Warrior diet for powerlifters?

Sunil Nair

Level 1 Valued Member
Alright, folks... I've scoured the internet and besides Ori Hofmelker's books, the SF forum seems to be the next best resources for WD-related questions. Most importantly, I'm hoping to get some specific advice since most of us are strength athletes.

My primary focus is Powerlifting and I have been struggling with weight management though I can lose and gain weight at will. Just that I think I need the right template. So far, WD seems to be the best strategy but I'm apprehensive of sabotaging gains that I've had so far (in relation to my progress in each of the lifts). Reason: following a WD even for a couple of days makes me feel lighter (and somewhat weaker and less stronger, though that just might be mental) and the weights all of a sudden gets heavier.

I'm at the end of my 12-week cycle for all the lifts and thought of introducing WD now so that I could build up my strength as I progress with my diet for the days to come. And while I'm at it, I was wondering if there's anything specific you can recommend while following the WD.

I lift early mornings and usually have 30g of carbs with BCAAs with caffeine as my pre-workout. A recovery meal post workout. And then a couple of scoops of whey every three to four hours (400g of yogurt for lunch, without fail ;-)) until my big feast.

Any other (better) recommendations?

My focus is to build my lifts up while losing some fat (as I'm hovering around 20% body fat, which isn't healthy. Aiming for a 14-15% mark) without going crazy with what I eat and what I don't (though I track everything I eat judiciously, haven't missed a day in the past 18 months)!

Thank you folks!
 

Steve Freides

Staff
Senior Certified Instructor
Elite Certified Instructor
I recommend you transition to the WD gradually, and have one or two or even three cheat days per week while you're getting used to it. Whey every 3-4 hours isn't what I'd call the WD, although if it's undereating for you, then maybe .

-S-
 

Jak Nieuwenhuis

Level 6 Valued Member
I think you may want to embrace hunger just a little more, rather than eating (whey) at regular intervals

would not suggest carbs of any kind before your big feast. it will make you very hungry. just my personal experience, but it happens every time. of course items like blueberries and salads / greens are usually OK. any other kind of carb though, will spike my hunger 100% of the time

maybe try

BCAA + coffee (preworkout)

1 serving of whey (postworkout)

non-sweetened yogurt (lunch)

then big feast at night.

in practice, the WD is more about keeping your digestive system from working (dealing with more food!) during the "undereating" portion. expect and plan for improved digestion.

that, for me, is where the enhanced energy lies, when I can focus on flushing my body out during the morning & afternoon
 

HUNTER1313

Level 6 Valued Member
Whey during the day isn't exactly fasting. But Ori said it was good. Personally I have two to three mixed in water during the day and i can feel and it might sound like b.s. but I'm pretty sure I can see the difference.
 

ShawnM

Level 8 Valued Member
Read up on Protein Pulsing Modified Fasts, a popular one is The Apex Predator Diet. I'm jumping on that starting next Monday. I've done something similar without issues. Dropped fat and managed to gain strength, just at a slower rate.
 

HUNTER1313

Level 6 Valued Member
It sounds like a hybrid of T nations pulse fast and pulse feast with shades of the anabolic diet
 

Sunil Nair

Level 1 Valued Member
I recommend you transition to the WD gradually, and have one or two or even three cheat days per week while you're getting used to it. Whey every 3-4 hours isn't what I'd call the WD, although if it's undereating for you, then maybe .

-S-
Agree with you, Steve. I usually have a "recovery meal" post workout with whey... and then my lunch (Yogurt) and then a couple of scoops of whey after my kettlebell training in the evening (which honestly is on and off due to my hectic schedule) before my feast. The 3-4 hours' interval for whey was an idea... that I never seem to follow myself! (Damn!)
 

Sunil Nair

Level 1 Valued Member
Read up on Protein Pulsing Modified Fasts, a popular one is The Apex Predator Diet. I'm jumping on that starting next Monday. I've done something similar without issues. Dropped fat and managed to gain strength, just at a slower rate.
Wow! This is new. Will check it out, Shawn! Thanks!
 

Sunil Nair

Level 1 Valued Member
One of my concerns surely is that the feast just may get calorifically rich... making me overshoot my macros... but I'm not sure if that's something to worry about. Or is it? Since fat loss is the main goal here...
 

