Question Swings Transition post 24kg

BHS83

More than Five Posts
Hi all, first time poster.

In S&S 2.0 Pavel accepts some people might have trouble with 8kg jumps in the TGU (for men) and, if this is the case, they can use a 4kg jump and transition in 2 week phases instead of 4 so overall the journey takes the same amount of time.

Anyone have the opposite problem? I'm coming to the end of my training period with the 24kg as I really feel strong and consistent with in both swings and TGUs. However, I have had a go at 1H swinging a 32kg and cannot get it swinging with any height or power. Whereas with the TGU I can do a decent enough rep with a 32kg that I am happy to start using it.

I do own a 28kg and am happy to swing that and transition to additional sets every two weeks but I was just wondering if anyone else has found this, given the book assumes the issue will be with the TGU.
 

Bunn

Triple-Digit Post Count
This is a pretty common occurrence, several people have had their TGU accelerate faster than their swing. Nothing to worry about, just keep moving forward.
 

Tim Randolph

Triple-Digit Post Count
As @Bunn said it is normal to progress the two weights differently. You can start working the 32kg into your TGUs in a step-loading fashion. The timing recommendations is to add two sets every four weeks.

For swings, if you really think you are solid with the 24, I would go for the big jump. The 32kg can be a shock but the rewards are worth it. I started with it the week before Christmas and it was swinging me as much as the other way around. Having to do only two sets made it possible, and my body responded well to the clear signal to get stronger. I am now doing 8 sets with a lot of power and confidence. The 2.0 version of the book has a lot of discussion on big jumps and even doing split-sets if needed to get handle the heavier weight. Give that a try for a couple of weeks before assuming you have to use the 28.
 

Molson

Triple-Digit Post Count
As @Bunn

For swings, if you really think you are solid with the 24, I would go for the big jump. The 32kg can be a shock but the rewards are worth it. I started with it the week before Christmas and it was swinging me as much as the other way around. Having to do only two sets made it possible, and my body responded well to the clear signal to get stronger. I am now doing 8 sets with a lot of power and confidence. The 2.0 version of the book has a lot of discussion on big jumps and even doing split-sets if needed to get handle the heavier weight. Give that a try for a couple of weeks before assuming you have to use the 28.
Agree 100%. Although I guess @Pavel Macek recommends 4kg jumps in some cases?

I would say that you might end up using 28kg on some sessions for deloading or slight waviness, more speed. But only once you’ve made that leap of faith and can do a few sets with 32kg with confidence. It’s worth it.
 

Tim Randolph

Triple-Digit Post Count
Although I guess @Pavel Macek recommends 4kg jumps in some cases?
My understanding from S&S 2 is that the 4kg jumps (for men) are given as an option primarily for get ups and that the big jumps are strongly preferred for swings. If grip strength is an issue, split sets are the answer not a lighter weight. Get ups are a more technical move and the big jumps in the center of gravity throw some people off. This is why I have gone for the 4kg jumps in that lift.
 

Pavel Macek

> 3k Posts
Master Certified Instructor
One more from me. I think that the 8kg jump is a good measuring stick of if one had spent enough time on owning the previous weight. In both lifts.
If possible, I always prefer big jumps. Pavel has explained why on multiple occasions.
 

BHS83

More than Five Posts
As @Bunn said it is normal to progress the two weights differently. You can start working the 32kg into your TGUs in a step-loading fashion. The timing recommendations is to add two sets every four weeks.

For swings, if you really think you are solid with the 24, I would go for the big jump. The 32kg can be a shock but the rewards are worth it. I started with it the week before Christmas and it was swinging me as much as the other way around. Having to do only two sets made it possible, and my body responded well to the clear signal to get stronger. I am now doing 8 sets with a lot of power and confidence. The 2.0 version of the book has a lot of discussion on big jumps and even doing split-sets if needed to get handle the heavier weight. Give that a try for a couple of weeks before assuming you have to use the 28.
Thanks, you described my initial attempt at a 32kg swing to perfection! Nearly yanked me over backwards! I'll give it another try.
 

BHS83

More than Five Posts
Training update - first session working in the 32kg and it went..... fine! The swings were obviously not as perfect as with the 24kg but they were certainly serviceable and good enough as a baseline. TGUs were scarily easy. Guess putting strength in the bank with lighter weights really does work.
 

Steve Freides

Forum Administrator
Senior Certified Instructor
Elite Certified Instructor
@BHS83, welcome to the StrongFirst forum.

If you can, take your 32 outside and throw it. Begin a swing but throw the bell behind you. Begin a swing, perform the backswing, then throw the bell in front of you. A few reps like this are fun and can help you get over the mental hurdle of the higher weight.

Then do some work with shorter sets - swing your 32 for just a rep or two. Better if you do it outside again so that you know, if you lose your grip, nothing will be harmed. And let your swings be low, don't worry about the height. The key is for you to accumulate some volume with your 32 in any way you can, and this will help you get used to it.

-S-
 
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