The Surprising Truth About Sugar

kennycro@@aol.com

Level 6 Valued Member
1) Does the body deplete muscle glycogen first, before it switches to using ketones?
Glycogen and Ketones

The percentage of muscle glycogen and ketones used is dependent on various factors; primarily diet and your training protocol.

The Ketogenic Diet

The Ketogenic Diet depletes glycogen in approximately 3 days and the body shift over to using ketones for energy.

Intermittent Fasting

Fasting increase the fat burning hormones (nor-ephedrine, ephedrine, glucagon, cortisol, etc). Research shows fat burning as well as you metabolism initially increase.

2) A keto-adapted person will have glycogen restored first via ketones?
Muscle Glycogen Restoration

Research shows that muscle glycogen level are restored to approximately the same as those on a Traditional Western Diet, once Keto Adapted. There a time element to it.

Muscle Glycogen Restoration occurs via gluconeogenesis. Protein and Glycerol from Triglycerides are converted to glucose and stored in the muscles.

Kenny Croxdale
 

ali

Level 7 Valued Member
Research shows that muscle glycogen level are restored to approximately the same as those on a Traditional Western Diet, once Keto Adapted.
This is the thing with keto - it is the saviour from the Traditional Western Diet, whatever that is. I think it is a diet of excess energy intake making people overweight, ridden with diabetes and all sorts of metabolic issues. Is this the definition?
Carbs get the blame for this, in steps keto, saving the day. It's a nice simple solution. When we all know it is excess energy of both carb and fat.The food products consumed on this traditional western diet are high in both fat and carb.
So what if you are not on this traditional western diet - that you eat good food in moderation and you are healthy?
Does the ketogenic diet save you from the excesses of too much fruit, veg and tubers? And in what way? And what exactly, precisely, are the metabolic pathways that differentiate it from a healthy diet of some protein, some carbs and fibre and some fats?
 

kennycro@@aol.com

Level 6 Valued Member
This is the thing with keto - it is the saviour from the Traditional Western Diet,
My post that you quoted, "Research shows that muscle glycogen level are restored to approximately the same as those on a Traditional Western Diet, once Keto Adapted", is in regard to what occurs with Keto Adaptation.

I am not sure how you came up your reply to that. There's nothing in my statement that even states, let alone hints the Ketogenic Diet is the savior to anything.

it is a diet of excess energy intake making people overweight, ridden with diabetes and all sorts of metabolic issues.
I've hammered that point home in many of my post; that one of the main issues is consuming too many calories, no matter what diet you consume.

Kenny Croxdale
 

ali

Level 7 Valued Member
I've hammered that point home in many of my post; that one of the main issues is consuming too many calories, no matter what diet you consume
Yes you do, thank you and noted. My view isn't directed at you, Kenny, more a general observation on the world of keto.
There is a theme however....that the keto world offers science to the conundrums of human physiology. And this theme is corrupted by those with a vested interest in health marketing and promotion.
I get it, everyone's at it, keto is not alone in this regard.
The result? Polarised views about food. I really don't understand why and how it happened.
 

kennycro@@aol.com

Level 6 Valued Member
Yes you do, thank you and noted. My view isn't directed at you, Kenny, more a general observation on the world of keto.
Agreed

As I have posted, I've been on Keto for over three years for a metabolic condition. It took me some time to understand and become acclimated to it and learn on to train on it.

I now enjoy the Keto Diet.

However, as you noted, there appears to be some misunderstanding and knowledge on the Ketogenic Diet.

I try, as you, to present dispel myths and misinformation and provide the facts.

Kenny Croxdale
 

ali

Level 7 Valued Member
A timely read today.....
A review of a book by Bill Bryson. I've read a lot of his books and his latest caught my eye....
To re-iterate, I've not actually read it, only a review of it...
The Body: A Guide for Occupants:

All about the mysteries within us all:

"He has waded through a PhD's worth of articles, interviewed physicians and biologists, read a library of books, and had a great deal of fun along the way......jokes factoids and biographical interludes."

the reviewer concludes:

"...the ultimate conclusions of his book could stand as an ultimate prescription for life: eat a little less, move a little more."

Amen.
 

