Strong Grip + Powerful Hips = Athletic Base

xagunos

Level 5 Valued Member
As a former wrestler and someone who has engaged in various forms of training from bodyweight training, weight training, rock climbing and other sports and I am led to believe if someone has a strong grip and powerful hips, they have an advantage in pretty much every sport they go into minus something like distance swimming in which any significant muscle mass in general can be a disadvantage. This could be another reason why the KB swing is such an effective tool.

Anyone thoughts on this?
 

Antti

Level 8 Valued Member
The hips is where the movement begins, so yes.

But the generated power has to travel through the body, so we need strength all over.

I'm not sure how much grip strength plays into most sports.
 

Don Fairbanks

SFG II
Certified Instructor
As a former wrestler and someone who has engaged in various forms of training from bodyweight training, weight training, rock climbing and other sports and I am led to believe if someone has a strong grip and powerful hips, they have an advantage in pretty much every sport they go into minus something like distance swimming in which any significant muscle mass in general can be a disadvantage. This could be another reason why the KB swing is such an effective tool.

Anyone thoughts on this?
Agreed, and I've read somewhere that grip strength and hip/leg strength has a direct correlation to chance of mortality. Certainly a factor in maintaining independence in an aging population.
 

xagunos

Level 5 Valued Member
The hips is where the movement begins, so yes.

But the generated power has to travel through the body, so we need strength all over.

I'm not sure how much grip strength plays into most sports.
I agree we need strength all over and it’s important to note that all events of power typically start from the feet however the hip extension is where the overwhelming majority of the power is generated.

Grip I think from an irradiation and CNS firing perspective seem important. I remember arm wrestling baseball players and being surprised how strong there grip was from the amount of forearm and grip training they do.
 

offwidth

Level 9 Valued Member
As a former wrestler and someone who has engaged in various forms of training from bodyweight training, weight training, rock climbing and other sports and I am led to believe if someone has a strong grip and powerful hips, they have an advantage in pretty much every sport they go into minus something like distance swimming in which any significant muscle mass in general can be a disadvantage. This could be another reason why the KB swing is such an effective tool.

Anyone thoughts on this?
Significant muscle mass is also a detriment in climbing (usually), and grip strength is also over rated in climbing. (I say this as a long time climber and grip strength enthusiast)
 

xagunos

Level 5 Valued Member
Significant muscle mass is also a detriment in climbing (usually), and grip strength is also over rated in climbing. (I say this as a long time climber and grip strength enthusiast)
I agree grip is overrated for climbing once you have a general base of grip strength established as the sport is very technical. But the base of grip strength for climbers absolutely smokes the average person or even gym rat.
 

xagunos

Level 5 Valued Member
Agreed, and I've read somewhere that grip strength and hip/leg strength has a direct correlation to chance of mortality. Certainly a factor in maintaining independence in an aging population.
I’ve seen such studies myself.

One thing I would argue is that if you have strong hands, it’s likely you have a strong upper body but I am not sure if the inverse is as true.
 

Don Fairbanks

SFG II
Certified Instructor
I’ve seen such studies myself.

One thing I would argue is that if you strong hands, it’s likely you have a strong upper body but I am not sure if the inverse is as true.
Study referred to being able to grab something to arrest a fall when losing balance and the hips/legs for being comfortable going for a walk and other activities while being confident on your feet.
 

xagunos

Level 5 Valued Member
Study referred to being able to grab something to arrest a fall when losing balance and the hips/legs for being comfortable going for a walk and other activities while being confident on your feet.
Very true. And one physical trait not discussed in addition is overall power in the body for an elderly person to react on time. Pavel’s Q&D covers this.
 

offwidth

Level 9 Valued Member
I agree grip is overrated for climbing once you have a general base of grip strength established as the sport is very technical. But the base of grip strength for climbers absolutely smokes the average person or even gym rat.
Yep...
Footwork, other technique, head space, reading routes and sequences, efficient placing of pro, rope management skills, etc, etc, ... then get that grip as strong as heck... (but by then you have probably pretty decent grip anyways...)
 

xagunos

Level 5 Valued Member
Yep...
Footwork, other technique, head space, reading routes and sequences, efficient placing of pro, rope management skills, etc, etc, ... then get that grip as strong as heck... (but by then you have probably pretty decent grip anyways...)
100% agree the grip naturally comes as a by product from progressing technically.
 

Don Fairbanks

SFG II
Certified Instructor
Very true. And one physical trait not discussed in addition is overall power in the body for an elderly person to react on time. Pavel’s Q&D covers this.
Yes, and as far as your first post, grip/hip strength very important for American football. The hip part is obvious, grip comes in handy with pass rushers and others since offensive lineman and running backs have jerseys custom tailored to fit very tight as well as double stick tape on shoulder pads to keep you from grabbing them. D lineman or other D players as well, to keep from getting grabbed by O lineman.

And yes, you may notice that many of the larger fellas look like their billion dollar team could not afford to get them shoulder pads that fit. Nope. They wear tiny pads to feel light on their feet and to make it harder to be grabbed.
 
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Don Fairbanks

SFG II
Certified Instructor
Or just crack climb... forget about grip altogether, and learn to deal with pain... :cool:
Ah, offwidth cracks, the non Goldie locks width for being too wide and too small at the same time, the embrace the suck width. Full disclosure, I don't know jack about climbing, I know about embracing the suck, but not in a life or death way, just the fitness way.
 

Don Fairbanks

SFG II
Certified Instructor
Well... you certainly hit the nail on the head for the description of offwidth cracks... and at the same time cracked the double meaning of my forum handle... well done...!!!
Well Sir, I pay attention when I see someone with 12,748 solid posts with a reaction score of 44,213 that walks the talk. And Phx. has an excellent library system!
 

q.Hung

Level 6 Valued Member
In football/soccer, hip strength is important. Not so much with grip strength, but lats and triceps strength are quite necessary.
Beside of the hips, I think about neck strength.
 

SMalishev

Level 5 Valued Member
Well I don't know how easily a person could get a strong grip without also strengthening the upper body. Even just holding onto a weight, there's other muscles that also react to the load and hold tension.
 
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