Sleep!

steve-in-kville

Level 1 Valued Member
Not exactly diet & nutrition, but I feel its just as important, and honestly didn't know what other sub-forum to post under.

I'm moving about every day. Whether its a run, ruck march or just a brisk walk for recovery, I'm doing something. I had two "zero" days so far this month due to rain, and I simply need a rest day. I do work a physical job in a warehouse, although I do have a desk and have "desk work" that needs to be done throughout the day.

I start work early, the alarm goes off at 4am and I'm up and about shortly thereafter. I am a few weeks into my program and I need 8 hours of sleep, day in, day out. Even on the weekends I may manage to sleep in an extra hour, but my biological clock has me awake before sunrise which is around 6:30am right now, I think.

My question is, will I become more efficient with my sleep as I get into better shape? Or will I always need eight hours every night? I read that some pro-athletes are pushing ten hours/night, but that's their career.

I plan to keep up the rucks into the winter and hopefully more frequently, as I am only doing one per week thus far. Hope to up that to three max.
 

Mo04

Level 5 Valued Member
I'm currently reading Why We Sleep by Matthew Walker.

So far in the book (I'm about a third way through), he's stated 8 hours of sleep is the minimum required. Younger people (from babies to teens) need more sleep: 10-12 hours. Adults in general need 8 hours - never less.

He hasnt discussed athletes specifically and nothing yet about any harms of oversleep (if that is even possible). My impression is that he sees sleep as restorative and the more sleep you get the more benefits you gain - the more the better.

The quality of sleep is judged partly by the amount of time the sleeping brain stays in NREM and REM phases of sleep. The longer you spend in each phase, the more unique benefits you gain from each phase. Left to sleep without external interference (such as alarm clock), your internal circadian clock will pull you out of slumber at the exact best time personalised to you.

Will you become more efficient with sleep as you get into better shape? No. It is always 8 hours.
 
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Don Fairbanks

SFG II
Certified Instructor
I usually see the ranges set at 7-9 hrs per night for most folks and a few outliers on both ends. As to your question, your quality of sleep could improve with increased health/fitness. Big difference from cycling through 5 ninety minute sleep cycles and tossing around all night. Some sport watches have an excellent sleep tracking app as well as something like the Oura Ring.
 

Don Fairbanks

SFG II
Certified Instructor
I'm currently reading Why We Sleep by Matthew Walker.

So far in the book (I'm about a third way through), he's stated 8 hours of sleep is the minimum required. Younger people (from babies to teens) need more sleep: 10-12 hours. Adults in general need 8 hours - never less.

He hasnt discussed athletes specifically and nothing yet about any harms of oversleep (if that is even possible). My impression is that he sees sleep as restorative and the more sleep you get the more benefits you gain - the more the better.

The quality of sleep is judged partly by the amount of time the sleeping brain stays in NREM and REM phases of sleep. The longer you spend in each phase, the more unique benefits you gain from each phase. Left to sleep without external interference (such as alarm clock), your internal circadian clock will pull you out of slumber at the exact best time personalised to you.
Good book, and a good podcast on Rogan a while back.
 

pet'

Level 8 Valued Member
Hello,

I usually sleep better when I exercise because physical activity is a stress release.

Otherwise, I also try to avoid using my phone before going to bed, reduce light intensity, eat in moderate amount in the evening. I also take a cold shower. It reduces body temperature and prepares it for sleep.

Kind regards,

Pet'
 

ShawnM

Level 8 Valued Member
Not exactly diet & nutrition, but I feel its just as important, and honestly didn't know what other sub-forum to post under.

I'm moving about every day. Whether its a run, ruck march or just a brisk walk for recovery, I'm doing something. I had two "zero" days so far this month due to rain, and I simply need a rest day. I do work a physical job in a warehouse, although I do have a desk and have "desk work" that needs to be done throughout the day.

I start work early, the alarm goes off at 4am and I'm up and about shortly thereafter. I am a few weeks into my program and I need 8 hours of sleep, day in, day out. Even on the weekends I may manage to sleep in an extra hour, but my biological clock has me awake before sunrise which is around 6:30am right now, I think.

My question is, will I become more efficient with my sleep as I get into better shape? Or will I always need eight hours every night? I read that some pro-athletes are pushing ten hours/night, but that's their career.

