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Other/Mixed Training strength increases power to a point.... but to what point?

Other strength modalities (e.g., Clubs), mixed strength modalities (e.g., combined kettlebell and barbell), other goals (flexibility)

Dayz

Level 7 Valued Member
Hi all,
Just pondering this. I've read a fair few places that increasing strength also increases power. E.g. squats and deadlifts improving jumps.

But beyond a certain point, there's diminishing returns and you'll need to include specific power training (e.g. plyos, ballistics, jumps, etc)

Question is, how do you know when you're at that point to incorporate those?

And what sort of dose (volume/ frequency) would be required?
 

pet'

Level 8 Valued Member
Hello,

I'd say that as long as you progress to your specific move (eg jumps) without increasing the amount of strength training, you can keep doing only strength training. At some point though, you'll will not progress anymore at your specific move, while maintaining the same amount of strength training. From there, you'll have two options: increasing a little the amount of strength training to see if there is also an increase in your specific move, or including specific power training.

Up to a certain point, even specific training may stall, meaning that you'll have to put more and more effort into a specific training modality to get only "slight" increase a specific ability (as you mentioned, there is a diminishing return).

Dose wise, I guess it would depend on your training mileage. If you are completely new, even a very modest dose will get you far. If you are more experienced, you'll have to put more effort into it,.

Kind regards,

Pet'
 

North Coast Miller

Level 8 Valued Member
For many people (athletes who are not carrying a lot of mass), jumps, sprints, plyo will increase squat and DL loading more than the inverse, and power will increase as well.
 

pet'

Level 8 Valued Member
Hello,

+1 @North Coast Miller
I have experienced it myself performing a lot of HS Burpees. It increases my DL and overall leg power.

I guess that's also the purpose of the article below, based on 2 explosive moves:

Kind regards,

Pet'
 

Antti

Level 9 Valued Member
It depends on the load of the implement of choice when demonstrating power.

To a reasonable point the absolute strength continues to increase power, however, there comes a time when it isn't sensible cost wise to try to develop it more. I'm not sure if there are any real metrics for it.
 

Adachi

Level 6 Valued Member
@Dayz

This thread from @Kenny Croxdale had a lot of great info that I think might be helpful, to review.

 

jayjo

Level 5 Valued Member
If you want to do something, you should train for that thing. Kettlebell training is supposed to be good for both power and stamina. And I would thing that powerlifting or bodybuilding would make one stronger but would not train one to move quickly. I've spent years doing bodybuilding and powerlifting workouts. But moving ballistically is very different and more athletic.
 

Dayz

Level 7 Valued Member
@Dayz

This thread from @Kenny Croxdale had a lot of great info that I think might be helpful, to review.

Thank you - this one was really helpful!
 

John K

Level 7 Valued Member
Certified Instructor
Hi all,
Just pondering this. I've read a fair few places that increasing strength also increases power. E.g. squats and deadlifts improving jumps.

But beyond a certain point, there's diminishing returns and you'll need to include specific power training (e.g. plyos, ballistics, jumps, etc)

Question is, how do you know when you're at that point to incorporate those?

And what sort of dose (volume/ frequency) would be required?
I don't think you're ever too early to incorporate power training, but the type of power training might vary depending on your age and skill level. @Brett Jones and @Mikeperry recently just did what sounds like a Part 1 on Power Training:


https://www.skillofstrength.com/power-development-episode-42/
 
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