Strength as a general adaptation versus specific adaptations

Kozushi

Level 7 Valued Member
Someone recently mentioned that strength is a general adaptation and Pavel wrote this too. This is interesting as I have thought of it more as a specific adaptation to exactly the exercises I am doing, but that this specific adaptation can apply to other movements to the degree which they are similar to the training I'm doing... but then this means that strength is indeed a general adaptation! :)

Of course what provoked this thinking is the fact that my shoulder is making me take a break from S&S, which is my strength-crutch, hahaha! So, by doing other stuff I wonder to what degree I'm maintaining my S&S.

As for judo, it seems any kind of strength gains translate into something useful for judo somewhere or other in the sport.
 

Alan Mackey

Level 6 Valued Member
Strength is somewhat specific. That's why you shouldn't try to replicate your sport's movements using an external load (it won't transfer correctly and you'll end up ruining your technique).

But it also is (by FAR) the most transferable adaptation there is. That's why achieving a double bodyweight deadlift will increase your pull ups and improve your gokyo no waza as well.

And, at the other side of the spectrum, conditioning is very, very, very specific. That's why a truly beast like Rich Froning wouldn't be able to last five minutes of sparring (or why Lance Armstrong's marathon time was mediocre).

The only other general adaptation I can think of is steady state cardio (running, biking, swimming, kettlebell sport, rowing...). It really enhances everything else on top of its own adaptation's benefits.
 

Bauer

Level 6 Valued Member
Here is a quote from Ozolin, quoted in Easy strength
Ozolin said:
GPP contains the idea of all around physical development. Which is why the qualities developed by GPP may be called general as they express the ability of the organism and its psychological sphere to perform any physical work more or less successfully. Hence general endurance, general strength, general joint mobility, general coordination, general psychological preparedness.
GPP is general but can be individual.

Mitochondria development (such as from Q&D and probably from S+S) and some hypertrophy can of course be applied to different domains.

Pavel adds:
Pavel in Easy Strength said:
The strength portion of GPP is called GSP: general strength preparation. For a young athlete, GSP exercises should meet the following requirements:

1. Safety. Remember: “Do no harm!”

2. Simplicity. The young-un’s attention span demands this.

3. Teaching basic movement skills. Squatting, hinging, bracing, crawling, jumping, falling, running, etc.

4. All-aroundness. A mix of static and dynamic loads, a mix of energy pathways, a mix of loading directions.

5. Strength carryover to as many applications as possible.
He goes on to list exercises that fit the bill like Planks, Swings or TGUs.

Makes you appreciate the simplicity and all-aroundness of S&S even more :)
 

Kozushi

Level 7 Valued Member
Strength is somewhat specific. That's why you shouldn't try to replicate your sport's movements using an external load (it won't transfer correctly and you'll end up ruining your technique).

But it also is (by FAR) the most transferable adaptation there is. That's why achieving a double bodyweight deadlift will increase your pull ups and improve your gokyo no waza as well.

And, at the other side of the spectrum, conditioning is very, very, very specific. That's why a truly beast like Rich Froning wouldn't be able to last five minutes of sparring (or why Lance Armstrong's marathon time was mediocre).

The only other general adaptation I can think of is steady state cardio (running, biking, swimming, kettlebell sport, rowing...). It really enhances everything else on top of its own adaptation's benefits.
AH! Strength is general but conditioning specific!!! That's the thing right there! I SEE!!! :)

I agree on the importance of the deadlift. In terms of bang for buck, that is the best exercise in existence. I can spend like 5 minutes a week or a few times a week and get a lot stronger with it. I think some kind of chinup bar moves and hangs are also fairly effective - just by holding the position you get a lot stronger and more conditioned for holding on to heavy stuff for a while. I've been using both these kind of moves (deadlift and chinup bar work) to improve my guard playing (this is when you're fighting from the bottom in judo or BJJ). I thinh now because the pushing movements don't have a grip-strength component, the chinup bar is to be preferred to the parallel bars.
 
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