all posts post new thread

Kettlebell what are the benefits of get ups and swings

Tjerr

Level 6 Valued Member
Certified Instructor
Everything, but depending on your fitnesslevel. I increased my bench press to 100 kg whilst only doing Get Ups; that was a 15 kg increase. Every movement pattern there is, is in the Get Up. Combined with swings it will make you a force to reckon with, without exposure to the 'sport'

I would suggest: do Get Ups for an hour, and come back tomorrow and tell us what exercise your able to do tomorrow without soreness ;)
 

John K

Level 7 Valued Member
Certified Instructor
get ups and swings look like movements you'd never use. i know they increase your punching power due to instructors telling me on the forum, but what other movements to they help in.
What do you mean by "movements you'd never use" and "movements they help in" ? What are your goals in training?

Out of curiosity, have you read Simple and Sinister?

In S&S, Pavel says the swing produces conditioning, fat loss, explosive hip power (glutes and hams), grip development, back benefits. He says the getup is "functional training" teaching you how to coordinate and move your body, helps shoulders stay healthy, and develops strong abs, shoulders, and back. My experience is exactly this.

What I normally tell people is that if you want specific results, train for them specifically - as an example, if you want to bench 200lbs, then bench press intelligently and develop that, don't rely on getting better at getups to get you there. They might. They might not. But getups might facilitate your bench training so that you can stay consistent and injury-free.
 

william bad butt

Level 7 Valued Member
get ups and swings look like movements you'd never use. i know they increase your punching power due to instructors telling me on the forum, but what other movements to they help in.
They are fantastic excersises that will build up your whole body. Your strength and conditioning with a minimalist mindset and little deduction from other training (martial arts, sport, etc...).
 

Tjerr

Level 6 Valued Member
Certified Instructor
That seems a bit hyperbolic.

I don't see triple extension anywhere in the get up.

Nor a squat.

Hinge....sort of?

Nor much laterally, either.

If you look at the movement patterns by Dan John; Push, pull, squat, hinge, loaded carry, they are all there. Floor press to get the bell up in the air, static push to keep it there. Pull when you roll to elbow, you will use your leg but also pull with your arm. Hinge is more obvious when going down, but it's also up. When stepping back and lowering the back knee to the floor, you will (windshield wiper) and hinge in the hips to lower the bell vertically in space and be able to put the hand on the floor. The standing up and down is an asymmetrical squat, so not a tripple flexion, but a squat pattern. That's why in S&S you add the prying goblet squat, but still a squat in the Get Up. For loaded carry, you move from the floor to standing with a bell overhead, that means repositioning with load.

If we look at the general movement patterns:
Push: floor press horizontal, static press vertical.
Pull: horizontal with roll to elbow, again when sweeping the leg, static vertical pull while maintaining tension on the bell overhead the whole time.
Squat: no symmetrical squat, a asymmetric stand up, no single leg stand as well.
Hinge: with lowering the bell, also a hip thrust movement (also a hinge) if you use the high bridge.
Anti - lateral bending: standing straling with a load overhead on a single side, end position.
Anti-extension: same position, standing plank with a bell overhead.
Anti-rotation: in the various movements you don't want to rotate.
Rotation: initial roll to elbow, when sweeping the leg underneath you
Hip flexion, stable spine: reversed, when roll to elbow, you extend the leg as far away as possible and flex the hip to roll upon the elbow, without the leg comming up.

Sure, there are better ways to train everyone of these as a single movement, but if nothing else, swings & get ups (with prying goblet squats) is close to a perfect program for everyone besides their sport.
 
Last edited:

Antti

Level 9 Valued Member
If you look at the movement patterns by Dan John; Push, pull, squat, hinge, loaded carry, they are all there. Floor press to get the bell up in the air, static push to keep it there. Pull when you roll to elbow, you will use your leg but also pull with your arm. Hinge is more obvious when going down, but it's also up. When stepping back and lowering the back knee to the floor, you will (windshield wiper) and hinge in the hips to lower the bell vertically in space and be able to put the hand on the floor. The standing up and down is an asymmetrical squat, so not a tripple flexion, but a squat pattern. That's why in S&S you add the prying goblet squat, but still a squat in the hinge. For loaded carry, you move from the floor to standing with a bell overhead, that means repositioning with load.

