Stamina

Discussion in 'Other' started by JoeF2000, Dec 10, 2018.

  1. JoeF2000

    JoeF2000 Still New to StrongFirst Forum

    Will only low intensity running help with high intensity fights that last anywhere from 5-30 minutes?
     
    Last edited: Dec 10, 2018
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  2. North Coast Miller

    North Coast Miller Quadruple-Digit Post Count

    No. You will need other endurance work as well.

    It will not only help but is essential, just not by itself.
     
    Last edited: Dec 10, 2018
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  3. JoeF2000

    JoeF2000 Still New to StrongFirst Forum

    Other endurance work as in sprints, metcons, shadow boxing, etc?
     
  4. North Coast Miller

    North Coast Miller Quadruple-Digit Post Count

    All the above tho a little bit of metcon goes a long way.
     
  5. JoeF2000

    JoeF2000 Still New to StrongFirst Forum

    Thanks, I appreciate the insight.
     
  6. Sean M

    Sean M Quadruple-Digit Post Count

  7. pet'

    pet' More than 5000 posts

    Hello,

    As a boxer, by tradition, stamina is built using two ways (both are necessary):
    - low slow distance (called 'roadwork'), about 45 minutes, on an easy pace (kind of MAF), at least 3-4 times a week (depending on the level and goal)
    - HIT (hill sprint, MetCon, Tabata, etc...) 2-3 times a weeks.

    On SF, most advocated A+A though.

    Kind regards,

    Pet'
     
  8. Al Ciampa

    Al Ciampa Quadruple-Digit Post Count Certified Instructor

    Just to clarify, A+A should not be used as a replacement for either roadwork or the higher-intensity work part of an intelligently prepared peaking phase. It’s part of base training.
     
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  9. Waffles03

    Waffles03 Triple-Digit Post Count

    From my experience, running never really helped with my conditioning but it was great for weight management. The best carryover that I saw were doing 10 reps of burpees with 30 seconds of shadow boxing for 10 sets.
     
  10. Al Ciampa

    Al Ciampa Quadruple-Digit Post Count Certified Instructor

    Do you mean that running never directly developed a high level of condition required at peak? Or do you mean that it didn’t even lay the metabolic foundation with which to absorb the higher intensity training required to develop the high level of condition commensurate with a peak?

    How often, what duration, what intensity, and for how many years did you practice running and still see no carry over to a peak, if that’s what you meant?

    Assuming that you were properly executing “roadwork”, your the report of your experience does not reflect the norm.
     
  11. Bro Mo

    Bro Mo More than 500 posts

    I've found that low intensity training helps prep the body to recover well from high intensity and maintain better during high intensity efforts. I like a 3:1 ratio of low intensity to high intensity in a base or long-term program and a 2:2 ratio for a short-term program. Additionally, I like a 3:1 ratio of long-term to short-term programs.
     
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  12. offwidth

    offwidth More than 5000 posts

    Exactly!
     
  13. Al Ciampa

    Al Ciampa Quadruple-Digit Post Count Certified Instructor

    +1 to that plus one.
     
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  14. Waffles03

    Waffles03 Triple-Digit Post Count

    In regards to your last paragraph, I definitely agree because I’m sure you can take 5 other people and they will definitely have a different outcome from mines.

    How many years I have been practicing running, that’s a good question but if I were to pick a number, I would say 2 years prior to taking up boxing. The majority of my runs were 5 miles done at low intensity, 4-6 times a week. I would do hill sprints once or twice a week.

    For some reason, running never provided the peak conditioning needed for boxing. My guess is that the burpees provided similar sensation of fatigue similar to sparring that the carryover of conditioning was greater compared to running.
     
  15. Al Ciampa

    Al Ciampa Quadruple-Digit Post Count Certified Instructor

    This is expected. Jogging builds a base and doesn’t directly contribute to peak condition. However, it allows you to far better absorb the peaking training cycle.

    Thank you for your input.
     
  16. pet'

    pet' More than 5000 posts

    Hello,

    Running is not for peaking conditioning. As stated above, this is only a heart work base. It have been serving well all the fighters for decades. It also helps to maintain proper footwork during all the fight duration.

    It always has to be combined with skipping rope (but maybe I am a bit old school...)

    Kind regards,

    Pet'
     
  17. JCavin

    JCavin Double-Digit Post Count

    I don’t know if anything that is as useful as a large aerobic base when it comes to fitness.

    I know that we are StrongFirst here, and that strength is the easiest adaptation to make for a benefit across all other fitness domains.

    That being said, an aerobic base seems to stick around for a much longer period of time(from my own experience) than strength adaptations. Simply logging a few easy runs for a week or two allows me to easily run a 10k, even at a body weight 215+.

    There is no corresponding strength equivalent for myself. I can’t spend two weeks in a gym and suddenly be able to deadlift 405 again.

    Perhaps this is a genetic proclivity toward slow twitch/endurance activities.
     
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  18. Anna C

    Anna C More than 2500 posts Certified Instructor

    I think of it like spinning plates. Once you have the various plates spinning (fitness attributes established), you can put less effort in but you still have to come around and add the spinning momentum to keep it going.

    Or maybe the "spinning plates" would maintain your strength too, if you found the minimum effective dose for maintenance?
     
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  19. Anna C

    Anna C More than 2500 posts Certified Instructor

    This is funny because there are actually two ways to read this question.

    "Will running at only low intensity help...." Yes. Adding running at an intensity that stays low will help just about any fitness endeavor, especially those involving any type of conditioning.

    "Will doing conditioning that consists only of low intensity running help..." No. It might help a bit, but you'll need more than that to last through "high intensity fights that last anywhere from 5-30 minutes."

    Look for Joel Jamieson online -- he has some great resources for fighters and conditioning.
     
  20. JCavin

    JCavin Double-Digit Post Count

    You’re probably right, but I’ve always been someone who struggles with gaining massive amounts of strength. I ran novice LP multiple times, switched to intermediate programming and made a 500 pound pull. At a body weight of 230. It would be much more impressive at my current weight of 180.

    On the other hand, I ran a 20k mountain trail run and placed second overall with MUCH less trouble(my first ever race).

    To be sure, strength helped though. Don’t really know where I’m going with this other than to say that I think I’m genetically more capable of endurance related exercise than strength.
     
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