I plan to keep up the rucks into the winter and hopefully more frequently, as I am only doing one per week thus far. Hope to up that to three max.
I'm pretty much the opposite of everyone that has posted so far. I probably get 5 hours a night. I was in the military for nearly three decades and deployed a ton so my body has gotten used to this amount. I am in bed my 1900 every evening and usually awake talking to myself in the dark by 0300. I have sleep apnea and use a CPAP so that does help my sleep quality. I wake feeling fine and have little to no issues with energy throughout the day. When for whatever reason I sleep more than six hours for whatever reason I'm generally slower and lacking energy, those tend to be the days I don't muster up any type of training at all.
 

steve-in-kville

Level 1 Valued Member
Thanks for the replies. My routine is pretty basic: No screen time within a half hour before lights out. That includes TV, my laptop or phone. I read for maybe 20 minutes before, and I can tell when I have re-read what I just did read.... its time hit the pillow. I may lay away for a few minutes before dozing off. Typically, I wake up around 2-ish to use the bathroom, although lately its been closer to midnight, not sure why.
 

wespom9

Level 6 Valued Member
Certified Instructor
I believe in shooting for 8 hours of sleep. For me this means 8 SLEEPING, so about 8:30 in bed. I fall asleep fairly quickly, rarely longer than 15-20 mins. In bed at 10:00, up around 6:30
 

offwidth

Level 9 Valued Member
I get 8 hours of sleep a day... what I get at night is extra...

Seriously though... I‘ve never bought into the 8 hr business (for all) some people probably require a lot more, others do fine on less.
I went on about 6hrs for decades, living a very active and stressful life. Quality of sleep is likely more important. Also I think one can train and adapt to less sleep than they might believe that they do.
 

Don Fairbanks

SFG II
Certified Instructor
Thanks for the replies. My routine is pretty basic: No screen time within a half hour before lights out. That includes TV, my laptop or phone. I read for maybe 20 minutes before, and I can tell when I have re-read what I just did read.... its time hit the pillow. I may lay away for a few minutes before dozing off. Typically, I wake up around 2-ish to use the bathroom, although lately its been closer to midnight, not sure why.
Some things that could wake you up other than drinking water prior to bed.Stress,alcohol, caffeine (long half life in some ) eating within a 6 hour window of the half point of sleep cycle, for you on a 8pm to 4am cycle, midnight is half point, 6 hours prior would be 6pm, food intolerances like histamine and others, over training,mouth breathing.
 
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IMayAgainKnowChris

Level 5 Valued Member
Since my wife and I had our baby I don’t think I’ve slept more than 3-4 hours at a time and def no more than 6-7 a night.

it’s brutal. But what am I gonna do? Not train? Lol. I just suck it up and live a miserably tired life. Just try to eat enough and not skip training.
 

steve-in-kville

Level 1 Valued Member
Is it Mark Wahlberg that goes to bed at 7pm and gets up at 3am to workout, do his prayers & play golf... al before the rest of the family is out of bed?!
 

Don Fairbanks

SFG II
Certified Instructor
Is it Mark Wahlberg that goes to bed at 7pm and gets up at 3am to workout, do his prayers & play golf... al before the rest of the family is out of bed?!
I like it. Although one round of golf takes about the same amount of time as five solid training sessions. Being outside for that amount of time is also excellent, IMO.
 

steve-in-kville

Level 1 Valued Member
Just wondering what the rest of his family do when he goes to bed, after 7pm. Maybe weight lifting?

I get the impression his "family time" takes place earlier in the day. I think I also read that he recently transitioned the entire family to a meat-less diet. A bit shocking since his family owns a chain of burger joints!
 

FairFrank

First Post
Thanks for the replies. My routine is pretty basic: No screen time within a half hour before lights out. That includes TV, my laptop or phone. I read for maybe 20 minutes before, and I can tell when I have re-read what I just did read.... its time hit the pillow. I may lay away for a few minutes before dozing off. Typically, I wake up around 2-ish to use the bathroom, although lately its been closer to midnight, not sure why.
+ for that. We’ve become too dependent on gadgets and at least we have to be free of it before bed
 

Tobias K.

Level 4 Valued Member
I pretty much need eight hours of sleep regardless of physical activity. I have no problems with falling asleep. Right before I go to bed I'm either stretching or doing about 20 minutes of soft tissue work on a roller or ball. This is pretty much the signal for my brain that it is bedtime.

I have an eye on a Chili sleeping system, but I'm still undecided because of the relatively high price. I like to sleep with colder temperatures and heard a lot of positives from Kelly Starrett though.
 

Rumsmike

Level 4 Valued Member
I have an eye on a Chili sleeping system, but I'm still undecided because of the relatively high price.
I can highly recommend this. Took me a long time to convince my wife because of the price but she loves it now. I keep mine coolish around 68 degrees and she cranks her side up to maximum about a half an before bed and claims it's like climbing into fresh warm sheets straight from the dryer. Cozy wife cozy life 😁.
 

dalton

Level 1 Valued Member
Planning tasks for whole day is really hard, when you are living a busy life. Sleep is most commonly affected when you've stress of workload, I've achieved success in getting 8-10 hours of sleep by managing my whole day tasks. Exercise is a good way of releasing chemicals that help in reducing stress and aid in sleep. So following a schedule in which your sleep time and other entertainment is prioritized, is the key to success.
 
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