dal is cheap, nutritious, easy to cook (once getting used to the Indian style of cooking), delicious - and easy to store, and easy to reheat in a microwave. I also cook a batch of rice in advance, and serve it with plain yoghurt. Another great one it this chickpeas curry.

This was a real gamce changer for me when all restaurants, bistros and canteens had to close during lockdown and I still wanted to eat a good meal at work.
 

solarbear

Level 5 Valued Member

The entire interview is incredibly interesting. But the idea that you should work out till you feel good has been a real game-changer for me. I'd always used the harder is better philosophy that most people follow and left myself in a broken heap for a couple of days afterward.
 

Pete L

Level 5 Valued Member
Learning foreign languages is definitely a game changer! Which language did you learn?
I studied Spanish and French as a child and failed both.
I got opportunity to live in Padova, Italy for 18 months at the age of 30. Wonderful people, food and climate.
English is ubiquitous and I enjoyed finding the quieter places where people would entertain speaking to me despite how bad I was.
Learning Italian taught me things about my own language English that I may have never learnt had I not gone.
 

bluejeff

Level 6 Valued Member
For me it's the yoga pushup.

I struggled with left shoulder problems for years. I thought I'd never do a pushup again, or most other upper body exercises. A surgery left a scar going from the bottom of my left pec to the armpit and kind of messed up the serratus and a couple other things.

I found that if I relaxed a certain way during yoga pushups it didn't hurt and it made the correct muscles do the work. As the strength improved I found I could do other exercises again and now my shoulder has only a few limitations. No other exercise, doctor, or physical therapist could help as much as the yoga pushup has.
I love shoulder movements like that. Out of curiosity, do you (personally) push up and then open the shoulders, or do you push up and open shoulders at the same time?
 

acutaiar12

Level 6 Valued Member
I studied Spanish and French as a child and failed both.
I got opportunity to live in Padova, Italy for 18 months at the age of 30. Wonderful people, food and climate.
English is ubiquitous and I enjoyed finding the quieter places where people would entertain speaking to me despite how bad I was.
Learning Italian taught me things about my own language English that I may have never learnt had I not gone.
Studying a second language is a great thing to do. I lived in Oaxaca, Mexico for 2 months and Salamanca, Spain for 4 months. Speaking Spanish gave me the opportunity to travel the world and meet some really cool people. I’ll be in Lima, Peru for about a month soon.
 

the hansenator

Level 6 Valued Member
I push and open at the same time. It doesn’t work as well for me if I separate them. I have trouble moving into down dog from a plank, my left shoulder shifts out of alignment as I move. But if I push into down dog from a push-up it’s fine.
 

Bauer

Level 7 Valued Member

The entire interview is incredibly interesting. But the idea that you should work out till you feel good has been a real game-changer for me. I'd always used the harder is better philosophy that most people follow and left myself in a broken heap for a couple of days afterward.
That is a nice excerpt, I like his philosophy. Very much in line with StrongFirst and Original Strength. It could be summarized with my favourite, actually game-changing quote from Tim Anderson:

"It feels good to feel good."

I sometimes struggle with the application of it (notice the irony) and it seems like a no-brainer, but actually, it is a really powerful guiding principle.
 

Mo04

Level 5 Valued Member
Yeah, it's the Bridge - L-Sit - Seated Twist. Done in that order and each held for 20 seconds. Of course, you only do the level of the movement that's completely controllable for you. Some can hold a full gymnastics bridge while people like me, can only hold a straight bridge or reverse plank.

Just wanted to say thanks - I've been doing the Trifecta for a few days now: 20 seconds of Bridge, then L-Sit, then Seated Twisted. I must say I feel real benefit in my lower back - a sense of looseness and freedom. I'm thinking this might become a Game Changer for me! Thanks again.
 
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