Uneven shoulders

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anthony wustefeld

Level 4 Valued Member
Hey guys

I've noticed a big difference in both my shoulders flexibility and positioning.

My right shoulder has some internal rotation, is pushed forward a bit and stands a little higher than my left.
I can really feel the difference in both shoulders when doing pressing movements.

I've looked for a picture online to describe the look (BTW in my case it's the right shoulder that's pulled forward and upwards, just couldn't find a decent one online)



What are some solutions you guys can think of to remedy the situation ? I feel this is really hindering my pressing progression and even some pulling movements.

I think this is what caused my golfer's elbow when doing pullups a while back.

Thanks in advance.
 

rickyw

Level 6 Valued Member
Uneven shoulders is really common. Almost everyone has one shoulder higher than the other because we use one arm more than the other and we posture to enable better usage of our dominant arm.

I'm assuming the right shoulder is the one that struggles more?
Pulled forward and internally rotated, some or all of the above may be contributing: pec minor, pec major, lat, teres major, subscapularis
Elevated, essentially: upper trapezius and/or levator scapula.
Quality soft tissue work and mobility work can help with these issues.
You can use a t bar for subscapularis. Kneeling lat stretch works works great-Pavel Macek has a rendition that I saw on his blog that I really liked with a kettlebell involved. There are all sorts of pec stretches out there. I like shoulder dislocations.
Upper trapezius and levator scapula can be stretched, but I am not a fan of stretches for those as they torque the neck, plus they seem to respond better to soft tissue work anyway.
There is no substitute for a good pair of hands working on your muscles.

If you're having pain and not just struggling with your press then yes see a doctor.
 
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anthony wustefeld

Level 4 Valued Member
Thanks for the answers.

I'm gonna make an appointment with a physiotherapist as soon as possible and will keep you guys updated.
I really need to fix this issue just to make sure I can safely progress in my training.

How long does it generally take to correct your imbalances, what timeframe am I looking at ?
 

rickyw

Level 6 Valued Member
How long does it generally take to correct your imbalances, what timeframe am I looking at ?
The real answer: it all depends on the severity of the imbalance, the proficiency of the clinician, and the diligence of the patient in doing what they are asked.

The cookie cutter answer: 6 weeks give or take
 
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