Sumo Mobility

Steve Freides

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Staff member
Senior Certified Instructor
@guardian7, apply the same prying techniques you use in the goblet squat to your Cossack squat.
There are, of course, some other things one can do with the cossack that you can't do with a goblet squat - when/if you're ready to talk about some of them, holler (tag me) and we'll continue the conversation.

-S-
 

Geoff Chafe

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@Steve Freides Is Sumo Kettlebell Swing a thing?

I have been using it a little lately and it seems beneficial so far. I am mainly focusing on the top position and snapping the hips through. Not replicating my Sumo Deadlift.
 

Steve Freides

Forum Administrator
Staff member
Senior Certified Instructor
@Steve Freides Is Sumo Kettlebell Swing a thing?

I have been using it a little lately and it seems beneficial so far. I am mainly focusing on the top position and snapping the hips through. Not replicating my Sumo Deadlift.
@Geoff Chafe, usually a swing stance is compared to a narrow sumo stance (as opposed to the more usual, very wide sumo stance). If you mean a wider-than-usual swing stance, I haven't heard of it. We usually look for the stance that allows the maximum power, often asking people to try a few vertical jumps, with the "I'm loaded and ready to take off" position being a good place to start for a swing stance.

I couldn't give kinesiological/biomechanical reasons for why a wider stance wouldn't generally be recommended for swings, but as I tried it just now, it felt distinctly less powerful. Whether or not it might work as assistance for a sumo deadlift, I couldn't say.

@Brett Jones

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Chrisdavisjr

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I couldn't give kinesiological/biomechanical reasons for why a wider stance wouldn't generally be recommended for swings, but as I tried it just now, it felt distinctly less powerful.
I'm sure someone with a firmer grasp of biomechanical terminology could say this much better than I could, but it seems to me that, when compared to a narrower stance, the increased external rotation of the hip in a wider sumo stance limits the amount of force that can be applied by extension of the hip in the transverse plane.

That is, the hips have a shorter distance to travel forwards before reaching full extension, there's a shorter 'window of time' in which to create acceleration and force production is compromised. A successful swing requires horizontal displacement of the load - unlike a deadlift or barbell clean, wherein the weight is intended to travel straight upwards - so greater horizontal movement of the hip is desirable.

Hopefully someone who knows what they're talking about will either explain it better or tell me why I'm completely wrong.
 
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