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Kettlebell Sweat, dry fasting, and weight loss

Hey everyone! First post, I've been doing S&S for about 5 months and currently working to own 32kg.

One of my reasons for starting was to change my fate: the family heritage is all males get type 2 diabetes by 45. I just turned 30. In addition to changing my diet, moving to anti-glycolitic workouts and following Pavel's method, I do intermittent fasting and have lost considerable fat.

I found an article from a couple of Russian doctors that extol the virtues of "dry" fasting (no water) and naturally made me curious. Pop culture fitness says sweating isn't a measure of anything and stay peak hydrated at all times. I do know fighters will weight cut, then rehydrate but this is supposed "water weight" that is just regained.

My hypothesis is that sweat, hydration, and fasting are all linked to my desire to improve my body, despite what pop fitness tells me. Can anyone either confirm this or set me straight?
 

Eyetic

Level 5 Valued Member
My hypothesis is that sweat, hydration, and fasting are all linked to my desire to improve my body, despite what pop fitness tells me. Can anyone either confirm this or set me straight?
I don't understand really dry fasting, I do agree with some kind of fasting(16:8 or OMAD) and even tried some long 48 hrs fasts but dry fasting, specially when the body is almost 60% water and water itself is involved in so many different process inside the body, seems to me quite dangerous.

You are doing great and took the bull by the horns by keeping a healthy life-style all together (diet+training), there are many studies about fasting but not many on dry fasting (I remember some took place on the Ramadan month) and even then its not totally clear if any fast is good or bad on the long term (its very difficult to analyze a large population for a long period of time, some studies last months but who know what will happen after years!), what we do know is that being dehydrated is dangerous, we know how it generally feel, you can get use to it but its not great either.
 

John K

Level 7 Valued Member
Certified Instructor
Hey everyone! First post, I've been doing S&S for about 5 months and currently working to own 32kg.

One of my reasons for starting was to change my fate: the family heritage is all males get type 2 diabetes by 45. I just turned 30. In addition to changing my diet, moving to anti-glycolitic workouts and following Pavel's method, I do intermittent fasting and have lost considerable fat.

I found an article from a couple of Russian doctors that extol the virtues of "dry" fasting (no water) and naturally made me curious. Pop culture fitness says sweating isn't a measure of anything and stay peak hydrated at all times. I do know fighters will weight cut, then rehydrate but this is supposed "water weight" that is just regained.

My hypothesis is that sweat, hydration, and fasting are all linked to my desire to improve my body, despite what pop fitness tells me. Can anyone either confirm this or set me straight?
The US Army did a lot of research trying to get soldiers to acclimate to dehydration without effecting their performance ... it didn't work, they never acclimated. They realized it was a better idea to try and get them to stay hydrated so they could perform better.
 

Adachi

Level 6 Valued Member
Excess adipose tissue is the problem. Losing water weight doesn’t help, just makes you dehydrated.

There aren’t any long term health benefits to being dehydrated.
There is much speculation as to whether a dry fast is different or superior to other levels of restriction. For me, it saves me from potty breaks between plane flights on a layover.

I eat rather plentifully otherwise and supplement with fat to mitigate the hunger. In a planned manner to harvest the logistical upside.

The only other known benefit that I know of is fitness models who want their muscles to show better, restricting water so that they appear more ripped.
 

Gypsyplumber

Level 6 Valued Member
Hey everyone! First post, I've been doing S&S for about 5 months and currently working to own 32kg.

One of my reasons for starting was to change my fate: the family heritage is all males get type 2 diabetes by 45. I just turned 30. In addition to changing my diet, moving to anti-glycolitic workouts and following Pavel's method, I do intermittent fasting and have lost considerable fat.

I found an article from a couple of Russian doctors that extol the virtues of "dry" fasting (no water) and naturally made me curious. Pop culture fitness says sweating isn't a measure of anything and stay peak hydrated at all times. I do know fighters will weight cut, then rehydrate but this is supposed "water weight" that is just regained.

My hypothesis is that sweat, hydration, and fasting are all linked to my desire to improve my body, despite what pop fitness tells me. Can anyone either confirm this or set me straight?
There are certainly better ways to avoid type 2 diabetes other than dehydration. Fasting is absolutely a great way to help. Exercise is a critical piece of the puzzle. Many people who are already diabetic see great results on a ketogenic based diet, if it were me I’d lean that way but everyone’s body is different…Cutting out things like sodas is key.

I do a lot of fasting most days I do 16-20hour fasts other times I’ll go a few days and I think drinking salt water is important to maintain electrolytes without breaking the fast. Just curious, are you simply looking at this to drop weight?
 

watchnerd

Level 8 Valued Member
There is much speculation as to whether a dry fast is different or superior to other levels of restriction.

When it comes to fat loss, is there really?

Even (non-dry) intermittent fasting has been shown to be nothing special when normalized for caloric intake.

i.e. if you equalize calories, people who used time-restricted eating windows didn't exhibit superior fat loss to those who ate whenever

If we're talking anti-aging and autophagy, everything I've seen is related to caloric restriction, not dehydration.
 

Kev

Level 6 Valued Member
I think that there’s so much info out there some people need to put a new twist on dietary advice to sell it. I’d never dehydrate myself for some short lived weight loss. I did IF for ages there but the only thing that’s properly shifted the weight from me was putting a calorie app on my phone and using it meticulously to be in a calorie deficit. In truth I only ever really did 16:8 or OMAD because I don’t think it’s healthy or natural to be stuffed with food all day. The human body will still excrete waste after a 3 day fast and the gut can hold 20lbs of undigested matter. So for me it was a clean out.
 

BrianCF

Level 7 Valued Member
Congratulations on your prevention goals. My Dad died of it, it's nasty when you get older. Type 2 also RAVAGES the kidneys. You do not want to damage your kidneys by dry fasting. Let water wash the bad stuff out.

36-40 hour fasts once a week are fantastic, if you can sustain them.
 

watchnerd

Level 8 Valued Member
The US Army did a lot of research trying to get soldiers to acclimate to dehydration without effecting their performance ... it didn't work, they never acclimated. They realized it was a better idea to try and get them to stay hydrated so they could perform better.

This would indicate that dry fasting is probably actually *worse* for fat loss than "wet" fasting.

If exercise performance declines, fewer calories are likely to be burnt.
 

WxHerk

Level 7 Valued Member
I have done three 69~72 hour fasts. In hindsight, doing so without water would have been dangerous and I cannot see any extra benefit.

My only “tactical dehydration” was strapped for 9 hours in the backseat of an F-4 Phantom from Mississippi to Spain. From bedtime to briefing to takeoff, shut down was 24+ hours. I didn’t want to fumble through three layers of clothing to find my minuscule member and fill a rubber “piddle pack,” whilst perched atop an armed ejection seat so I purposefully drank nothing. I was a child of 27. Started my rehydration with an ice cold can of Budweiser after sliding off the wing. That can of Budweiser remains the very best beer I have ever had in my life.
 
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