So I've Started Deadlifting

Status
Closed Thread. (Continue Discussion of This Topic by Starting a New Thread.)

MikeTheBear

Level 7 Valued Member
I recently purchased some used iron plates from a dealer in Ft Lupton, CO through eBay; I'm up to 520lbs of liftable iron, more than half bodyweight at 178lbs.
@JonS Thanks for the tip. I searched the Internets and found that dealer in Ft. Lupton. That place is like heaven. I will definitely drive up there some weekend.
 

JeffC

Level 7 Valued Member
A good barbell setup should have:
: a decent bar, minimum around $300
: 4-6 45's
: 2-4 25's, don't bother with 35's
: 4 10's
: 2 5's
: 2 2.5's
: camlock or spring clamps

Buying used is always the best option, but thoroughly inspect the bar for straightness and free spinning bearings.
 

JonS

Level 7 Valued Member
@JonS Thanks for the tip. I searched the Internets and found that dealer in Ft. Lupton. That place is like heaven. I will definitely drive up there some weekend.
I may have had you in mind when I mentioned it, to good of a dealer not to share with those in the greater Denver area ;)
 

william bad butt

Level 6 Valued Member
With lighter weights, my 2 favorite deadlifts are paused deadlifts (pausing for 1 second just below my knees) and also deficit deadlifts (I stand on 2 stacked 45 lb plates).

The paused deadlifts carry over great to my conventional deadlift. The deficit deadlift builds strength but it has a different movement groove. So I prefer the paused deadlift. For both movements, I typically use 50-70% of my training max (I am typically closer to the 50%).

A typical workout for me is a warm up with 2 hand kettlebell swings (focus on being explosive, ala shadow swings, I try to feel my deadlift stretch reflex). Next I train conventional deadlift, high intensity, low volume (typical linear periodization, every week intensity increases some and volume reduced some (this is an oversimplification but it is generally true)). Then do paused deadlifts with low intensity and much higher volume. Afterwards, some 1 handed kettlebell swings.
 

Kozushi

Level 7 Valued Member
With lighter weights, my 2 favorite deadlifts are paused deadlifts (pausing for 1 second just below my knees) and also deficit deadlifts (I stand on 2 stacked 45 lb plates).

The paused deadlifts carry over great to my conventional deadlift. The deficit deadlift builds strength but it has a different movement groove. So I prefer the paused deadlift. For both movements, I typically use 50-70% of my training max (I am typically closer to the 50%).

A typical workout for me is a warm up with 2 hand kettlebell swings (focus on being explosive, ala shadow swings, I try to feel my deadlift stretch reflex). Next I train conventional deadlift, high intensity, low volume (typical linear periodization, every week intensity increases some and volume reduced some (this is an oversimplification but it is generally true)). Then do paused deadlifts with low intensity and much higher volume. Afterwards, some 1 handed kettlebell swings.
That is very interesting and similar to something I had in mind to mix the benefits of swings with deadlifting.
 

Kozushi

Level 7 Valued Member
How high would one go for GPP-type deadlifting strength as opposed to monster strength? Would this be around 150% bodyweight?
 

Steve Freides

Staff
Senior Certified Instructor
Elite Certified Instructor
General consensus is two times bodyweight is an OK place to stop, although some folks say 2.5 times bodyweight. At your size, I'd say to aim for 400 lbs. or maybe 200 kg. For the SFL, you must be able to lift double bodyweight for a single rep, and there's also a 5-rep technique requirement with 1.5 x bodyweight.

Hey, if I can deadlift 400 lbs., you can deadlift 400 lbs. :)

-S-
 

Kozushi

Level 7 Valued Member
General consensus is two times bodyweight is an OK place to stop, although some folks say 2.5 times bodyweight. At your size, I'd say to aim for 400 lbs. or maybe 200 kg. For the SFL, you must be able to lift double bodyweight for a single rep, and there's also a 5-rep technique requirement with 1.5 x bodyweight.

Hey, if I can deadlift 400 lbs., you can deadlift 400 lbs. :)

-S-
Aha! That's fantastic info, thank you!
 

Kozushi

Level 7 Valued Member
I set the bar to 250lbs and am doing sets of 5 reps with no problem. It does feel heavy enough to be a good exercise for me for the moment. I like how with barbell it isn't about putting more power into it - the weight forces me to put strength into it, and there is no arguing with the validity of absolute weight. 250lbs means 250lbs - nothing virtual about it. I am also hoping that deadlifting will help me to attain Sinister.
 

