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Other/Mixed Step up

Other strength modalities (e.g., Clubs), mixed strength modalities (e.g., combined kettlebell and barbell), other goals (flexibility)

oab

Level 5 Valued Member
I use a lowish step platform for substitute for walking when the weather is bad.
In the standards for conventional stair step height: minimum 130mm, maximum 225mm. I use 225 mm.

225 is OK for my light long duration walking. However, for other uses a higher step height is applicable as Kenny and others have mentioned. In selecting that height, anthropometrics are a relevant consideration (not the only one, of course). A tall person has longer levers and so for a given knee and hip angle will need a higher step height that a shorter person with short levers. Considering anthropometetry a ninety degree seat of males involves popliteal height of something like 40-50cm from lower 5th to 95th upper percentile.

Adjustability either by a purchased device or through the use of pavers\blocks or similar as mentioned above can also help design the step height that is workable to goals and anthropometry.
 

pet'

Level 8 Valued Member
Hello,

@TedDK
In addition to the box height, as @Kenny Croxdale mentioned earlier you can hold to a rack or something to take balance out of the equation to place more load on the primary muscles (not the stabilizers then). It will also allow you to perform a slow eccentric, because step ups are concentrics

Kind regards,

Pet'
 

sizzlefuzz

Level 6 Valued Member
I remember hearing William Regal (professional wrestler) spoke highly of doing step ups for 45 minute blocks for his conditioning training. He would watch tapes of classic matches and try to keep moving the entire time. I believe this was on Colt Cabana's podcast if I remember correctly. They are hard to argue with... and also no excuses in the equipment department!
 

TedDK

Level 4 Valued Member
Hello,

@TedDK
In addition to the box height, as @Kenny Croxdale mentioned earlier you can hold to a rack or something to take balance out of the equation to place more load on the primary muscles (not the stabilizers then). It will also allow you to perform a slow eccentric, because step ups are concentrics

Kind regards,

Pet'
Its not the balance thats the problem on a High box.
 

Kenny Croxdale

Level 7 Valued Member
I remember hearing William Regal (professional wrestler) spoke highly of doing step ups for 45 minute blocks for his conditioning training.
Not Recommended

Performing Step Up for 45 minutes for a wrestler is not the optimal method for this sport.

45 Minutes of Steps Up is more effective (like Pet stated) for Steady State Endurance Training.

The Law of Specificity

This means a training program to replicate the sport being trained for.

Thus, 45 minutes of Step Ups does not match up with wrestling.

High Intensity Interval Training (HIIT) or High Intesity Interval Resistance Training (HIRT)

Wrestling falls into the High Intensity Interval Training Category.

Short intermittent highly intense periods with brief periods between them.

Thus, some type of HIIT or HIRT is more optimal for a wrestler.
 

sizzlefuzz

Level 6 Valued Member
Not Recommended

Performing Step Up for 45 minutes for a wrestler is not the optimal method for this sport.

45 Minutes of Steps Up is more effective (like Pet stated) for Steady State Endurance Training.

The Law of Specificity

This means a training program to replicate the sport being trained for.

Thus, 45 minutes of Step Ups does not match up with wrestling.

High Intensity Interval Training (HIIT) or High Intesity Interval Resistance Training (HIRT)

Wrestling falls into the High Intensity Interval Training Category.

Short intermittent highly intense periods with brief periods between them.

Thus, some type of HIIT or HIRT is more optimal for a wrestler.
Different wrestling, like WCW/WWE not Jordan Burroughs, etc.
 

pet'

Level 8 Valued Member
Hello,

Its not the balance thats the problem on a High box
I agree. I tend to use the "straight" leg (the other one already being on the box) to initiate the move. Then, at some point of the ROM, the leg on the box is more engaged to end up the step.

Kind regards,

Pet'
 

TedDK

Level 4 Valued Member
Hello,


I agree. I tend to use the "straight" leg (the other one already being on the box) to initiate the move. Then, at some point of the ROM, the leg on the box is more engaged to end up the step.

Kind regards,

Pet'
Its just feels like cheating.
 

Kenny Croxdale

Level 7 Valued Member
Different wrestling, like WCW/WWE
Not Different

First all this is, as you know, iit is Entertainment Acting with some type of Circus Type Gymastic Skills.

This type of Entertainment still falls into intermittent periods of intensity followed short intensity and with short to moderate breaks.

