all posts post new thread

Old Forum Vitamins and Health: attention pill-poppers!

Status
Closed Thread. (Continue Discussion of This Topic by Starting a New Thread.)

rambodoc@gmail.com

Level 3 Valued Member
Multivitamins in the Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease in Men. The Physicians' Health Study II Randomized Controlled Trial

Howard D. Sesso, ScD, MPH; William G. Christen, ScD; Vadim Bubes, PhD; Joanne P. Smith, BA; Jean MacFadyen, BA; Miriam Schvartz, MD; JoAnn E. Manson, MD, DrPH; Robert J. Glynn, ScD; Julie E. Buring, ScD; J. Michael Gaziano, MD, MPH

JAMA. 2012;308(17):1751-1760. doi:10.1001/jama.2012.14805.n November 7, 2012

 

Context  Although multivitamins are used to prevent vitamin and mineral deficiency, there is a perception that multivitamins may prevent cardiovascular disease (CVD). Observational studies have shown inconsistent associations between regular multivitamin use and CVD, with no long-term clinical trials of multivitamin use.

Objective  To determine whether long-term multivitamin supplementation decreases the risk of major cardiovascular events among men.

Design, Setting, and Participants  The Physicians' Health Study II, a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of a common daily multivitamin, began in 1997 with continued treatment and follow-up through June 1, 2011. A total of 14 641 male US physicians initially aged 50 years or older (mean, 64.3 [SD, 9.2] years), including 754 men with a history of CVD at randomization, were enrolled.

Intervention  Daily multivitamin or placebo.

Main Outcome Measures  Composite end point of major cardiovascular events, including nonfatal myocardial infarction (MI), nonfatal stroke, and CVD mortality. Secondary outcomes included MI and stroke individually.

Results  During a median follow-up of 11.2 (interquartile range, 10.7-13.3) years, there were 1732 confirmed major cardiovascular events. Compared with placebo, there was no significant effect of a daily multivitamin on major cardiovascular events (11.0 and 10.8 events per 1000 person-years for multivitamin vs placebo, respectively; hazard ratio
, 1.01; 95% CI, 0.91-1.10; P = .91). Further, a daily multivitamin had no effect on total MI (3.9 and 4.2 events per 1000 person-years; HR, 0.93; 95% CI, 0.80-1.09; P = .39), total stroke (4.1 and 3.9 events per 1000 person-years; HR, 1.06; 95% CI, 0.91-1.23; P = .48), or CVD mortality (5.0 and 5.1 events per 1000 person-years; HR, 0.95; 95% CI, 0.83-1.09; P = .47). A daily multivitamin was also not significantly associated with total mortality (HR, 0.94; 95% CI, 0.88-1.02; P = .13). The effect of a daily multivitamin on major cardiovascular events did not differ between men with or without a baseline history of CVD (P = .62 for interaction).

Conclusion  Among this population of US male physicians, taking a daily multivitamin did not reduce major cardiovascular events, MI, stroke, and CVD mortality after more than a decade of treatment and follow-up.
 

rambodoc@gmail.com

Level 3 Valued Member
Basically reinforces the futility of popping vitamins to get better in health and strength. You don't 'get' better, you may just 'feel' better and stronger. AKA placebo effect.
 

Physical Culture

Level 6 Valued Member
Rambo,

  Thanks for posting.  "Among this population of US male physicians, taking a daily multivitamin did not reduce major cardiovascular events, MI, stroke, and CVD mortality after more than a decade of treatment and follow-up.<!-- .bbp-reply-content -->"  I'm not a medical doctor, but are there not other aspects of health and wellness than those mentioned here?  Vitamins won't prevent a stroke or heart attack, but can they provide other benefits?
 
Status
Closed Thread. (Continue Discussion of This Topic by Starting a New Thread.)
Top Bottom