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Kettlebell Training with a cold

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Gaz

Level 4 Valued Member
Typical, I’ve endured the wet, cold UK weather for months and just as we come out of an unseasonably cold Spring and get some nice warm weather I have come down with a cold. So, to train or not to train? That is the question. All opinions will be appreciated.
 

simon0596

Level 5 Valued Member
If you just have the sniffles or similar, then that’s fine. I wouldn’t push, but you can do enough to maintain. If you have a fever or feel systemically unwell, then skip it. Tomorrow’s another day
 

ShawnM

Level 8 Valued Member
Don’t kill yourself training but try and get a little in. I always feel better after a nice, long walk wether I’m fighting something off or not. The endorphins will do you good. Just don’t go nuts.
 

offwidth

Level 9 Valued Member
How important is your training...?
'They' say that if it is above your shoulders (i.e. A head cold) then light training is usually okay. If it's below your shoulders, and you have aches and pains, chills, congested lungs... then don't train.
 

Bret S.

Level 7 Valued Member
Certified Instructor
I had a nasty flu while prepping for SFG, just as I was really hitting my training stride it struck. Caught it from my girl while taking care of her. First flu I've had in many years.

SFG was Mar 2nd this year and this was 4 weeks before it. I did nothing for a week then did lighter sessions. I had strength still but my strength endurance was gone.

I was desperate to recover as quickly as possible and was reminded this strain was killing people when I expressed how bummed out I was. In the end I just listened to my body and kept up strength and did what I could to stay in the game. I actually ran a successful snatch test 2 weeks after symptoms started, to say it sucked is probably the under statement of the year. I had to do it though, to know it was still there.

I'd say good call on taking it easy and listening to your body, although I get the frustration..
 

Kozushi

Level 7 Valued Member
Having a bunch of snot slipping down the back of your throat can be very annoying but it doesn't necessarily mean you're very sick. Best to see a doctor. If it's just post-nasal drip and nothing else I've trained through it. If it's infected throat, ears or worse, LUNGS, don't train!!! Well, I admit to doing a minimal workout even when a bit ill, like a few kettlebell presses or chinups or whatever, but when feeling quite ill, do not train.
 

Kozushi

Level 7 Valued Member
I had a nasty flu while prepping for SFG, just as I was really hitting my training stride it struck. Caught it from my girl while taking care of her. First flu I've had in many years.

SFG was Mar 2nd this year and this was 4 weeks before it. I did nothing for a week then did lighter sessions. I had strength still but my strength endurance was gone.

I was desperate to recover as quickly as possible and was reminded this strain was killing people when I expressed how bummed out I was. In the end I just listened to my body and kept up strength and did what I could to stay in the game. I actually ran a successful snatch test 2 weeks after symptoms started, to say it sucked is probably the under statement of the year. I had to do it though, to know it was still there.

I'd say good call on taking it easy and listening to your body, although I get the frustration..

At 40 snatches I'm done. Anyone passing that test is definitely a guru.
 

pgomez

Level 6 Valued Member
if it is above your shoulders (i.e. A head cold) then light training is usually okay. If it's below your shoulders, and you have aches and pains, chills, congested lungs... then don't train.
+1

Typically, if I can think straight, I will train when ill. However, I always take extra long rest periods.

Also, I don't know about anyone else, but I find that when I have a cold, taking zinc supplements helps me a lot.
 

offwidth

Level 9 Valued Member
I too am a big fan of zinc. However for me I find them to be most effective if I take them when I am just starting to get a cold...
 

Ryan T

Level 6 Valued Member
Certified Instructor
No training. Your body is fighting against something. Give it a chance to do so by resting. Come back with full strength when your body says so and not your mind.

I completely agree. Seems like a good lesson in patience and listening to your body. I think for me, it would slow my recovery rates/progress in both getting through the cold and continuing training. I've ignored the warning signs from my body before and pushed it into oblivion which resulted in injuries, poor sleep, anxiety... I've read somewhere on the interweb that "under-recovering" (actual overtraining is rare), compromises your immune system as well.
 

North Coast Miller

Level 8 Valued Member
I find training to help a head cold, sometimes making me feel a lot better. This especially so if I train hard when I first feel it coming on.

No exercise other than walking if its in my chest.
 
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