Kozushi

Level 7 Valued Member
General consensus is two times bodyweight is an OK place to stop, although some folks say 2.5 times bodyweight. At your size, I'd say to aim for 400 lbs. or maybe 200 kg. For the SFL, you must be able to lift double bodyweight for a single rep, and there's also a 5-rep technique requirement with 1.5 x bodyweight.

Hey, if I can deadlift 400 lbs., you can deadlift 400 lbs. :)

-S-
I've got all my plates on my barbell again, which adds up to 280lbs total. I tend to do sets of 5 reps (of course putting the barbell down on the floor between reps). It's certainly heavy enough that I really feel like I'm doing something important by lifting it up, but I also get the impression that I could lift significantly more for a one rep max. In any case I suppose it's good to play it safe and not try to go too heavy too quickly.
 

Sean M

Level 6 Valued Member
I've got all my plates on my barbell again, which adds up to 280lbs total. I tend to do sets of 5 reps (of course putting the barbell down on the floor between reps). It's certainly heavy enough that I really feel like I'm doing something important by lifting it up, but I also get the impression that I could lift significantly more for a one rep max. In any case I suppose it's good to play it safe and not try to go too heavy too quickly.
That’s what I found when I started deadlifting in July. I did the Daily Dose plan (5 singles at 75% 5 days a week, a little heavier on Saturday) which only got above 90% for about 10 reps out of ~265 between 75-90% for the program. Very comfortable for skill development.
 

Kozushi

Level 7 Valued Member
That’s what I found when I started deadlifting in July. I did the Daily Dose plan (5 singles at 75% 5 days a week, a little heavier on Saturday) which only got above 90% for about 10 reps out of ~265 between 75-90% for the program. Very comfortable for skill development.
How heavy did you set your bar?

The 280lbs does seem right for me. It certainly feels "very heavy" but at the same time isn't killing me.
 

Steve Freides

Staff
Senior Certified Instructor
Elite Certified Instructor
@Kozushi, it sounds like 280 might be your 75%-ish number, but there's no hurry. Once in a while try a little heavier and see how you do. You're right - there's no hurry, and so long as the weight is heavy enough to make you stronger, you're good.

If you'd like to try something different, instead of just sets of 5, try a 54321 workout. You will need more plates, but the idea is that you might do something like this:

280 lbs. x 5
280 lbs. x 4
300 lbs. x 3
300 lbs. x 2
320 lbs. x 1

You could work into this, e.g., do 280 x 5, 300 x 3 one day and see what it feels like.

-S-
 

Sean M

Level 6 Valued Member
How heavy did you set your bar?

The 280lbs does seem right for me. It certainly feels "very heavy" but at the same time isn't killing me.
I pulled 230 for a single after a week of grooving the move at lighter weights (after getting a 300lb Olympic barbell set), as my baseline 1RM. So my first cycle was at 175. A set of 5 would’ve been hard, but 5 singles with 60-90 seconds rest barely broke a sweat - but the volume did the work and every rep was 100% crisp and fresh.
 

Steve Freides

Staff
Senior Certified Instructor
Elite Certified Instructor
I've been doing the Daily Dose Deadlift. My main modification, which I consider an accommodation to my age, is that I spread it out by lifting 4 days of each 7 instead of 5 days of each 7. I follow the plan's recommendations for which lifting day in the cycle to go heavier, so, e.g., e.g., my first heavier day is Day #7, but my Day #7 comes on Thursday of the second week instead of Tuesday. I take Wednesdays off and lift Mon/Tue/Thu/Fri as a rule. But I still do a total of about 45 lifting sessions before the test or competition at the end, as the program suggests.

-S-
 

Sean M

Level 6 Valued Member
Do you guys lift the barbell every day or every second day or...?
I did it as written - Monday through Friday @ 75%, progressively heavier sets of 1 on Saturdays, Sundays off. Like I said - the volume does the work, the plan is practically GTG for deadlifts.
 

Steve Freides

Staff
Senior Certified Instructor
Elite Certified Instructor
I did it as written - Monday through Friday @ 75%, progressively heavier sets of 1 on Saturdays, Sundays off. Like I said - the volume does the work, the plan is practically GTG for deadlifts.
@Sean M, that's not my understanding of how it's written. I believe you're supposed to lift Mon/Tue/Wed/Thu/Fri the first week, take off Sat/Sun, lift Mon the next week - and now you're up to 6 sessions, so Tuesday becomes your 80%. Then you lift Wed/Thu/Fri/Mon/Tue/Wed for your next six days, and Thursday of the following week is your 85% day. And so on. As you've described what you're doing, you're lifting 6 days out of 7, not 5 days out of 7.

-S-
 
Status
Closed Thread. (Continue Discussion of This Topic by Starting a New Thread.)
Top Bottom