These Entertainers aren't performing in any type of Steady State Endurance for 45 minutes, non-stop.
 

pet'

Level 8 Valued Member
Hello @TedDK

What ?! Are you saying I am cheater ?!

All kidding aside, you are right. I have this issue when the box exceeds a certain height.

In natural environment (woods, mountains...) that's not an issue because I can keep up the pace. However, from a fitness standpoint and for hamstring strengthenning using this modality, it is....

Kind regards,

Pet'
 

TedDK

Level 4 Valued Member
Not Recommended

Performing Step Up for 45 minutes for a wrestler is not the optimal method for this sport.

45 Minutes of Steps Up is more effective (like Pet stated) for Steady State Endurance Training.

The Law of Specificity

This means a training program to replicate the sport being trained for.

Thus, 45 minutes of Step Ups does not match up with wrestling.

High Intensity Interval Training (HIIT) or High Intesity Interval Resistance Training (HIRT)

Wrestling falls into the High Intensity Interval Training Category.

Short intermittent highly intense periods with brief periods between them.

Thus, some type of HIIT or HIRT is more optimal for a wrestler.
It depends who you ask.
Joel Jamieson fx recommend LISS training alot to athletes in fx MMA.
 

BJJ Shawn

Level 6 Valued Member
It depends who you ask.
Joel Jamieson fx recommend LISS training alot to athletes in fx MMA.
His recommendations are usually to train what you are lacking, and gives tests to do to determine what that is. The feeling I get from what he says is that a lot of MMA fighters focus or anaerobic training too much and not enough on aerobic training, so for those people he recommends a variety of aerobic protocols including but not exclusively LISS.
 

TedDK

Level 4 Valued Member
His recommendations are usually to train what you are lacking, and gives tests to do to determine what that is. The feeling I get from what he says is that a lot of MMA fighters focus or anaerobic training too much and not enough on aerobic training, so for those people he recommends a variety of aerobic protocols including but not exclusively LISS.
Off course not. But he recommend a base og LISS until your RHR are at a certain point fx and still a combination of HIIT and LISS after that.
 

Bauer

Level 7 Valued Member
There are great recommendations on step up training by @Derek Toshner; building on the step up article by Kenneth Bolyard.




Variability optionslightmediumheavy
Step ups per minute151923
Box heightB-20%B*B+20%
Rucksack weightR-20%RR+20%
*B = medium box height, 75% of bent knee height (see article)

Roll a die for each option before training.
When getting the same variation as in the session before, roll again.

I have also made a simple excel sheet for calculating this table and the HR-ranges.
 

Anders

Level 6 Valued Member
I was thinking a bit about what would be similar exercises for the other big muscles in the body.

Step -ups for the quads. (Aerobic/slow-twitch fiber training).
Kettlebell deadlift for the hamstring and the back.
Push-ups for the triceps, pecs and stomach.
Band rows for the biceps, erector spinae and lattismus dorsi.

What do people think of this ?
 

Hobbes

Level 6 Valued Member
I was thinking a bit about what would be similar exercises for the other big muscles in the body.

Step -ups for the quads. (Aerobic/slow-twitch fiber training).
Kettlebell deadlift for the hamstring and the back.
Push-ups for the triceps, pecs and stomach.
Band rows for the biceps, erector spinae and lattismus dorsi.

What do people think of this ?
Honestly my initial reaction is why? This is the classic bodyweight alternative to Pavel’s Simple & Sinister and is what I plan to do while on holidays. Consider:
A grind and a ballistic
Upper body and lower body covered
A pull and a push/squat

To your point - the lats, biceps and erectors are covered in the rollout - the latter 2 isometric, but covered. As are triceps and pecs.

I’d pick three warmup exercises to supplement range of motion - dands, baithaks and tables immediately come to min - and then go with rollouts and stepups. Finish with the 90/90, QL and hangs. Darned good travel routine.
 

Gary Wilson

Level 5 Valued Member
Ok so today i walked up a mountain, mount snowden in wales, thanks to the running and other things i do it was fairly easy but in the future id like to tackle harder ones.

How can i best use step ups to help with this?
Have there own day or replace my squat sets with step ups sets? i feel like just doing a few sets a couple times a week wont do alot?
Is going for say 20 to 30min keeping HR around MAF a acceptable way to train them?
 
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