Jak Nieuwenhuis

Level 6 Valued Member
One of my concerns surely is that the feast just may get calorifically rich... making me overshoot my macros... but I'm not sure if that's something to worry about. Or is it? Since fat loss is the main goal here...
I don't mean to sound snide, but I would re-read The Warrior Diet. It makes a lot more sense when you have gone over it a few times.

Another really good book is "Fast Diets for Dummies"
 

Sunil Nair

Level 1 Valued Member
I don't mean to sound snide, but I would re-read The Warrior Diet. It makes a lot more sense when you have gone over it a few times.

Another really good book is "Fast Diets for Dummies"
Thanks, Jak! I actually did re-read the book but I wanted a different perspective from our fraternity here... since Ori's focus wasn't powerlifting but health and wellness in general. I hope I'm making sense. That said, I wouldn't mind going over the stack of notes this weekend ;-)
 

ShawnM

Level 8 Valued Member
No matter what life style plan you decide to adopt you can easily watch the calories. If you adopt more of a low carb/keto approach and cut out carbs theres a lot of calories you can omit and not have to sweat the calorie count.
 

kennycro@@aol.com

Level 6 Valued Member
I lift early mornings and usually have 30g of carbs with BCAAs with caffeine as my pre-workout.
Pre Workout

Consuming carbohydrates and BCAA's early in the morning before workout isn't necessary. You have more than enough muscle glycogen for your training session from your previous days meals.

That because virtually no muscle glucose is used during sleep.

Shutting Down The Fat Burning Process

Ingesting glucose and BCAA's (Leucine triggers insulin release) increase Insulin Production. An increase in Insulin shut down the fat burning process.

Nor-epinephrine, Epinephrine, Glucagon, Cortisol, and Growth Hormone

These are the body's "Fat Burners". They are suppressed when Insulin is elevated, via carbohydrates, with the Branch Chain Amino Acid, Leucine and proteins.

Acute (short term) elevation of these "Fat Burners" during exercise allow the body to access and use a greater percentage of body fat.

Caffeine

This is a good pre work out supplement.

A recovery meal post workout.
Post Workout Meal

Research (Dr Brad Schoenfield) consuming something immediately after a workout isn't necessary. Having something a few hours later is just as effective.

And then a couple of scoops of whey every three to four hours
Refractory Protein Period

One of the keys to increasing muscle mass is Muscle Protein Synthesis. Optimization of Muscle Protein Synthesis ensures better recovery and muscle growth.

Research (Dr Layne Norton, Nutrition/Bodybuilder/Powerlifter) determined that Muscle Protein Synthesis is optimizes when protein is ingested every 4 - 6 hours, rather that the dogma regarding eating every three hour.

Your muscle are somewhat like a sponge. When Soaked with water (protein in this case), the Sponge is unable to absorb any more water (in this case protein),

Once the sponge dries out, it is able to absorb more water (process, trigger muscle growth and recovery in this case).

With that said, another piece of dogma that is incorrect is about...

Multiple Meals

The belief that consuming multiple meals/snacks during the day increasing your metabolism is incorrect and counter productive.

Research (Dr John Berardi, etc) in the International Society of Sports Nutrition found multiple meals/snacks during the day restricted fat burning. That due to the fact that Insulin levels were continuously being elevated; block the "Fat Burners", (Nor-epinephrine, Epinephrine, Glucagon, Cortisol, and Growth Hormone).

Longer intervals between eating between means prompted more fat burning.

mTOR, The Anabolic Trigger

Research shows that mTOR (Mammalian Target of Rapamycin) is the anabobolic trigger for muscle growth.

Leucine (one of the BCAAs) turns on mTOR.

Approximately, 2.5 to 4.5 gram of Leucine are require to trigger mTOR.

Younger individual can elicit the effect with about 2.5 gram of Leucine.

Older individual need 3 gram plus of Leucine.

Thus, that amount of protein that you consume in a meal is a vital component for increasing muscle mass.

Leucine Percentages In Protein

Different protein, contain different percentages of Leucine.

1) Whey Protein: 10 - 12% Leucine. 25 gram of Whey = Up to 3 gram of Leucine.

2) Meats, Milk, Cheeses, Caseinate Protein: Approximately: 8% Leucine. 25 grams hese protein yield around 2 grams of Leucine.

3) The majority of Vegan Proteins are low in Leucine.

Pulse Feeding

1) Older Individuals: Plus Feeding is an effective method for older individual to maintain and/or increase muscle mass.