Damiola

Level 2 Valued Member
Human body is a new theme for Bryson's writings. I am a bit weary of popular health writings in general, as it is easy to misinterpret research or fall into the confirmation bias. On the other hand, I am going to take a leap of faith and get the book, even if for Bryson's exceptional sense of humor.
 

nogibjjgear00

Level 4 Valued Member
Thanks for sharing. My favourite part:


Of course, as it says, it is not a health food and might cause problems with your teeth etc.
It's like this part was written on me. I keep on talking trash about sugar that it would cause this and that and yet i can't really seem to quit drinking soda.
 

wespom9

Level 6 Valued Member
Certified Instructor
I liked Bryson's book. It's an easy read that analyzes various systems in the body. It's not as "health hacking" or longevity focused as say "Lifespan" by David Sinclair, or "Spring Chicken" by Bill Gifford but it's a good read nonetheless and I learned quite a few things
 

William F

Level 4 Valued Member
i don't necessarily think that sugar is the enemy but more so the cascade of reactions in our body to said sugar
 

Don Fairbanks

SFG II
Certified Instructor
Millions of years of evolution where access to honey and tart tiny berries, crab apples ( sorry, no fist size Fuji apples and cotton candy grapes) and the like were only available seasonally or not at all. A person's ability to process sugar can very greatly. I believe a sign of this is the amount of body fat you carry and if you carry more than you'd like you probably do not process sugar well. I often repeat something I stole from Charles Poliquin, " A few of my athletes do very well on 70% carbs. Many I only allow to look at a calendar of cakes once a month." Pretty sure the 70% group were/are extremely active.

I believe it is a bad idea to consume processed sugars/grains/seed-vegetables oils in any amount, and these substances are frequently combined in the same Frankenstein concoctions. I have not seen anyone sit down to a nice bowl of table sugar. Maybe I have. Jeff Goldblum when he was transforming into a fly in the remake of The Fly.
 
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Anna C

Level 9 Valued Member
Elite Certified Instructor
everyone should atleast have some amount of it everyday for a smooth body fuctioning.
Everyone should have some sugar every day for "smooth body functioning"?

I think I'll have to disagree with that statement. Sugar is not needed for anything, to my knowledge.
 

Don Fairbanks

SFG II
Certified Instructor
Everyone should have some sugar every day for "smooth body functioning"?

I think I'll have to disagree with that statement. Sugar is not needed for anything, to my knowledge.
Agreed. Essential fatty acids and amino acids. No essential sugars/carbohydrates.
 

North Coast Miller

Level 7 Valued Member
A small amount of sugar mixed with other foods to slow digestion is not going to be any different than natural foods that are high in sugars. You wouldn't sit down and eat 15 bananas and a pound of grapes, don't eat equivalent amount of table sugar, you'll be fine.


Edit: before this conversation takes a turn, the only reason sugars/carbs are not "essential" is they can be manufactured from aminos. The body absolutely does need some to function unless you plan on getting by without your liver.
 

Don Fairbanks

SFG II
Certified Instructor
No non essential fats either, right?
There are some essential fatty acids ( alpha-linolenic acid and linoleic acid ) that your body needs for biological processes that it cannot synthesize on its own, so you must ingest them. Same goes for the nine, sometimes ten, essential amino acids.
 
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ali

Level 7 Valued Member
Yes. Essential dietary fats and essential amino acids.
Absolute agreement - our bodies cannot synthesize them.

So essential for what?

Another requirement for life: an essential energy source.

Energy is necessary for life. Without energy, we dead.

As carbon in the form of fatty acid and glucose is interchangeable, the making of one can be derived from the other, the source doesn't really matter.

So when carbs are said to be non essential, that's true but it's also true that non essential fatty acids are just that: non essential. In the absence of dietary fatty acids, glucose can provide the fat for physiological processes. And in the absence of glucose, fats can provide glucose when there is a physiological demand for it.

Did you know this: carbs can make fat?
I know, who'd have thought.

However, it is glucose and only glucose that can provide atp in certain cells. It is not dependent upon eating it, just as using fat for fuel is not dependent upon eating it, either.

Glucose is essential for life because carbon is essential for life.

If you do not eat any carbs at all and wonder why you are not dead, it's because your body is finding its glucose without you going out shopping for it.

So, EFAs and EEAs and carbohydrates are non essential.

If that statement is true then the following holds:

EFAs and EEAs and other fats are non essential.

...well it must be because they are the same source: carbon.

And carbon is essential.
 
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