Old Forum Training for GPP, and what is functional?

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HerrMannelig

Level 3 Valued Member
Isn't this a community which has doing 100 kettlebell snatches as a standard?

But, for the GPP question, it is an interesting concept. Valery Fedorenko (while I have the quote on hand) said:
....Why spend two minutes doing six repetitions when you can do one hundred? We are humans, and humans have to do repetitions all day. How many one-step repetitions does a baby do in a day, ten thousand? I would rather have someone do many jerks, push presses, or snatches in that time and see more benefit.
That quote has a context, but that is not as important as the positive statement about doing many reps for training.

Now, for me, I focus on strength and I consider doing 10 reps of anything to be "high" (even if the reps are not consecutive). If I can do 10 of something, I figure it is too easy and it is something I use for relaxation, a light session, or a warmup.

But I was not always like this, and I am starting to back off on it. I started by doing high reps calisthenics, greasing the groove (as people here could call it), and daily practice. My first fitness goal was 100 pushups. After reaching that (without any programming...I just went for it consistently), I did them for at time everyday. Every day, I would do 75-100 pushups consecutively.

Now, in terms of strength, that does very little. In terms of GPP, that kind of training may do a lot. The effect it has on the muscles, bones, joints, soft tissues, cardiovascular health, etc are more even. I have gone away from that kind of training, and am used to heavy lifting. For me, it is easier to lift 90% of my 1RM daily than it is for me to do a 10RM 5 times. I perceive higher volume as being a lot of work, whereas high tension is normal.

But in more recent times, I am considering going back to that kind of training, as my goals are less about increasing strength, and more about overall fitness.

And it is good for GPP, to move one's body for many reps. Working up to doing a lot of pullups, pushups, squats, etc would be very good GPP, even after one got up to 20 or more reps.

 
 

Lukas Luko

Level 2 Valued Member
I think this standart is just for certification, not every training, but maybe i am wrong :)

I love bodyweight training also, but in my opinion the best GPP is 2 weeks of PM and 2 weeks of PTTP. It has got enough strength and conditioning, needed for most. Sorry but in my opinion everyone should have some serious contact with weights. We can have beatiful and wonderful life, but life is just a life. Once day we can be rich and the other we can be poor. We can't let to be weak and we should be prepare for anything.
 

HerrMannelig

Level 3 Valued Member
I think this standart is just for certification, not every training, but maybe i am wrong
That is true, but to train for it, one must...train for it.
Sorry but in my opinion everyone should have some serious contact with weights.
People can get strong without them. People have gotten very strong using no weights, relatively light weights, and heavy weights.
We can’t let to be weak and we should be prepare for anything.
Good health is just the slowest way to die. No matter what, we are all on a death march towards weakness and death. Therefore, training should be for a good benefit. We cannot expect to prepare for anything, especially when we do not need to. We should focus on proximate occasions first, before remote ones.
 

apa

Level 6 Valued Member
In one of his books, Timothy Ferris talks about a 'minimum effective dose'. This basically means that you do the least possible work that still yields results. If one is simply looking for health and general conditioning, there is, in my humble opinion no better program than the 'Program minimum'.

The get up makes your shoulders feel awesome, your abs will have to contract hard and become stronger in order to stabilize your body. The swing will force your heart and lungs to work better, harder more efficiently, your hand/forearm strength will learn (the hard way) how to keep the weight in the air.

The swing will also help protect your back which is perhaps the biggest contributor to general health. I would also throw in some joint/mobility issues like those found in EtK and/or the trifecta from Convict Conditioning 2.
 

Jason Paul

Level 3 Valued Member
Thanks all. Although I've "officially" moved on to the ROP, I'm clearly questioning that decision. I've found that when I'm online, I keep looking for threads and information about the PM, as well as people's slight variations (such as adding goblet squats).

So, I'm seriously thinking about going back on the PM.

Another thing about the ROP is that my last workout took almost 45 minutes, and I haven't even worked up to a single 5-rung ladder yet. I can see these workouts getting close to an hour long.

Also, I may have some time to think about this anyway. I had a ladder-to-ground incident yesterday and hurt my ankle pretty badly. So, my training may be on hold for a while. Honestly, I'm pretty ticked off about it. I'm on my way to the doctor in about an hour.

Thanks,

Jason
 

Rickard

Level 4 Valued Member
Jason mate, I'm sorry to hear about your ankle, happend to me earlier this year. Real bad sprain. Feel your pain!

 

I think you should stay on the RoP. The PM is an awesome program, specially if you are doing other sports on the side. But it will still be there after you've hit your first RoP cycle.

 

I've always felt that for KBs that the PM is the bottom of the pyramid, the foundation. The RoP is the layers above. Do a RoP cycle every now and then when you have the time to commit to getting those long hard days in the end of the cycle.
 
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