Pulse Feeding means older individual consume a much larger protein intake at meals. That ensures older individuals obtain enough protein/Leucine to trip the mTOR anabolic hormonal switch for muscle growth.

2) Younger Individuals: Pulse Feeding has no effective for increasing muscle mass. That because their system efficiently use lower level of Leucine. So, more for this group, Pulse Feeding isn't beneficial.

I think you may want to embrace hunger just a little more...
Good point.

Kenny Croxdale
 

Sunil Nair

Level 1 Valued Member
Pre Workout

Consuming carbohydrates and BCAA's early in the morning before workout isn't necessary. You have more than enough muscle glycogen for your training session from your previous days meals.

That because virtually no muscle glucose is used during sleep.

Shutting Down The Fat Burning Process

Ingesting glucose and BCAA's (Leucine triggers insulin release) increase Insulin Production. An increase in Insulin shut down the fat burning process.

Nor-epinephrine, Epinephrine, Glucagon, Cortisol, and Growth Hormone

These are the body's "Fat Burners". They are suppressed when Insulin is elevated, via carbohydrates, with the Branch Chain Amino Acid, Leucine and proteins.

Acute (short term) elevation of these "Fat Burners" during exercise allow the body to access and use a greater percentage of body fat.

Caffeine

This is a good pre work out supplement.



Post Workout Meal

Research (Dr Brad Schoenfield) consuming something immediately after a workout isn't necessary. Having something a few hours later is just as effective.



Refractory Protein Period

One of the keys to increasing muscle mass is Muscle Protein Synthesis. Optimization of Muscle Protein Synthesis ensures better recovery and muscle growth.

Research (Dr Layne Norton, Nutrition/Bodybuilder/Powerlifter) determined that Muscle Protein Synthesis is optimizes when protein is ingested every 4 - 6 hours, rather that the dogma regarding eating every three hour.

Your muscle are somewhat like a sponge. When Soaked with water (protein in this case), the Sponge is unable to absorb any more water (in this case protein),

Once the sponge dries out, it is able to absorb more water (process, trigger muscle growth and recovery in this case).

With that said, another piece of dogma that is incorrect is about...

Multiple Meals

The belief that consuming multiple meals/snacks during the day increasing your metabolism is incorrect and counter productive.

Research (Dr John Berardi, etc) in the International Society of Sports Nutrition found multiple meals/snacks during the day restricted fat burning. That due to the fact that Insulin levels were continuously being elevated; block the "Fat Burners", (Nor-epinephrine, Epinephrine, Glucagon, Cortisol, and Growth Hormone).

Longer intervals between eating between means prompted more fat burning.

mTOR, The Anabolic Trigger

Research shows that mTOR (Mammalian Target of Rapamycin) is the anabobolic trigger for muscle growth.

Leucine (one of the BCAAs) turns on mTOR.

Approximately, 2.5 to 4.5 gram of Leucine are require to trigger mTOR.

Younger individual can elicit the effect with about 2.5 gram of Leucine.

Older individual need 3 gram plus of Leucine.

Thus, that amount of protein that you consume in a meal is a vital component for increasing muscle mass.

Leucine Percentages In Protein

Different protein, contain different percentages of Leucine.

1) Whey Protein: 10 - 12% Leucine. 25 gram of Whey = Up to 3 gram of Leucine.

2) Meats, Milk, Cheeses, Caseinate Protein: Approximately: 8% Leucine. 25 grams hese protein yield around 2 grams of Leucine.

3) The majority of Vegan Proteins are low in Leucine.

Pulse Feeding

1) Older Individuals: Plus Feeding is an effective method for older individual to maintain and/or increase muscle mass.

Pulse Feeding means older individual consume a much larger protein intake at meals. That ensures older individuals obtain enough protein/Leucine to trip the mTOR anabolic hormonal switch for muscle growth.

2) Younger Individuals: Pulse Feeding has no effective for increasing muscle mass. That because their system efficiently use lower level of Leucine. So, more for this group, Pulse Feeding isn't beneficial.



Good point.

Kenny Croxdale
This is awesome, Kenny! Thanks a ton!

I'll tweak my pre and post workout strategy based on your inputs and see how my body responds. I just got off my cycle so it's just perfect timing for me to experiment with this.

The bit about mTOR is new to me.

You rock! :)
 
Top Bottom