all posts post new thread

Recommendations/Reviews/FS/WTB Well Built Humans Kettlebell Backpack

Products recommendations and reviews, items For Sale or Wanted To Buy

Conor

Level 5 Valued Member
Hi all,

Has anyone out there bought or used this backpack?

I've got some crazy travel coming up in February and I don't want to be dependent on hotel gyms for trying to keep up with my current program. I am debating the backpack since I need a new carry-on backpack anyway. I know we've had threads around traveling with them before, but this is pretty new so I figured I'd see if anyone has real-world experience with it yet.

Thanks,
Conor
 

Social_Media_Hater

Level 3 Valued Member
I haven't used that backpack, but I have managed to fit 2 20 kg kettlebells into a regular old Jansport backpack that I had since I was in highschool. I was clearly redlining the straps, but all I needed to do was get it into and out of someone else's car without attracting any unwanted attention.

When you say carry-on are you talking about bring a kettlebell on an airplane flight? If so, what size kettlebell, and what else has to go into the same pack? A 16 or 20 could probably fit at the bottom of a regular backpack.
 

Steve Freides

Staff
Elite Certified Instructor
Has anyone out there bought or used this backpack?
@Derek Toshner is one of the testimonials. That is certainly good enough for me!!

I bought one - I don't care for it. It's too long for my size human and bangs into my hips when I walk, and it feels stupid to put on the hip strap when I'm carry only light weights. And the kettlebell was too uncomfortable for me to do anything except try it out in the house.

If anyone is near metro NYC or Philly and would like to buy mine from me, I'd be glad to sell it for a good price. I've worn it to take bulky-but-light packages to the post office exactly twice.

-S-
 

Conor

Level 5 Valued Member
I haven't used that backpack, but I have managed to fit 2 20 kg kettlebells into a regular old Jansport backpack that I had since I was in highschool. I was clearly redlining the straps, but all I needed to do was get it into and out of someone else's car without attracting any unwanted attention.

When you say carry-on are you talking about bring a kettlebell on an airplane flight? If so, what size kettlebell, and what else has to go into the same pack? A 16 or 20 could probably fit at the bottom of a regular backpack.
Yeah, I’m debating on taking a 24kg bell on a 2 week long work trip to Singapore and Sydney I have next month.
 

offwidth

Level 9 Valued Member
I didn’t see anything on this guys site about the technical specs of the pack, nor any close up photos showing the details of construction etc. I wouldn’t buy one based on that alone even though it is cheap.

That aside… I can’t imagine personally ever needing to transport my KB’s by backpack. And in the off chance I ever did I would use one of my good packs to do so. (With the KB’s appropriately positioned and padded within)

Looks like another example of someone trying to sell something there isn’t a real need for (at least for me)
 

pet'

Level 8 Valued Member
Hello,

IMHO, any backpack with a rigid frame (plastic / tube) which also has a hip straps (and possibly chest strap) will get the job done. As long as the weight is at the right height and relatively close to the back, it will work. Straps have to be thick enough to avoid too much wear and tear.

Also, the bell has to be well wedge, that way it will not move from side to side, which is both unpleasant and painful on the long haul. One can use towels or pillows to wedge the bell.

Kind regards,

Pet'
 

Steve Freides

Staff
Elite Certified Instructor
I didn’t see anything on this guys site about the technical specs of the pack, nor any close up photos showing the details of construction etc. I wouldn’t buy one based on that alone even though it is cheap.
Apparently many people, from smaller than me to taller than me, like it quite a lot; I am just not among their number.

That aside… I can’t imagine personally ever needing to transport my KB’s by backpack. And in the off chance I ever did I would use one of my good packs to do so. (With the KB’s appropriately positioned and padded within)
I had some metal plates made up for me locally that are about 25 lbs apiece - about an inch thick, rectangular, and with a handle cut in to be able to grab them. I've used one of these in my day pack and it works well. I have a towel taped around it and keep it that way.

any backpack with a rigid frame (plastic / tube) which also has a hip straps (and possibly chest strap) will get the job done.
This pack does not have a frame.

The kettlebell carrying idea seems well thought-out. There is a thick piece of rigid foam with a hole in the middle for the bell, and velcro straps to keep the handle in place. I tried it with a 16 kg and the bell just didn't stay in place for me. Maybe the idea was that I'd have more other things in the pack at the same time, IDK.

-S-
 

Conor

Level 5 Valued Member
But why?
Why not practicing some SFB skills on the road?
For me it comes down to frequent travel for work and wanting continuity on programming that I’m running. If I’m traveling 2-3 days in a given week then I can usually find a gym on the road to hit for a day or so and/or shift my schedule just enough to keep going without having to take the week off. But I’ve got some monster trips coming up this spring and I’d like to be able to keep up with the program I’m working through without too much hassle.
 

silveraw

Level 7 Valued Member
But why?
Why not practicing some SFB skills on the road?
Ruck out to a hill with a bell in your pack. Park the bell at the top of the hill, walk down, sprint back up and immediately do some swings.

It should give you an idea of why you would want to pack a kettlebell in a backpack.
Plus if you want to just ruck and don't have plates, it is easily accessible.
 
Top Bottom