If we look at the general movement patterns:
Push: floor press horizontal, static press vertical.
Pull: horizontal with roll to elbow, again when sweeping the leg, static vertical pull while maintaining tension on the bell overhead the whole time.
Squat: no symmetrical squat, a asymmetric stand up, no single leg stand as well.
Hinge: with lowering the bell, also a hip thrust movement (also a hinge) if you use the high bridge.
Anti - lateral bending: standing straling with a load overhead on a single side, end position.
Anti-extension: same position, standing plank with a bell overhead.
Anti-rotation: in the various movements you don't want to rotate.
Rotation: initial roll to elbow, when sweeping the leg underneath you
Hip flexion, stable spine: reversed, when roll to elbow, you extend the leg as far away as possible and flex the hip to roll upon the elbow, without the leg comming up.

Sure, there are better ways to train everyone of these as a single movement, but if nothing else, swings & get ups (with prying goblet squats) is close to a perfect program for everyone besides their sport.

So you have a static press and static vertical pull at the same time? Not accounting for everything else. It's just...

There's much more to an effective exercise than to just having a resemblance of an effective exercise as a part of it.

I think the TGU is fine. I also agree with the same Dan John, that a cup of water or a shoe is the perfect load for it.
 

Tjerr

Level 6 Valued Member
Certified Instructor
So you have a static press and static vertical pull at the same time? Not accounting for everything else. It's just...

Static vertical press as in keeping the arm extended overhead, static vertical pull as in, keeping your shoulder down and packed.

Still, not perfect exercises on their own, but everything is in there, especially when going up to the 48
 

solarbear

Level 5 Valued Member
Get Ups - work all sorts of muscles quite well due to the time under tension - biggest advantage is the mobility and injury prevention of them by stabilising key joints

Swings - explosive, endurance, works entire back chain.

So they are a nice low impact compliment to many athletic endeavours.
 

Kenny Croxdale

Level 7 Valued Member
get ups and swings look like movements you'd never use. i know they increase your punching power due to instructors telling me on the forum, but what other movements to they help in.


Dr Bret Contreras EMG Resarch determined the Turkish Get Up is one of the best Adbominal/Core Movement there is along with some others.

The Best Damn Core Workout

Based on the results of this experiment, I bet the following would be one kick-a#@ workout that'd target the abdominals, obliques, and lower back. Enjoy!
  • Turkish Get Up
  • Chin Up, Hanging Leg Raise, or Weighted Swiss Ball Crunch
  • Ab Wheel Rollout, Bodysaw, or RKC Plank
  • Kneeling Cable Lift, Tornado Ball Slam, Landmine, or Reverse Hyper
Kettlebell Swings

1) Power Develoment


Research shows the Kettlebell Swing rivals Olmpic Movement in Power Output and Development.

If increasing Power in Sports or in general is your objective, it should be considered in you Training Program.

Research Data

Based the data below. Kettlebell Swings. When performed with a load this is one-third to close your body weight greater Power Output is produces and developed.

1665051766399.png


1643466511742.png


Source: Are Heavy Kettlebell Swings Better Than Deadlifts?'

2) Abdominal Pulse Strength Training


The Kettlebell Swing is a "Contract-Relax-Contract" Method.

It increase in Abdominal Strength Force Production and in other muscles groups, as well.

The link above explains in more.

3) High Intensity Resistance Training , HIRT

This Kettlebell Swing Training Method of performing Sets of Every Minute On The Minute is is effective for...

a) Increasing Metabolic Rate

Metabolic Rate is increase for hour afterward...burning more calories, body fat.

b) Increase Power Development

That dependent on the number or Repetition in a Set and the Rest Periods Between Sets.

c) HIRT this is High Intensity Interval Training with Resistance/Weights.

The Paradox

HIRT and HIIT increase both anaerobic and aerobic capacity.

Other types of trainng primiarly only develop one, not the other.
 
