Slight twist in hips during deadlift

doblersdream

More than Five Posts
Hey folks, i have a PT training client who's hips are rotating a little to the right during a deadlift. They had some work done a few weeks ago with a physio who said their left posterior from glute up into lats was very tight, but they worked on it to loosed it up and the client doesn't feel any discomfort there anymore. From a proprioception viewpoint, the client isn't aware of the slight rotation.

Anyone any experience of this happening? Could there be other factors involved contributing to this?

Thanks in advance

Phil
 

the hansenator

More than 500 posts
I have a problem like that. I wasn't even aware of it until I watched myself in a mirror. I have some medical history but the physical therapist gave me exercises to strengthen the inner thigh on one side and the glute on the other to try to straighten me out.
 

Anna C

> 6k Posts
Elite Certified Instructor
Yes, I have something like that myself, in the "other factors" department.

I had noticed a few oddities with the right hip in the last 10 years or so. Last year when I was going through screening for kidney donor surgery, they found a "5.8 cm lipoma in the right iliopsoas muscle" on a CT scan. It's harmless, and nothing to do about it, but it explains why I often have a hip shift during heavy squats, my right knee tends to be farther out when I sit on a bike, and a few other miscellaneous movement issues that I might have otherwise thought I needed to do something about.

Sometimes there's a good reason for things that we can't see, and can't fix. Lesson for me is don't fret about it... just keep training. It's inconsequential. Not to say that's always the case, but it's good to be aware that it sometimes is.
 

doblersdream

More than Five Posts
Yes, I have something like that myself, in the "other factors" department.

I had noticed a few oddities with the right hip in the last 10 years or so. Last year when I was going through screening for kidney donor surgery, they found a "5.8 cm lipoma in the right iliopsoas muscle" on a CT scan. It's harmless, and nothing to do about it, but it explains why I often have a hip shift during heavy squats, my right knee tends to be farther out when I sit on a bike, and a few other miscellaneous movement issues that I might have otherwise thought I needed to do something about.

Sometimes there's a good reason for things that we can't see, and can't fix. Lesson for me is don't fret about it... just keep training. It's inconsequential. Not to say that's always the case, but it's good to be aware that it sometimes is.
Hmmm I would worry that it might be consequential in terms of training an imbalanced movement pattern - wouldn’t that just perpetuate whatever issue was causing the twist?
 

Anna C

> 6k Posts
Elite Certified Instructor
Hmmm I would worry that it might be consequential in terms of training an imbalanced movement pattern - wouldn’t that just perpetuate whatever issue was causing the twist?
I don't know. I'm just going to keep training, myself, since the issue (that I know exists, but only think is related to movement issues, don't know for sure) is not something that needs to be or can be addressed medically. What else can be done? Personally I believe the body and cerebellum can figure out how to get around issues better than our prefrontal cortex can.
 

doblersdream

More than Five Posts
Hopefully someone has some experience of correcting this as I’m not keen on letting my client keep twisting while deadlifting
 

Steve Freides

Forum Administrator
Senior Certified Instructor
Elite Certified Instructor
Hopefully someone has some experience of correcting this as I’m not keen on letting my client keep twisting while deadlifting
@doblersdream, welcome to the StrongFirst forum.

To continue the line of thinking @Anna C suggested, life is rarely perfectly symmetrical and some small differences, side to side, don't rise to the level of "imbalance." But you're right, some do rise to that level, and it would be great to have an expert, in-person diagnosis and opinion, which is why you and your client ought to consider a doctor's visit, or a Functional Movement Screen, or other medical professional of some sort.

Based on what you've said, we can't tell you if it's cause for concern or not, and even if you'd posted a video, we still might not be able to say for sure. Best take your concern to an expert and, heck, you might even just have an experienced powerlifter or two look at your client and get their opinions as your starting point.

-S-
 

Tirofijo

More than 500 posts
Is the client using a mixed grip? I know some experienced coaches prefer the hook grip or double overhand with straps to keep the bar from twisting.

I know you mentioned the hip is rotating. But just wondering if it’s the bar that’s rotating and that’s trickling down to the hip?

just a thought.
 

doblersdream

More than Five Posts
Is the client using a mixed grip? I know some experienced coaches prefer the hook grip or double overhand with straps to keep the bar from twisting.

I know you mentioned the hip is rotating. But just wondering if it’s the bar that’s rotating and that’s trickling down to the hip?

just a thought.
That’s an interesting one, thanks for that. He’s using a mixed grip but I’ll get reverse it or try different grips. Thanks again
 

elli

> 5k Posts
Hi there,
I am doing rear foot elevated DL recently and they are a game chanfer to me, they teach me a lof about weak points/rotation/hinging and the mind-muscle-connection/ posterior chain.
I can spot the point where a slight rotation occurs more easily now and start working towards more balance. Right side is lacking a bit behind strengthwise.
MHO and experience :)
 

doblersdream

More than Five Posts
Hi there,
I am doing rear foot elevated DL recently and they are a game chanfer to me, they teach me a lof about weak points/rotation/hinging and the mind-muscle-connection/ posterior chain.
I can spot the point where a slight rotation occurs more easily now and start working towards more balance. Right side is lacking a bit behind strengthwise.
MHO and experience :)
Very helpful, thank you 🙏🏻
 

Steve Freides

Forum Administrator
Senior Certified Instructor
Elite Certified Instructor
He’s using a mixed grip
That's important information to know. Always good to balance the two over/under grips, saving the preferred way for maximum attempts. Even better is to use double overhand as the weights allow, then switch to the mixed grip when it gets heavier.

-S-
 

Timo Keskitalo

Triple-Digit Post Count
I have a similar issue also, one of many. Overall tightness in lower back and hips. One reason could be that my right leg is maybe 1-1,5cm shorter.

The thing is that I've had this before, and length difference was even bigger to my recollection. I started to use a pad under right heel. Then at some point I bought new shoes and felt that I don't need the pad anymore. It was fine like that for a long time.

So which comes first? Reasons can be many, and solutions. I've learned that there are two types of physios, those who treat the symptoms and those who fix the issues.
 

Chrisdavisjr

> 1k Posts
Even better is to use double overhand as the weights allow, then switch to the mixed grip when it gets heavier.
It might be worth learning the hook grip used by weightlifters and some powerlifters to keep everything as symmetrical as possible. If you're not under competition conditions, I see no harm in using straps with a double overhand grip as well. Since I started practising the hook grip and using straps, I've found that deadlifts feel much better and I can maintain better overall alignment and bar path.
 

Steve Freides

Forum Administrator
Senior Certified Instructor
Elite Certified Instructor
@Chrisdavisjr, just a note of caution that the hook grip is not going to be for everyone. I found it bothered my thumbs quite a bit and could never get used to it, although I did try, twice, even, a few years apart. For me, it wasn't that it hurt where I was gripping my thumb but it bothered the joint where the thumb meets the hand.

-S-
 

Chrisdavisjr

> 1k Posts
@Chrisdavisjr, just a note of caution that the hook grip is not going to be for everyone. I found it bothered my thumbs quite a bit and could never get used to it, although I did try, twice, even, a few years apart. For me, it wasn't that it hurt where I was gripping my thumb but it bothered the joint where the thumb meets the hand.

-S-
Indeed; it's not for everyone. I would recommend to those looking to incorporate it into their training that they try it with light weights and 'feel it out' before either going heavy or abandoning the idea altogether.
 
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