Training Principles

Bro Mo

Level 6 Valued Member
Curious what everyone pulls from programs as core guiding principles or methods. I guess it could be like the answer you assume you would get if you asked Pavel a question. Sometimes I feel the advice I give to others is different than the advice I give to myself.

For my personal training I try to address:
  1. Adequate Intensity
    • 70-80%, primarily
    • 85-95%, alternatively
  2. Adequate Frequency
    • Minimum twice per week to be worth my time and recovery
  3. Managing Fatigue
    • Weekly intensity number of lifts
    • H, M, L undulation by day, week, set, etc.
  4. Specificity
    • Minimize number of objectives. If I want to run faster, run faster. If I want to lift heavier things, lift heavier things. To press more, you have to press more.
 

guardian7

Level 6 Valued Member
Curious what everyone pulls from programs as core guiding principles or methods. I guess it could be like the answer you assume you would get if you asked Pavel a question. Sometimes I feel the advice I give to others is different than the advice I give to myself.

For my personal training I try to address:
  1. Adequate Intensity
    • 70-80%, primarily
    • 85-95%, alternatively
  2. Adequate Frequency
    • Minimum twice per week to be worth my time and recovery
  3. Managing Fatigue
    • Weekly intensity number of lifts
    • H, M, L undulation by day, week, set, etc.
  4. Specificity
    • Minimize number of objectives. If I want to run faster, run faster. If I want to lift heavier things, lift heavier things. To press more, you have to press more.

1. BALANCE. Balance of human movement patterns: push, pull, etc. there are various list by Dan John and others. Don't forget rotate or circular patterns (mace, halo). Include stuff on the ground, getups, elevated rolls etc.
2. SPEED. Focus on bar speed or fast concentric and slow and controlled eccentric for most lifts and bodyweight over rep volume.
3. DENSITY. Include both density and distribution of reps (i.e. GTG or multiple short workouts, Geoff Neuport).
 

Antti

Level 9 Valued Member
Consistency and effort are the two big principles.

If I don't train hard enough, what is there to adapt to?

If I don't train consistently, I can't expect consistent progress.

Typically, I find I like heavier weights more.

Spreading the workload across multiple sessions makes it far easier to ramp up significant amounts of volume.

I like lifting to be fun.
 

offwidth

Level 9 Valued Member
I suppose for the most part I follow some of the old Gym Jones principles; specifically...
  • The mind is primary
  • Training is preparation for the real thing
 

pet'

Level 8 Valued Member
Hello,

I always look for :
- sustainability
- well-rounded (strength, endurance...)
- keep things simple and stick to the basics and follow (with reason) examples
- something I like

Kind regards,

Pet'
 

WhatWouldHulkDo

Level 6 Valued Member
How does it drive progress (i.e. how does it get hard/heavy), how does it allow for recovery, and how does it accommodate other training (no one program does everything)
 

q.Hung

Level 6 Valued Member
- Big focus on one thing at the time, usually as one lift.
- Do other lifts/ex.ercises if i feel necessary.
- Do no harm - for both for myself and for others.

Last one is the most important. If i hurt myself, my work gets affected. If i had a bad technique lift, people around me would look at it as an example.
 

watchnerd

Level 5 Valued Member
Curious what everyone pulls from programs as core guiding principles or methods.
Well....

Guiding principles for what outcome?

The qualities I look to create in an off-season program, a pre-competition GPP prep, competition prep, and recovery/de-load are all different.

I might be using 3x a week HLM right now, but when I get 12 weeks from competition, I'll be doing something completely different.

What I do after peaking at competition for de-load will be different from my off-season.

All programs are just tools to drive a particular kind of adaptation.

The kind of adaptation I want changes according to the season.
 

Coyotl

Level 6 Valued Member
Off the top I'd say I'd sum most into two things:
1. Sustainable.
2. Progressive.

Sustainable covers things like health, injury risk, enjoyability, desires and goals, as well as also being "enough" without the "toos" (little and much).

Progressive ... well that includes three things really:
1. Progressive increase in resistance (goal is to get more capable)
2. Progressive increase in difficulty (e.g. complexity of an exercise, simple movements before complex; if you can't squat why would I have you try and do a full snatch?)
3. Progressive changes in programming (what is appropriate for a new person to training may be different than someone who has been training intelligently for a decade)

Thanks for the prompt, it was fun thinking about this.
 

Anna C

Level 9 Valued Member
Elite Certified Instructor
Train for health, then performance.
Don't hurt yourself, but don't think you're fragile either. The body recovers and heals from most things.
Mind and body work together. "You and me against the problem" (the weight or training task). Not mind over body.
Enjoy the process. Monitor mood; if it's bad, more recovery is likely needed.
Enter a competition occasionally.
Pay attention; focus during training. Seek mastery.
Reject dogma... but study it carefully.
Seek evidenced-based training, approaches, treatments, and strategies.
Change things up from time to time. Periodization either by plan or by following new interests.
Get coaching or instruction. It's well worth it. Invest in yourself.
 

godjira1

Level 5 Valued Member
+1 to this. Some of these are gold.
Train for health, then performance.
Don't hurt yourself, but don't think you're fragile either. The body recovers and heals from most things.
Mind and body work together. "You and me against the problem" (the weight or training task). Not mind over body.
Enjoy the process. Monitor mood; if it's bad, more recovery is likely needed.
Enter a competition occasionally.
Pay attention; focus during training. Seek mastery.
Reject dogma... but study it carefully.
Seek evidenced-based training, approaches, treatments, and strategies.
Change things up from time to time. Periodization either by plan or by following new interests.
Get coaching or instruction. It's well worth it. Invest in yourself.
 

watchnerd

Level 5 Valued Member
Monitor mood
Oh, this is an interesting point for me...

Now that I'm 50, I don't train, ever, at chest beating / get psyched up / adrenaline levels of intensity.

I only do that in competition now.

5 years ago, I would try to kill myself at least once a week in training, leave myself broken and crawling, be unable to go up stairs for half a week, etc. Not anymore.

Train with a calm mind and quiet focus.
 

Steve Freides

Staff
Senior Certified Instructor
Elite Certified Instructor
Move many ways; load only a few.

Train as often as possible, as hard as possible, while remaining as fresh as possible.

-S-
 
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