Off-Topic tennis elbow.....?

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LukeV

Level 6 Valued Member
Regardless of the treatment approach, figure out what caused it and don't do that again or else you'll just get it straight back. I had bad elbow tendinitis for years and have posted here about it. You can search for my treatment. Good luck!
 

Kenny Croxdale

Level 6 Valued Member
sucks yes?

"Graston Technique"

A few years ago, I had Golfer's Elbow. It is the same as Tennis Elbow but on the opposite side of the arm.

A Dr. David Foster, a Sports Chiropractor, showed me how to use the "Graston Technique" at home. It cured my problem.

This treatment method is a bit painful but it works.

It cured my elbow problem in a little over a month.

Kenny Croxdale
 

SethRen

Level 4 Valued Member
Regardless of the treatment approach, figure out what caused it and don't do that again or else you'll just get it straight back. I had bad elbow tendinitis for years and have posted here about it. You can search for my treatment. Good luck!
I wish I could figure it out. I honestly don't know what's causing it.
 

Tails

Level 2 Valued Member
First post.

I've had golfers and tennis elbow and I've found heavy concentrics (lowering) helps loads. For this I lowered a weight with my hands rotating inwards. I used a weighted ice axe and I will explain all this but it's easier to tell you that a therabar works in the same way.
 

LukeV

Level 6 Valued Member
I wish I could figure it out. I honestly don't know what's causing it.

Herewith my post with some ideas:

I suffered from elbow tendinitis for years and after consulting with mountain climbers and gymnasts who are, in my experience, the tendinitis experts I got my problem under control.

1. Do not rest the joint but avoid any exercise that aggravates the injury. Experiment with changed exercises, range of motion, rep ranges, frequency, rest periods etc whatever it takes to keep exercising without pain. For example I stopped bench pressing and switched to floor press then board press, seated row changed ROM so elbows stopped at my sides rather than bar at my chest, changed v bar to wide bar, dropped weight to lift 15+ reps, stopped chin ups for a while then reintroduced with neutral grip and stopping with eyes level with the bar etc. Check wrist position throughout the course of the exercise to ensure the wrist stays straight and in line with the elbow and weight, use neutral grip wherever possible or reverse grip, exercises that cause the wrist to flex (such as using v bars or ez bar) or pull on an angle (such as seated row pulled to chest rather than stomach) greatly increase the load on the elbow tendons.
2. If pain occurs stop what you are doing immediately. Never try and exercise through the pain. Any aggravation sets back healing
3. Aggressive use of anti-inflammatories at any sign of pain. This includes higher than OTC recommended dosages. Talk to your doctor. Mine was relaxed about me doubling the daily dose of ibuprofen for a time
4. Massage of the forearm muscles and tendons. I just used to roll my forearms up and down on all angles using one of my fat gripz

Good luck!
 

SethRen

Level 4 Valued Member
Herewith my post with some ideas:

I suffered from elbow tendinitis for years and after consulting with mountain climbers and gymnasts who are, in my experience, the tendinitis experts I got my problem under control.

1. Do not rest the joint but avoid any exercise that aggravates the injury. Experiment with changed exercises, range of motion, rep ranges, frequency, rest periods etc whatever it takes to keep exercising without pain. For example I stopped bench pressing and switched to floor press then board press, seated row changed ROM so elbows stopped at my sides rather than bar at my chest, changed v bar to wide bar, dropped weight to lift 15+ reps, stopped chin ups for a while then reintroduced with neutral grip and stopping with eyes level with the bar etc. Check wrist position throughout the course of the exercise to ensure the wrist stays straight and in line with the elbow and weight, use neutral grip wherever possible or reverse grip, exercises that cause the wrist to flex (such as using v bars or ez bar) or pull on an angle (such as seated row pulled to chest rather than stomach) greatly increase the load on the elbow tendons.
2. If pain occurs stop what you are doing immediately. Never try and exercise through the pain. Any aggravation sets back healing
3. Aggressive use of anti-inflammatories at any sign of pain. This includes higher than OTC recommended dosages. Talk to your doctor. Mine was relaxed about me doubling the daily dose of ibuprofen for a time
4. Massage of the forearm muscles and tendons. I just used to roll my forearms up and down on all angles using one of my fat gripz

Good luck!
@Luke...good advice. I have implemented some of your suggestions already. I bough a bench block(benchblokz) to shorten the range of motion on bench and I actually bought an armaid to get the knots out of my forearms. Maybe it's just me getting old. 44 Next month. What's funny is that the only compound movement that doesn't bother it is deadlifts.
 

LukeV

Level 6 Valued Member
@Luke...good advice. I have implemented some of your suggestions already. I bough a bench block(benchblokz) to shorten the range of motion on bench and I actually bought an armaid to get the knots out of my forearms. Maybe it's just me getting old. 44 Next month. What's funny is that the only compound movement that doesn't bother it is deadlifts.

The only aggravation I had with deadlifts was when lifting heavy and fatigued my hands were slightly opening with the weight coming to rest on my fingers rather than in a clenched fist. That flared the tendinitis big time but by ensuring the fist stayed fully closed around the bar I solved that problem.
 

Masangkay

Level 2 Valued Member
Great advice @LukeV. I recently responded to a post in the BW forum related to pull ups and tennis elbow. To echo what I said there, in addition to your points about pain management, pain is an indication of weakness and/or poor technique.

It often is a muscle group's inability to hold the isometric needed to maintain optimum joint stability that manifests as pain through repeated bad reps. Poor stability = load distribution changes = technique suffers.

Cases in point: that one cannot fully lower the bar to chest during the bench or bring chest much higher above bar in a pull up are both indications limited shoulder internal rotation ROM. The body will compensate as the lift reaches end ROM by rolling the shoulders forward in both cases.

Certainly one can work around the weakness by cutting ROM but I really feel that's like "driving with your foot on the brake" so to speak. Barring really bad injuries, just about everyone possesses the capacity to achieve full ROM in all traditional barbell and BW lifts by addressing the right areas. That means benching to the chest, pull ups with neck to bar, overhead pressing in line with ears with strong posture, weighted dips to 90 degrees - all with zero pain. Same goes for lower body lifts.

First address pain. Then address WEAKNESS. Stability is a prerequisite of mobility. Stability requires strength. For the shoulder, that means lower traps and rhomboids, and if you wish to lift overhead (you do) serratus. The "down and back" shoulder position (aka "packed" position) is crucial in practically all upper body lifts, but few weekend warriors really master it. Without that position, your maximum potential in any upper body lift is lost.
 

tmpierce

Level 5 Valued Member
I had good luck curing Golfer's elbow with a set of exercises - you can find lots of articles on it now compared to a few years ago. Short version is using weights to conduct some wrist flexion/extension and rotation exercises. Start very light, go slow, combined with stretching of the wrist in the various planes of motion (there were some great posts awhile back- I think in the 'everything else' about podcasts discussing tendon/ligament healing- going slow is actually important to it working). Initially I was only using a dowel stick and not even holding it at the end. I still do the exercises periodically to help avoid recurrence (may or may not matter but the few minutes 1-2 a week is a cheap insurance even if it's not helping)
 
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