Last edited:

Bauer

Level 7 Valued Member
get ups and swings look like movements you'd never use. i know they increase your punching power due to instructors telling me on the forum, but what other movements to they help in.
Have a look at this article:
Every Joint. Every Day. The Elegance of Simple and Sinister | StrongFirst
S+S loads all major joints in almost every angle and promotes joint health this way. (I would add arm bars for shoulder extension.) The warm up and the stretches add to its' allroundness.

You build qualities like (overlapping each other)
- explosive strength/athleticism/power
- static/slow strength
- joint stability under load
- mobility
- endurance/conditioning/alactic capacity
- anti-rotational strength
... with very few moves, that are pretty safe and that can be done with minimal equipment at home by a large and diverse population. And the programming is supet simple.

You have a hinge/pull, a squat, a sort-of-press and a sort-of-carry.

It's elegance amazes me.

Try to write a program that gives so much for so little for so many.

TGUs and Swings have amazing general carryover. S&S is actually a program where you can add the specific qualities that YOU might need individuall because it is not overloaded with 20 correctives for every plane of motion. And you can, after base building, alternate it with other GPP programs that lean a bit more towards other qualities (for example PTTP + running).
 

Adachi

Level 6 Valued Member
I do recall the first time I did a session of 100 swings and 10 getups.

I remember being sore from head to toe. I could feel every muscle from my heel to the base of my skull. It took me an extra 15 minutes to get to my desk because I never used the elevator before I had to find it to avoid the stairs and I had never used it before.

I remember the startling feeling of getting through my first 32kg get-up. My arms and shoulders were doing their best, and my midsection, very much so, had a hard time being stable, and the anti-lunge and lunge at the top; it was slow, controlled, and tense from my overhead palm down to my calves and feet.

What I mean to get at is that it may be the case that one isn't regularly swinging things between their legs, or holding things overhead while they get up off the ground. Maybe these aren't necessarily common movements to be performed.

But it would seem that it is perfectly common for pretty much all of your muscles to be used during these movements.

To borrow a turn of phrase:

"You may not be interested in the swing and the get-up. But the swing and the get-up are interested in you."
 
Last edited:

jayjo

Level 5 Valued Member
SWINGS = work the biggest joint & muscle in the body. Having strong hips and legs will keep you from turning into an old man with a big belly and skinny legs and no but.
GET UPS = make it less scary to get up off the floor. Its like that add for life alert when old lady falls "I've fallen and I can't Turkish Get Up". She can't get up because she does not have a decent sized kettlebell.
 

TimothyGander

Level 5 Valued Member
I think this qualification of whether you would use an exact movement in real life is somewhat misleading. If you look through that lens closely enough, any lift or strength exercise looks pointless.
Floor press to get the bell up in the air,
Most people seem to sort of yank the bell into the starting position with two hands, therefore negating that particular benefit.
 

Gypsyplumber

Level 6 Valued Member
get ups and swings look like movements you'd never use. i know they increase your punching power due to instructors telling me on the forum, but what other movements to they help in.
For me both movements, as well as all the kettlebell lifts have really helped me work stability muscles in my trunk.
 

Hung

Level 7 Valued Member
I don't really understand the point of sore muscle. Lots of Pavel's material is about development of strength without/limit of soreness...and now someone told me soreness is the clue of exercise effective? I did leg press for the first time after half year and it makes me sore to the bone. I squat that weight for 10 singles in 10 minutes and feel nothing...does that make leg press a better exercise?

For the OP, get up and swing are great exercise. Like @Coach Louie said above, give it a try and enjoy the fruit! If you're not convinced then it's fine! Lots of other great exercises!
 

Steve Freides

Staff
Elite Certified Instructor
I don't really understand the point of sore muscle.
Soreness is a good indicator of soreness. :)

I recall the first time I did one-legged contralateral (opposite arm and leg) kettlebell deadlifts - I was so sore I had trouble coming down stairs for a week afterwards. But that only happened the first time I did them. I rotate them in and out of my training and even if I haven't done them in a year or longer, I'm still fine afterwards, no soreness.

-S-
 
Top Bottom