What is a good pulling pair to the OAOLPU?

xagunos

Level 6 Valued Member
One of the main benefits in the OAOLPU is the ability to maintain tension and unify the whole body as you perform the exercise.

Is there a pulling exercise that could yield similar benefits in terms of whole body tension while working the pulling structures?

Chin-ups wouldn't cut it simply because the lower body isn't anchored hence it's not really "whole body".

I am thinking of maybe a One-Arm One-Leg Ring Row possibly?

 
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BJJ Shawn

Level 5 Valued Member
Dan John has talked about making chin/pull ups a full body tension exercise by crossing your feet, and isometrically trying to pull them back apart from each other as hard as possible. It puts you into a pike position, and really gives you full body tension while pulling, give it a try.

 
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xagunos

Level 6 Valued Member
Dan John has talked about making chin/pull ups a full body tension exercise by crossing your feet, and isometrically trying to pull them back apart from each other as hard as possible. It puts you into a pike position, and really gives you full body tension while pulling, give it a try.

While this may be appropriate in learning the skill of tension, I do not believe the lower body or torso is truly stressed by this exercise like it would by a OAOLRR.
 

Don Fairbanks

SFG II
Certified Instructor
Single or Dbl. bell snatches would be a nice pairing with OAOLPU's. Try the walking snatch format. Do a snatch, take two steps with bell extended overhead, snatch again, repeat. Switch hands as necessary if using one bell. Dbl. snatch and then walk a bit, repeat. Tension everywhere.
 

GaryT

Level 1 Valued Member
One of the main benefits in the OAOLPU is the ability to maintain tension and unify the whole body as you perform the exercise.

Is there a pulling exercise that could yield similar benefits in terms of whole body tension while working the pulling structures?

Chin-ups wouldn't cut it simply because the lower body isn't anchored hence it's not really "whole body".

I am thinking of maybe a One-Arm One-Leg Ring Row possibly?

One of the main benefits in the OAOLPU is the ability to maintain tension and unify the whole body as you perform the exercise.


Is there a pulling exercise that could yield similar benefits in terms of whole body tension while working the pulling structures?

Chin-ups wouldn't cut it simply because the lower body isn't anchored hence it's not really "whole body".

I am thinking of maybe a One-Arm One-Leg Ring Row possibly?

Front lever progressions albeit static.

Also, ring rows but legs unsupported and straight up parallel to the straps and perpendicular to the floor/ground similar to L-sit positioning. Plenty of tension there.
 
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xagunos

Level 6 Valued Member
Front lever progressions albeit static.

Also, ring rows but legs unsupported and straight up parallel to the straps and perpendicular to the floor/ground similar to L-sit positioning. Plenty of tension there.
Maybe I should replace tension with unification. I feel like this is one of the real benefits to the OAOLPU where the hand and foot are anchored and the body must be rigid during the movement. The torso (I just hate the word 'core') stability gained from this is in my opinion why it is a great upper dominant yet full body exercise (similar to a deadlift being a lower dominant full body exercise).
 

GaryT

Level 1 Valued Member
Maybe I should replace tension with unification. I feel like this is one of the real benefits to the OAOLPU where the hand and foot are anchored and the body must be rigid during the movement. The torso (I just hate the word 'core') stability gained from this is in my opinion why it is a great upper dominant yet full body exercise (similar to a deadlift being a lower dominant full body exercise).
How about a one arm, one leg kB swing? There’s anchoring, unification & whatnot 👍
 

q.Hung

Level 6 Valued Member
Is there a pulling exercise that could yield similar benefits in terms of whole body tension while working the pulling structures?
Heavy barbell row (Pendlay, bent over, row-deadlift...), tug of war row, sled pull variation....that's all I can think of, but it's not pure bodyweight exercise.
 

bluejeff

Level 6 Valued Member
I don't think there's a purely bodyweight movement that fits this.... At least nothing is really jumping out at me. I second @GaryT 's suggestion for front lever stuff though, maybe even front lever rows, or something akin to a Victorian (but scaled, of course)
 

Period

Level 5 Valued Member
My vote would go to the L-sit rope climb (up fast, down slow). My Greco coach apparently was able to climb 15 continuous lengths on a 6m rope without touching the floor or lowering his legs when he was wrestling at 68 kg. The guy has the most amazing gripping power I have ever felt, and just doesn't get tired.
 

James Sullivan

Level 5 Valued Member
Elite Certified Instructor
One of the main benefits in the OAOLPU is the ability to maintain tension and unify the whole body as you perform the exercise.

Is there a pulling exercise that could yield similar benefits in terms of whole body tension while working the pulling structures?

Chin-ups wouldn't cut it simply because the lower body isn't anchored hence it's not really "whole body".

I am thinking of maybe a One-Arm One-Leg Ring Row possibly?

In preparing for my SFB I balanced OAPU practice with one arm (two feet ROFL) inclined TRX rows. 5 reps@ for5 sets.
 

James Sullivan

Level 5 Valued Member
Elite Certified Instructor
Curious here... Did you happen to see carryover to pull up (or chin up) practice, especially around the lat, scapular, rhomboid activation getting chin and neck above the bar?
Was not an obvious carryover to pull-ups, but things were a bit muddy. Prior to SFB preparation I had been on the greedy side of things with my pull-up training resulting in some over-use type injuries. When I was ok to train pull-ups again it had been to long to connect any dots.
 

Ryan T

Level 6 Valued Member
Certified Instructor
Was not an obvious carryover to pull-ups, but things were a bit muddy. Prior to SFB preparation I had been on the greedy side of things with my pull-up training resulting in some over-use type injuries. When I was ok to train pull-ups again it had been to long to connect any dots.
Gotcha.

Interesting about the overtraining. Karen Smith related a similar issue in the Breakthrough Secrets podcast. Why is taking our own advice so difficult sometimes...? :rolleyes:
 
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